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Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection (2024)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
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Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
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Page 236
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
×
Page 237
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
×
Page 238
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
×
Page 239
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
×
Page 240
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
×
Page 241
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Long-Term Health Effects of COVID-19: Disability and Function Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27756.
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Page 242

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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Paul A. Volberding, M.D. (Chair), is a retired professor of medicine and pre- vious director of the AIDS Research Institute at the University of California, San Francisco. Trained in medical oncology, he became involved in the early AIDS epidemic in San Francisco and has experience in clinical and translational research in antiviral therapeutics. Dr. Volberding is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, a fellow of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science, a master of the American College of Physicians, and a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Current HIV/AIDS Reports. Dr. Volberding currently serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Standing Committee of Medical and Vocational Experts for the Social Security Administration’s Disability Programs and has chaired numerous National Academies committees, including several for the Social Security Adminis- tration, most recently, the Committee on Selected Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue and Disability. He received his medical degree from the University of Minnesota and completed his residency at the University of Utah in internal medicine and his fellowship in medical oncology at the University of California, San Francisco. Ziyad Al-Aly, M.D., is director of the Clinical Epidemiology Center and Chief of Research and Education Service at the U.S. Department of Veter- ans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Healthcare System. He is a clinical epidemiolo- gist at Washington University in St. Louis. He led work that provided the first systematic characterization of the post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 235 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 235 5/21/24 11:31 AM

236 LONG TERM HEALTH EFFECTS OF COVID-19 infection and, subsequently, the characterization of the increased risks of cardiovascular disease, neurologic disorders, diabetes, and kidney disease following SARS-CoV-2 infection. His lab also produced evidence character- izing the effects of vaccines on Long COVID, the health consequences of repeated infections with SARS-CoV-2, and the effect of antivirals on the short- and long-term outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection. His research inter- ests include pharmacoepidemiology, environmental epidemiology, global health, and most recently short- and long-term effects of COVID-19 on health outcomes. In his work on COVID-19, Dr. Al-Aly regularly interacts with pharmaceutical companies in an uncompensated capacity, including ongoing, informal discussions with Pfizer about the VA’s work on antivirals and Long COVID and previous ad hoc paid consultations for Gilead and Tonix. His work is published in several major journals, highly cited, and frequently featured in scientific and mainstream media outlets. Dr Al-Aly serves on the editorial board of several major journals. He has also testified before the U.S. Senate as an expert witness on Long COVID. Dr. Al-Aly obtained his medical degree from the American University of Beirut and completed his postgraduate medical education at St. Louis University and Washington University in St. Louis. Jacqueline Becker, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical neuropsychologist, assistant professor of medicine, and researcher in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Becker is multiple principal investigator of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) RECOVER-Neuro, a multisite randomized controlled trial to treat cognitive dysfunction post COVID-19. She is principal investigator of an Alzheimer’s Association/National Academy of Neuropsychology award investigating the neuropsychological effects of COVID-19 in older adults from populations with health disparities. She is co-investigator of various Long COVID initia- tives, such as an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality–sponsored project integrating primary and Long COVID care to improve outcomes for minoritized adults in New York City and a NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke award to identify the long-term neu- rological effects of COVID-19 using 7 Tesla multimodal neuroimaging. Dr. Becker is co-chair of the International Neuropsychological Society’s NeuroCOVID-19 SIG [special interest group], joining efforts to harmonize global data on post-COVID cognitive sequelae. Her research focuses on the bidirectional impact of cognitive impairment in chronic medical diseases, particularly in underserved minority populations. She completed her doc- toral training at Fordham University in New York, her residency at Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, and then a 2-year clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurology at Northwell Health. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 236 5/21/24 11:31 AM

APPENDIX C 237 Alfred O. Berg, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair emeritus of the Depart- ment of Family Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle. He has served on many national expert panels to assess evidence and provide clini- cal guidance, including serving as chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and committees convened by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the American Medical Association. Dr. Berg was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 1996 and has participated in more than a dozen committees convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including serving as chair of committees on post-traumatic stress disorder, formaldehyde toxicity, genetic testing, and standards for sys- tematic reviews. He has also served on the Board of Population Health, and as reviewer, monitor, and coordinator for the National Research Council. Dr. Berg received the Thomas W. Johnson Award for career contributions to family medicine education from the American Academy of Family Physi- cians; the F. Marian Bishop Leadership Award from the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Foundation; and the Curtis Hames Research Award, family medicine’s highest research honor. He earned his medical degree at Washington University in St. Louis and his master of public health at the University of Washington in Seattle. Andrew B. Bindman, M.D., is executive vice president and chief medical officer for Kaiser Permanente. He is also Kaiser Permanente’s executive sponsor for the Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine. Dr. Bindman served as director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in 2016–2017. Prior to joining Kaiser Permanente, he spent more than 30 years on the faculty at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he practiced and taught clinical medicine while conduct- ing research on health access and outcomes that resulted in more than 200 published scientific articles. Dr. Bindman is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, where he serves on the Board for Health Care Services and chairs a series of workshops on diagnostic excellence. He is a board-certified general internist, and he completed his residency in internal medicine at UCSF. He was Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clin- ical Scholar at Stanford University. Dr. Bindman is a graduate of Harvard College and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Aluko A. Hope, M.D., M.S.C.E., is associate professor in the Department of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), where he works as an intensivist in the Medical Intensive Care Unit and serves as medical director of OHSU’s Long COVID program. Previously, Dr. Hope worked for 11 years at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he was founding PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 237 5/21/24 11:31 AM

238 LONG TERM HEALTH EFFECTS OF COVID-19 director of the COVID-19 Recovery Engagement clinic. His research, which receives funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, seeks to improve the long-term outcomes of adult survivors of acute illnesses such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. His postgraduate training was in primary care internal medicine at Columbia University Medical Center, followed by training in pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital and Montefiore Medical Center, with a focus on integrating palliative care and geriatric principles into the critical care setting. As a graduate of the Montefiore-Einstein Certificate Program in Bioethics and Medical Humanities, Dr. Hope has also developed and facilitated postgraduate courses to teach empathic communication skills to learners at all levels. He graduated from Vassar College with a B.A. in biology and Hispanic studies and earned his medical degree and master’s degree in clinical epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Leora I. Horwitz, M.D., is director of the Center for Healthcare Innova- tion and Delivery Science at New York University (NYU) Langone Health, director of the Division of Healthcare Delivery Science in the Department of Population Health at NYU School of Medicine, tenured professor of population health and of medicine, and a practicing internist. Dr. Horwitz was on faculty at Yale University for 7 years before moving to NYU in 2014. Her work focuses on improving the safety and quality of health care delivery. She is currently co–principal investigator of the Clinical Science Core for the National Institutes of Health’s RECOVER Initiative to study post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, responsible for the adult cohort study, from which publications on Long COVID are forthcoming. Dr. Horwitz also conducts federally funded research on value in health care; has devel- oped quality measures for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; and co-directs a T32 training program in population health and health care delivery. She was named an emerging leader by the National Academy of Medicine and is an elected fellow of the American Society of Clinical Inves- tigation. Dr. Horwitz received her undergraduate degree in social studies from Harvard and her medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She then completed residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York and the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at Yale University. Clarion E. Johnson, M.D., is vice chair of the Yale School of Public Health and is a national associate of the National Research Council. Formerly, he was global medical director at ExxonMobil. Dr. Johnson is on the advisory board at the Center for Work, Health, & Well-being and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. He is board-certified in internal medicine, PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 238 5/21/24 11:31 AM

APPENDIX C 239 cardiology, and occupational medicine. In 2012, Dr. Johnson received the Society of Petroleum Engineers Award for Health, Safety, Security, Environ- ment and Social Responsibility. He is also the recipient of a French Army Medal for the antimalaria project Tetrapole. Dr. Johnson is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Standing Com- mittee of Medical and Vocational Experts for the Social Security Admin- istration’s Disability Programs and has served on a number of National Academies committees, including as co-chair of the planning committee for Public–Private Partnership Responses to COVID-19 and Future Pandemics: A Workshop and co-chair of the Forum on Public–Private Partnerships for Global Health and Safety. He is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and has received an Outstanding Alumni Award. Barbara L. Kornblau, J.D., O.T.R./L., FAOTA, DASPE, CCM, CDMS, is a retired professor and program director of Idaho State University’s Occupa- tional Therapy Program. She has served as a consultant on disability access and disability employment and policy issues for the American Association on Health and Disability, the United Spinal Association, and the Coalition for Disability Health Equity. As an occupational therapist, Dr. Kornblau has consulted with employers, developers, and local governments on Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility. As an attorney, she has litigated cases under ADA, in employment discrimination, state and local govern- ment services, and health care services. Dr. Kornblau is past president of the American Occupational Therapy Association and a former Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy fellow in the U.S. Senate, where she worked on disability issues. She has also served as a government relations and health policy consultant to Special Olympics International. She is recognized as an expert in disability policy, return-to-work issues, assistive technology, and reasonable accommodations under the ADA and the Rehabilitation Act. Dr. Kornblau previously served on two National Academies’ committees for the Social Security Administration, including the Committee on Selected Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue and Disability. She received a J.D. from the University of Miami and an occupational therapy degree from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Joao Pedro Matias Lopes, M.D., is assistant professor at Case Western Reserve University and an attending physician in the Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology at University Hospitals (UH) Rainbow and Babies Hospital, UH Cleveland Medical Center, in Cleveland, Ohio. His primary clinical and research interest is in immunology, particularly in the area of inborn errors of immunity, including participation in projects to identify the impact of COVID-19 infection in patients with inborn errors of immunity and the pathogenesis of prolonged COVID-19 symptoms. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 239 5/21/24 11:31 AM

240 LONG TERM HEALTH EFFECTS OF COVID-19 Dr. Lopes earned his medical degree from Nova Medical School in Lisbon, Portugal, and then completed an internal medicine residency at University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, followed by an allergy and immunology fellowship at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. Laura A. Malone, M.D., Ph.D., is pediatric neurologist and director of the Pediatric Post COVID-19 Rehabilitation Clinic at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland. She is also a physician scientist in the Cen- ter for Movement Studies and assistant professor of neurology and physical medicine and rehabilitation at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Malone addresses the pediatric neurology needs of children with post-acute/Long COVID syndromes and is actively engaged in research to improve outcomes for children after COVID-19. Her research interests also include neurorehabilitation and improving outcomes after neurological injury. Dr. Malone has contributed to national and international programs and guidance regarding pediatric Long COVID, including serving as lead author on the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation’s Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC) Infection Collaborative guid- ance statement on the assessment and treatment of PASC in children and adolescents. She has also served on the expert panel for the World Health Organization’s Post COVID-19 Condition Case Definition for Children and Young People and on the planning committee for Long-Term Health Effects Stemming from COVID-19 and Implications for the Social Security Administration workshop organized by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Malone is a member of the International Pediatric Rehabilitation Collaborative, the Child Neurology Society, and numerous other professional societies related to neurological rehabilitation. Dr. Malone has a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she studied gait rehabilitation and motor control after brain injury. She earned her medical degree from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed her residency in pediatrics and pediatric neurology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Louise Elaine Vaz, M.D., M.P.H., is associate professor of pediatrics in the Department of Infectious Diseases at Oregon Health & Science Univer- sity. She is also medical director of complex outpatient antibiotic therapy, allowing children to transition from hospital to home to complete their antibiotics for severe infections. Dr. Vaz maintains memberships with the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Her research is in optimization of care transitions and the effect of disparities and social vulnerability on health outcomes. Dr. Vaz has taken care of acute COVID, multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 240 5/21/24 11:31 AM

APPENDIX C 241 as well as Long COVID pediatric patients. In late 2020, she led efforts to create a multidisciplinary clinic to care for children with Long COVID in Oregon and southwest Washington state. From January 2021 to May 2022, Dr. Vaz saw children in a joint visit with Long COVID pediatric physical therapists and led a dynamic team that included multiple subspecialists in nearly every pediatric subspecialty to help address the diverse effects of Long COVID in children. In May 2022, she transitioned out of the clinical role and focused efforts on large education initiatives to clinicians, school administrators, and nurses. In 2021, Dr. Vaz was invited to co-chair the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R) national workgroup on pediatric Long COVID and is coauthor on the AAPM&R’s Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC) Infection Col- laborative guidance statement on the assessment and treatment of PASC in children and adolescents. Dr. Vaz graduated from Vanderbilt School of Medicine and completed her residency in pediatrics at the Seattle Children’s Hospital/University of Washington. She completed dual pediatric infectious disease and health services research fellowships at Boston Children’s Hos- pital and holds a master’s degree in clinical effectiveness from the Harvard School of Public Health. Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez, M.D., is an academic physiatrist and profes- sor and chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. She also is currently clinical chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University Hospital Sys- tem and medical director of critical illness recovery and neurorehabilita- tion at Warm Springs Rehabilitation Hospitals in San Antonio. Previously, Dr. Verduzco-Gutierrez served as medical director of the Brain Injury and Stroke Program at TIRR Memorial Hermann in Houston, Texas. Her area of clinical expertise is traumatic brain injury, stroke rehabilitation, interven- tional spasticity management, and now post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2. She is currently directing a COVID-19 recovery clinic, the first in South Texas, which aligns with her mission to increase access to interdisciplinary care, optimize function, and improve quality of life for survivors with Long COVID. She is a co–principal investigator at one of the National Institutes of Health’s RECOVER Initiative sites and received an Agency for Health- care Research and Quality grant to expand access to Long COVID care. Dr. Verduzco-Gutierrez is coauthor on all eight of the current published guidance statements by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation’s (AAPM&R’s) Multi-Disciplinary Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 Infection Collaborative. She is also associate editor of the American Journal of PM&R. Dr. Verduzco-Gutierrez has current consul- tancies with AbbVie, Merz, Ipsen, Revance, and Piramal, related to her PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 241 5/21/24 11:31 AM

242 LONG TERM HEALTH EFFECTS OF COVID-19 work in interventional spasticity management, and a past consultancy with ReNeuron and Medtronic. She previously had a consultancy with Moderna for education on vaccinations and with Pfizer related to her work in migraines. She also is an uncompensated consultant to AstraZeneca, addressing outcomes data for patients with cancer and immunodeficiencies and with GSK addressing outcomes of persons with meningococcal dis- ease. Dr. Verduzco-Gutierrez has testified twice before Congress on issues pertaining to Long COVID. She has received the Top 25 Women in Health- care Award from the National Diversity Council and Healthcare Diversity Council and the Distinguished Member Award from AAPM&R. Sarah Wulf Hanson, Ph.D., M.P.H., is lead research scientist of global health metrics at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle. She has more than a decade of experi- ence estimating the burden of disease for several diseases, conditions, and risk factors in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. In her current role, she is working to estimate the health burden of Long COVID and to improve GBD methods and stability of nonfatal burden estimates over time. Dr. Wulf Hanson received a B.S. in bioengineering from Rice University and both an M.P.H. and Ph.D. in global health metrics from the University of Washington in Seattle. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs A02506-Long-Term_Health_Effects_of_COVID-19_AppC.indd 242 5/21/24 11:31 AM

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Since the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020, many individuals infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), have continued to experience lingering symptoms for months or even years following infection. Some symptoms can affect a person's ability to work or attend school for an extended period of time. Consequently, in 2022, the Social Security Administration requested that the National Academies convene a committee of relevant experts to investigate and provide an overview of the current status of diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of long-term health effects related to Long COVID. This report presents the committee conclusions.

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