National Academies Press: OpenBook

A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum (2024)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
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Page 352
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
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Page 353
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
×
Page 354
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
×
Page 355
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
×
Page 356
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
×
Page 357
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Member and Staff Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27429.
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Page 358

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APPENDIX B B1 APPENDIX B COMMITTEE MEMBER AND STAFF BIOSKETCHES Sue Bredekamp, Ph.D., (Co-Chair) is an Early Childhood Education Specialist on curriculum, teaching, and professional development. She consults for national and state organizations, institutions of higher education, departments of education, and Head Start. As Director of Professional Development at the National Association for the Education of Young Children, she developed and directed the accreditation system for early learning programs and led the association’s work on curriculum and assessment, early literacy, and teacher preparation. She edited NAEYC’s 1987, 1997, and 2009 editions of Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age Eight. She is author of a teacher education textbook, Effective Practices in Early Childhood Education: Building a Foundation (4TH ed.). She received the Visionary Leadership Award from the McCormick Center for Early Childhood Leadership. The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes named her one of eleven Pioneers in Early Childhood Education. She holds a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and an M.A. in Early Childhood Education from the University of Maryland. She was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics which produced, Mathematics in Early Childhood: Paths toward Excellence and Equity. Linda M. Espinosa, Ph.D., (Co-Chair) is Professor Emeritus of Early Childhood Education at the University of Missouri, Columbia and has served as the Co-Director of the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University and Vice President at Bright Horizons Family Solutions. She was most recently Co-PI for the Getting on Track for Early School Success: Effective Teaching in Preschool Classrooms project at the University of Chicago and former Co-PI for the Center for Early Care and Education Research—Dual Language Learners (CECER-DLL) at Frank Porter Graham CDI at the U of NC. Her recent research and policy work have focused on effective curriculum and assessment practices for young children from low-income families who are dual language learners. Dr. Espinosa’s latest book, Getting it RIGHT for Young Children from Diverse Backgrounds (2015) focused on quality education for DLLs. She was a contributing author of the report from NASEM (2017), Promoting the Educational Success of Children Learning English. Recently, she has co-authored the California Early Learning Foundations, English Language Learners Chapter, the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks English Language Development Chapter, and the Desired Results Developmental Profile, 2010, English Language Development Assessment Measures. Dr. Espinosa served as the lead consultant for the LAUSD Transitional Kindergarten program development team and is a member of the Council for Professional Development Governing Board. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B B2 Deana M. Around Him, Dr.P.H., is a Senior Research Scientist at Child Trends and adjunct faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She also serves on the Tribal Early Childhood Research Center’s Leadership Team. Dr. Around Him’s research aims to improve the well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) children, youth, and families through community-based and -engaged approaches that meet their cultural and contextual needs. She has worked with centers that focus on strengthening tribal research capacity and policies, and she strives to conduct research and evaluation that respects tribal sovereignty, builds on cultural strengths, and produces outcomes that inform policy and programs. Her training focused on the social determinants and life course approaches to health, culturally responsive evaluation, research ethics, and maternal and child health. She serves on the Editorial Board for the Maternal and Child Health Journal and as co-Chair for the Native Research Network’s Board of Directors. Dr. Around Him earned her Bachelor of Arts in Community Health from Brown University, Master of Science with a concentration in maternal and child health from the Harvard School of Public Health, and Doctor of Public Health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Garnett Saunders Booker III, M.S., is an Early Childhood ELL Teacher with District of Columbia Public Schools. Garnett Booker previously served as a lead teacher at the University of Delaware Early Learning Center. Garnett Booker also taught in a Head Start program and charter school in early school grades. During his studies Garnett Booker has researched developmentally play practices in early childhood. The research resulted in creating a rough and tumble play space for young children at the Early Learning Center. Garnett has also presented on practices that support developmentally play in ECE and the developmental importance of Makers Space in ECE programs. Garnett has received the Strattner Gregory Child Advocacy Award and the Dr. Rita Fillos Award from the University of Delaware. Garnett Booker has a master’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies. Douglas H. Clements, Ph.D., is a Kenney Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning, Professor, and Executive Director of the Marsico Institute of Early Learning and Literacy at University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education. Previously, Dr. Clements worked as a kindergarten teacher for 5 years and a preschool teacher for 1 year, and he has since conducted research and published widely in the areas of (1) the learning and teaching of early mathematics; (2) computer applications in mathematics education; (3) creating, using, and evaluating a research-based curriculum and in taking successful curricula to scale using technologies and learning trajectories; and (4) development and evaluation of innovative assessments of mathematics achievement, as well as mathematics teaching. Prior to his appointment at the University of Denver, Dr. Clements was a State University of New York (SUNY) Distinguished Professor at the University of Buffalo. He was a member of President Bush’s National Math Advisory Panel and served on the National Research Council Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics. Dr. Clements received his Ph.D. in elementary education from SUNY at Buffalo. Lillian Durán, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences at the University of Oregon. She holds a B.A. in Elementary Education from Antioch Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B B3 College and a M.A. in Education and Human Development from the George Washington University. Her research is focused on improving instructional and assessment practices with multilingual children. She is currently involved in multiple efforts developing Spanish language and literacy assessments from preschool to 6th grade. She also is the project director on several Office of Special Education Programs training grants focused on preparing master’s and doctoral students to serve traditionally marginalized populations with disabilities with a focus on equity and improving educational outcomes. Dr. Durán frequently delivers presentations nationally on the topic of recommended practices in language and literacy practices with multilingual learners and she has served on multiple equity and diversity councils including the National Association for Young Children and the Division for Early Childhood. Prior to Dr. Durán’s work in higher education she worked for 9 years as an early childhood special education teacher. Iheoma U. Iruka, Ph.D., is a Research Professor in Public Policy and the Founding Director of the Equity Research Action Coalition at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Iruka is leading projects and initiatives focused on ensuring that racially minoritized children and children from low-income households are thriving through the intersection of racial equity and culturally grounded research, program, and policy. Example of areas of expertise including family engagement and support, early care and education programs and system, and quality improvement systems. Dr. Iruka serves on numerous national and local boards and committees, such as the National Advisory Committee for the US Census Bureau, Scientific Advisor for the National Research Conference in Early Childhood, American Psychological Association’s Board of Educational Affairs, and Brady Education Foundation. She served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees on Supporting Parents of Young Children and Applying Neurobiological and Socio-behavioral Sciences from Prenatal through Early Childhood Development: A Health Equity Approach. Susan C. Levine, Ph.D., is the Rebecca Anne Boylan Distinguished Service Professor of Education and Society in the Department of Psychology at the University of Chicago, joining the faculty after receiving her Ph.D. in Psychology at M.I.T. Her research focuses on the development of early spatial and numerical thinking, and particularly on the kinds of adult-child interactions that foster learning in these domains. Notably, she studies how particular kinds of mathematical activities and conversations contribute to children's mathematical learning, and how math-relevant learning opportunities can be increased through interventions, both at home and at school. She also studies the role of math attitudes in mathematical performance and interests with a particular focus on the intergenerational effects of adult math anxiety on math learning and math attitudes. Dr. Levine is the inaugural faculty director of the UChicago Science of Learning Center. Joan L. Luby, M.D., is the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Psychiatry (Child) at the Washington University School of Medicine where she founded and leads the Early Emotional Development Program. Dr. Luby specializes in infant/preschool psychiatry and her program of research has focused on early childhood affective psychopathology and emotional development for >30 years. Dr. Luby has conducted some of the first large scale empirical studies of preschool Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B B4 onset depression and provided data on the validity, clinical characteristics, longitudinal course and brain developmental outcomes of early onset depression. With colleague Deanna Barch, she conducted a 17 year longitudinal study that investigates behavior and brain development in a sample enriched for depressive symptoms arising at age 3 that includes 5 waves of brain scanning. Findings have informed the impact of key psychosocial factors including maternal support and early life adversity on brain and behavioral development. Luby’s studies have established the powerful role of early childhood caregiver support and psychosocial adversity on neurodevelopment. Dr. Luby has developed and tested a novel early parent-child intervention for depression that focuses on enhancing emotion development showing powerful effects and neural change. Dr. Luby has published > 200 papers and has been awarded numerous honors including the Brain and Behavior Foundation Ruane Award and the American Psychiatric Association Ittelson award. Camille Maben served as Executive Director of First 5 California for the last decade. In that role, she staffed the California Children and Families Commission, and directed the work of the agency and its staff. Through her leadership, First 5 California is implemented several evidence- based and results-driven programs that focused on quality. Camille also served as the Division Director of the Child Development Division at the California Department of Education (CDE). in that role she provided leadership and oversight to over 700 early care and education contractors with a $1.7 billion dollar budget. In her earlier work, she was appointed by the Governor to serve as Chief of Staff for the Office of the Secretary of Education where she coordinated and developed the Governor's education policy agenda. Camille also served as the Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Senior Advisor to former State Superintendent Delaine Eastin and has worked as a consultant to the Assembly Education Committee. Her early career was spent serving young children with nationally recognized Bev Bos at the Roseville Community Pre- School. Camille has served on numerous boards and committees including 30 years as a Rocklin Unified School District board member. Deborah A. Phillips, Ph.D., is Professor Emerita of Psychology, and Associated Faculty of Public Policy at Georgetown University. She completed her undergraduate degree in Psychology from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Yale University. She was the first Executive Director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine and served as Study Director for From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Child Development. She has also served as President of the Foundation for Child Development, Director of Child Care Information Services at the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and Congressional Science Fellow on the staff of Congressman George Miller. Dr. Phillips has served on the National Board for Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education), the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child at Harvard University, and the Research Advisory Board of the Committee on Economic Development. Her research on the developmental impacts of early education – child care, pre-k programs, and Head Start – has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Child Care Bureau, and numerous national foundations, as well as recognized at White House conferences and in the State of the Union address. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. She received the 2022 Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B B5 Nicholas Hobbs award from the American Psychological Association, the 2022 President’s Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Award from Georgetown University, and the 2011 Distinguished Contributions to Education in Child Development Award from the Society for Research in Child Development. Christina J. Weiland, Ed.D., is an Associate Professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Education and (by courtesy) Ford School of Public Policy, where she also co-directs the Education Policy Initiative. Her research focuses on the effects of policies and interventions for children 0-8, particularly those from families with low incomes. Her work is also characterized by strong partnerships with practitioners, particularly the Boston Public Schools Department of Early Childhood. Her work has been recognized by awards from multiple professional associations (i.e., the Society for Research in Child Development, AERA, the Association for Education Finance and Policy) and supported by funding from the Institute of Education Sciences and multiple foundations. She holds a doctorate from Harvard University in Quantitative Policy Analysis in Education. Vivian C. Wong, Ph.D., is a research methodologist in the field of Education. Currently, Dr. Wong is an Associate Professor in Research, Statistics, and Evaluation in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on research designs for evaluating interventions in early childhood and K-12 systems. She has examined the effectiveness of state pre-kindergarten programs in five states, as well as the impact of half- versus full-day pre-kindergarten on students’ achievement. As a methodologist, Dr. Wong’s expertise is in improving the design, implementation and analysis of randomized experiments, regression-discontinuity, interrupted time series, and matching designs in field settings. Her most recent work emphasizes new methods on the design and analysis of systematic replication studies, especially for generalization purposes. Currently, Dr. Wong is a Principal Investigator or co-Principal Investigator of multiple IES- a and NSF-funded grants focused on systematic replication studies. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Psychological Methods. She is an Associate Editor of AERA Open. Dr. Wong received her PhD in 2011 from Northwestern University and was awarded the Outstanding IES Predoctoral Fellow Award. Staff Rebekah Hutton (Study Director) is senior program officer with the National Academies. She is currently study director of the Committee on A New Vision for High Quality Pre-K Curriculum and the Committee on the Impact of Active Shooter Drills on Student Health and Wellbeing. Previously, she was previously study director of the Committee on Exploring the Opportunity Gap for Young Children from Birth to Age 8, Committee on Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women of Color in Tech, and Committee on Summertime Experiences and Child and Adolescent Education, Health, and Safety. Prior to working at the National Academies, Ms. Hutton was an education management and information technology consultant working on projects in the United States, as well as in Haiti, Equatorial Guinea, and Djibouti. She has also worked as a program manager and researcher at the National Center on Performance Incentives at Vanderbilt University Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B B6 and as an English-language lecturer in Tourcoing, France. During her time with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Ms. Hutton has also worked on projects focused on fostering the educational success of children and youth learning English, reducing child poverty, and promoting the mental, emotional, and behavioral health of children and youths. She received her M.Ed. from Vanderbilt University in international education policy and management. Tara Nazari is a senior program assistant with the Board on Children, Youth and Families (BCYF). she supports the Impact of Active Shooter Drills on Student Health and Wellbeing, and the Committee on A New Vision for High Quality Pre-K Curriculum. Before joining the National Academies, she previously worked as a research assistant at the University of Maryland, assisting development of family and community-based interventions. She is a recent graduate from the University of Maryland College Park and holds a Bachelor of Science in Family Science. She plans to pursue a master’s of public health in the near future. Amy Stephens is associate board director for the Board on Science Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is an adjunct professor for the Southern New Hampshire University Psychology Department, teaching graduate-level online courses in cognitive psychology and statistics. She has an extensive background in behavioral and functional neuroimaging techniques and has examined a variety of different populations spanning childhood through adulthood. She was the study director for the workshop on Graduate Training in the Social and Behavioral Sciences and recently released consensus reports Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades (2022), English Learners in STEM Subjects: Transforming Classrooms, Schools, and Lives (2018), Changing Expectations for the K–12 Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace (2020), and Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors (2021). Stephens holds a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Talented Youth and the university’s School of Education. Elizabeth “Libby” Tilton is a research associate on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She has a background in management, with specialties in training, logistics and relationship management, and data analytics. Her interests include Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Work- Family Balance; and COVID’s effect on the workforce. Libby has a Bachelor of Science in Human Resources Management from Salisbury University and is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology in D.C. Meredith Young is a program officer on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She currently serves as the study director for the project Understanding Breastfeeding Promotion, Initiation and Support Across the United States: An Analysis. In her time at the National Academies, she has supported projects evaluating dietary reference intakes, federal feeding guidelines, obesity prevention and treatment initiatives, preschool curriculum, and the racial and economic opportunity gap in child outcomes. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B B7 Meredith has supported evaluation and strategic planning efforts at the National Academies, and she serves as a volunteer staff reader for other divisions. She received a B.S. in Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise with a concentration in Dietetics from Virginia Tech and an M.N.S.P. in Nutrition Science and Policy from Tufts University. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs

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A high-quality preschool education can foster critical development and learning that promotes joyful, affirming, and enriching learning opportunities that prepare children for success in school and life. While preschool programs generally provide emotionally supportive environments, their curricula often fall short in advancing learning in math, early literacy, and science, and lack the necessary support for multilingual learners emerging bilingualism. Additionally, access to high-quality, effective early learning experiences may be limited and inadequate based on factors such as a childs race, location, gender, language, identified disability, and socioeconomic status.

A New Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curriculum examines preschool curriculum quality for children from ages three to five, with special attention to the needs of Black and Latine children, multilingual learners, children with disabilities and children experiencing poverty in the United States. The report articulates a vision for high-quality preschool curricula for all children, grounded in an equity and justice-oriented principles from inception to implementation and evaluation.

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