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Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief (2024)

Chapter: Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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images Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief

Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery

Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief


The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has led to widespread devastation which presents acute and long-term challenges for Ukraine’s science, education, and technology sectors. As the war in Ukraine continues with no end in sight, concern has been growing among the international science community about immediate and lasting damage to the Ukrainian science enterprise and its ability to support the long-term economic recovery of Ukraine.

To discuss efforts to strengthen the Ukrainian science and innovation system, the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies), in partnership with the Simons Foundation and ETH Zurich, convened a workshop with leading experts from around the world representing academia, ministries, industry, philanthropy, and foundations on March 19–20, 2024. The workshop had two goals. The first day focused on mechanisms for supporting international science and innovation cooperation between Ukraine and other key countries through the development of the National Academies’ recently established Science and Innovation Fund for Ukraine.1 Participants discussed the needs of Ukrainian scientists and how the proposed Fund could best be structured to support them. The second day focused on identifying key approaches and best practices for linking science and innovation to economic recovery and growth. The workshop built on existing National Academies activities involving Ukraine and was developed with the goal of sharing information with government officials as they prepare for the June 2024 Ukraine Recovery Conference in Germany.2

This Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief provides a high-level summary of the key discussions among speakers and participants during the workshop.

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

Chris Luebkeman, ETH Zurich, moderated the first session, which highlighted goals of the workshop and set the stage for discussions. Joel Mesot, ETH Zurich, began by stating that while the war continues, planning for the reconstruction of Ukraine should be a priority. ETH Zurich has supported Ukraine by placing Ukrainian researchers within the institution and providing financial support. He said the workshop provides a concrete example of science diplomacy, with the goal of support-

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1 The Fund aims to cultivate a robust Ukrainian science and technology enterprise capable of rebuilding Ukraine and fueling its long-term economic prosperity and national security. In addition, the Fund will provide near-term relief to individual Ukrainian scientists working both inside and outside of the country. The National Academies is currently developing the structure of the Fund (in part based on discussions held at this workshop), which will include a Secretariat housed at the National Academies. See: https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/science-and-innovation-fund-for-ukraine.

2 See: https://www.urc-international.com/.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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ing Ukraine in developing a strong science system, both currently and after the war.

“Knowledge is the only commodity that grows when it is shared,” said Guy Parmelin, Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research, Switzerland. The quotation succinctly summed up the goals of the workshop: to encourage cooperation to support Ukraine in creating strong education, innovation, and research programs. Economies can create prosperity with well-trained scientists by providing new insights and innovations. Parmelin said the workshop builds on the already strong examples of cooperation between Switzerland and Ukraine, including a memorandum of understanding between the two countries.

The genesis of the current meeting began in 1944, said David Spergel, Simons Foundation, when experts convened in Bretton Woods to discuss how to rebuild Europe after World War II. Despite the uncertain future, people had the vision to think about the future, to imagine the Europe of today—at peace, economically vibrant, and built on science and innovation. This same vision motivated the organization of this meeting. Another motivation for the meeting, said Spergel, is to advance the belief that basic research is the foundation for so much advancement in our society. With additional focus on basic science, we can strengthen the world. As donor nations gather to support Ukraine’s recovery, he said, it is important to note that while Ukraine is well-known as an exporter of wheat, it is also a place of excellent research. Countries need to support efforts to expand that research and innovation.

Vaughan Turekian, the National Academies, added that after the full-scale invasion of Ukraine there were swift efforts from the scientific community to come together to support the country through funding and support for scientists. This initiative and others like it demonstrate the power of partnership for Ukraine and for science as a whole, Turekian said.

SCIENCE AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN UKRAINE

Ian Wiggins, The Royal Society, moderated a panel focused on science and higher education in Ukraine. The first speaker, Denys Kurbatov, Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine, discussed the new priorities for science and innovation strategy for Ukraine. He noted that today, the spheres of science and innovation in Ukraine are separate, and there is a need to prioritize applied research as much as possible to bring science and innovation together.

Kurbatov said that the Ukrainian government is taking actions to support science and innovation, such as encouraging the development of new tools in the forms of scientific contests and competitions, including a new request for proposals for competitive research grants, to be released in April 2024. The government is also working on legislative improvements to support funding priorities. For example, de-bureaucratization is an important focus for bringing in extra-budgetary funds from international partners and Ukrainian businesses. These procedures are currently heavily regulated and will require legislative change.

While the war has posed severe challenges for the country, it is necessary to continue to support Ukraine and form a new vision of Ukraine’s future, said Oleksandra Antoniouk, National Council of Ukraine on Science and Technology Development. She argued that some may not believe it is time to discuss the future; however, without such a vision, Ukraine cannot win. Reforms and the recovery process should continue with this vision of the future in mind, she said.

Yaroslav Prytula, Ukrainian Catholic University, offered data on the impact of the war on science and scientific institutions in Ukraine. Over the past two years, 30 percent of educational and research institutions have been damaged, and 20 percent of scientific community has left the country. On a hopeful note, the majority of scientists remain in Ukraine, and they continue to produce high quality research despite limited funding and damaged facilities.

During the discussion, panelists were asked how to prioritize international support for research in Ukraine. Kurbatov said that international partners can contribute their experience by helping to prioritize directions for Ukrainian research entities, as well as identifying research to support the economy and society. While it is important to support Ukrainian scientists living abroad, Antoniouk noted, there is also a need for support for

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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those who remain in the country. Prytula agreed with these comments, identifying three main priorities where the international community can contribute: (1) addressing factors that push Ukrainian scientists abroad, such as inadequate salaries; (2) funding the creation of safe places for researchers to work; and (3) modernizing the management and vision for the research community.

Participants asked how to prioritize research to do the “most good” for Ukraine’s recovery. Panelists emphasized the importance of building a research-based economy and paying close attention to Ukraine’s position within the European Union—beyond serving as a key supplier of wheat and agriculture.

Kurbatov said there are efforts underway to develop an evaluation methodology for research and higher education institutions (HEIs). The hope is to evaluate the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU) institutes and Ukrainian HEI’s research activities. Most of these were developed in Soviet times, so there is a need to update their work and create collaboration among research institutions and universities. Ukraine will need help from the international community to provide experts to conduct evaluations of the Ukrainian research and HEI system.

When asked whether to focus support on basic versus applied research, or on the creation of centers of excellence or the system as a whole, workshop participants noted the need to support a new culture of academia and develop structures that can support strong scientific results. Both fundamental and applied research should be a priority for funders. However, bottom-up approaches are important for developing fundamental research, Antoniouk said. She added that it is also important to assess higher technology readiness levels, develop strong research teams with managerial skills, and foster a culture of entrepreneurship. Regardless, panelists supported the idea that research priorities should be driven by Ukrainians.

Participants discussed mechanisms to address brain drain in the country, highlighting that the situation is different for men and women. Men aged 18-60 cannot cross the border without special permission while women may go abroad and return freely. As noted earlier by Prytula, the low salaries for researchers in Ukraine and old research infrastructure encourage some to leave and then not to return.

Training the next generation of researchers was also a topic of discussion. Kurbatov said that training modern engineers is impossible without a strong research base. Ukrainians want to train the next generation in research by prioritizing science through universities and allocating additional funding for scientific research. Other participants noted that industry partnerships can also expand the number of engineers in the country. The IT industry in the country has grown and has resulted in 300,000 specialists with good salaries. This industry may be a good area to highlight for students considering science degrees.

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT RESEARCH IN UKRAINE: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

Franklin Carrero-Martinez, the National Academies, moderated a session focused on lessons learned and opportunities related to international programs to support Ukrainian research.

To begin the session, Olga Polotska, National Research Foundation of Ukraine (NRFU), discussed the work of NRFU, which is unique as it is the primary national instrument for funding R&D projects in Ukraine. The foundation aims to implement international practices for competitive selection of projects. It funds basic, applied, and developmental research that is laboratory-intensive in all areas.

Polotska explained that the NRFU has established strong international partnerships and scientific collaborations. For example, the organization is partnering with the Dutch Research Council and is also involved with a new initiative, the U.S. National Science Foundation’s (NSF) IMPRESS-U (International Multilateral Partnership for Resilient Education and Science System in Ukraine). The NRFU has also issued a joint call for proposals for R&D projects through the Ukrainian–Swiss Joint Research Projects program. This is the first bilateral call with the Swiss National Science Foundation to support researchers in Ukraine.

In 2023, the Horizon Europe Office opened in Ukraine with the goal of providing support to national contact

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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points across the country. The office will strengthen research ties between Ukraine and European institutions. Additionally, the NRFU is an active participant in scientific communities, such as in Science Europe.3

Polotska also discussed future opportunities to support Ukrainian scientists as identified by the NRFU:

  • Launching international initiatives and bi- and multi-lateral calls for proposals with NRFU as a partner.
  • Providing financial support for designated calls to be administered by the NRFU.
  • Supporting the professionalization of research management and administration.
  • Financing excellent proposals that were ranked high-quality in NRFU calls but were not funded.

She also discussed several lessons learned from the perspective of the NRFU:

  • Measures of support (funding sources) can and should be diversified.
  • Design of international joint calls and initiatives can be implemented quickly, although this requires considerable effort on all sides.
  • Identifying international reviewers is challenging.
  • Support for Ukrainian research is not confined to financial support.
  • Research management and administration deserves more respect and visibility in Ukraine and worldwide.

Maija Kukla, NSF, further discussed the new NSF IMPRESS-U initiative.4 The initiative has two goals: to support excellence in science and engineering research, education, and innovation through international collaboration; and to promote the integration of Ukrainian scientists into the international research community. The initiative is jointly managed by the Estonian Research Council, the Latvian Council of Science, the Research Council of Lithuania, Poland’s National Science Centre, the Polish National Agency for Academic Exchange, the NRFU, the National Academies, and the U.S. Office of Naval Research, as well as private donors and foundations.

Kukla explained that the initiative has two primary funding mechanisms, including the EAGER proposals, which support new, transformative research, or novel ideas not yet tested or accepted. Supplemental funding supports researchers who have already been funded by NSF to expand their work to include international partners, including the United States and Ukraine.

Priority will be given to projects that propose: (a) creative ways for enhancing efficiency and resiliency of international partnerships; (b) efficient concepts to prepare an internationally engaged research workforce; and (c) efficient and significant contributions to build a modern, state-of-the-art research/education/innovation ecosystem in Ukraine. Kukla noted that the program has already received a large number of quality proposals.

Gregory Gabadadze, Simons Foundation, discussed the Foundation’s efforts to support Ukraine, including partnering with other organizations and institutions such as NSF, the National Academies, the Bulgarian and Polish Academies of Sciences, and others, that are working to support researchers who have fled Ukraine as well as those who have been persecuted in Russia.

The Simons Foundation Presidential Award has been granted to 420 Ukrainian scientists who remain in the country and work in fields such as biology, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, among others. The Foundation uses a bottom-up approach in supporting scientists, interacting directly with heads of labs in Ukraine to identify funding needs. Gabadadze added that there is a need to make connections with Ukrainian research institutions stronger as well as encourage younger people to apply for research positions in the country.

Laure Ognois, Swiss National Science Foundation, discussed the Foundation’s efforts to support and collaborate with the Ukrainian community. The NRFU and the Swiss National Science Foundation held a bilateral call in 2023 and received more than 120 high-quality proposals from researchers that are currently under evaluation. Fifteen of these proposals will be funded on a range of topics. The next step in terms of building knowledge

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3 See: https://www.scienceeurope.org/.

4 See: https://new.nsf.gov/news/nsf-announces-international-multilateral.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

and collaboration is to fund and develop multilateral partnerships.

The Global Research Council, a global association of science-funding agencies, will host a session on sustainability in May 2024, and the rebuilding of Ukraine is a topic that will be of great interest, Ognois noted. This Council can help to develop ideas about funding mechanisms for Ukraine research.

Oliver Pieper, German Federal Ministry for Education and Research, began by describing data on the number of Ukrainians who are now in Germany. Nearly 218,000 Ukrainian children are being educated in Germany and a recent UNESCO report on scientific institutions in Ukraine identified 1,000 scientists currently conducting research in Germany. There is a long 30-year history of scientific collaboration between the two countries.

The basis of this collaboration is creating effective dialogue to ensure the countries develop mutually beneficial agreements, creating bilateral research projects for funding, and establishing research projects with high impact for researchers who are planning to return to Ukraine. Pieper noted that Germany is hosting the Ukraine Recovery Conference and is elevating issues of science as a high priority in the discussions. “Science must be at the forefront,” he said.

Sebastiaan den Bak, Dutch Research Council, acknowledged the courage of the Ukrainian research community, stating that it was incredible what has been achieved during the past two years. The Netherlands and Ukraine are working closely together on science funding and policy decisions and have had the opportunity to hold various meetings to exchange information. The countries signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) in 2023 and developed an open call resulting from discussions with NRFU to support scientists in Ukraine. Thirteen Ukrainian researchers have been funded to work jointly with a Dutch scientist on their research. The countries are looking to build a future for collaboration after the war ends.

Renata Schaeffer, University of Cambridge, said that the university has taken on a number of initiatives with Ukraine, including providing support for individual Ukrainian researchers, developing a curriculum mapping initiative for secondary school, and offering English language training in Ukraine. In March 2022, the university supported 26 Ukrainian scholars and Ph.D. students and their families from Ukraine. Two of the 26 scholars now have full-time positions with the university or other universities in the United Kingdom. The university also launched a grant program through NRFU to fund 12 scholars in Ukraine who would work with university scholars.

Schaeffer added that the University of Cambridge is also supporting a curriculum mapping pilot for secondary students returning from abroad to help them return to school. Ultimately, the hope is to be able to deploy the results of this pilot to other areas of conflict. The university is also expanding English language classes offered to Ukrainians, partnering with Amazon Web Services to offer these services online and free of charge to anyone with a Ukrainian IP.

Shaeffer noted that despite all the best intentions, working with other countries can be complicated; there is a steep learning curve to getting these initiatives off the ground.

During the discussion, panelists discussed NRFU’s need for international reviewers to support its work. Gabadadze noted that while some reviewers may be willing to do this on a voluntary basis, it would be better to offer payment to attract quality reviewers. Kukla added that the NSF has a large database of funded researchers that is open and widely accessible and could be used to identify researchers. She suggested working with NSF program directors who have expertise in specific fields and could support the selection of reviewers.

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED SCIENCE AND INNOVATION FUND FOR UKRAINE

Yulia Bezvershenko, Ukraine House, moderated a session on the proposed Science and Innovation Fund for Ukraine. David Spergel, Simons Foundation, announced that the Foundation will provide $2 million annually to the Fund for the next 3 years. He noted that the Simons Foundation hopes that the Fund can attract other international funders to support Ukraine’s research community, both during and after the war. The goal is to develop a fund with a budget of several million dollars over the next few years that will focus on catalyzing excellence in research.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

Meanwhile in Ukraine, there is a need to more clearly connect science and innovation to economic recovery, said Turekian. From the National Academies perspective, the Fund will be a long-term endeavor, with a focus on trust, shared values, and effective partnerships. Ukrainians will drive the funding priorities. There is also a need to create a platform that is interoperable so that as additional funding is added, there is a sustainable structure in place.

Cathy Campbell, U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), discussed the work of the BSF, which has provided an important example of a successful international collaboration, in this case, between the U.S. and Israel. The BSF has existed for more than 50 years and currently operates on a $100 million endowment. The Foundation has had a tremendous impact on science and innovation, supporting 50 Nobel Laureates in both the U.S. and Israel. NSF established CRDF Global in 1995 as a nongovernmental organization with the goal of supporting research, training, offering direct funding, and funding for entrepreneurs.

Oleksiy Kolezhuk, National Council of Ukraine on Science and Technology Development, said that there are many restrictions currently in place that must be navigated in order to provide funding effectively to support research in Ukraine. There is also a need to modernize the current curriculum; offer grants for students to develop projects with joint supervision; and for funding to support initial feasibility studies, capacity building, and to create opportunities for dialogue.

During the discussion, representatives from the Simons Foundation were asked about their vision for what the funds could support and initial first steps. Spergel noted that the goal for the Fund is to raise about $10 million per year, with the hope that these funds will come from contributing partners. The Fund will be developed with a clear structure in mind to support not only research but also network building, workshops, and fellowships for early career researchers. “Science happens best at a variety of scales,” said Spergel, and therefore there is a need to structure the Fund to appropriately support a variety of projects.

Turekian added there is a need to develop the credibility of the Fund within the scientific community at the international level. This could be achieved through oversight from a high-level international board. Immediate funding is needed to catalyze movement on this initiative. As governments change and shift, however, there is a need for connectivity and stability within the Fund.

Campbell said that building an international review system in Ukraine could be a function for the Fund. Other participants noted a need to support proposal writing skills development and processes for identifying international partners.

FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN CIRCULATION

Spergel moderated a panel discussion focused on strategies to bring research talent back into the Ukraine. Yulia Bezvershenko, Ukraine House, described her research on human capital in Ukraine. In a survey of 398 respondents from 30 countries conducted between August and October 2023, 57 percent of those who fled the country did so because of the invasion. Nearly 62 percent of these respondents had Ph.D.s. When asked if they would return to Ukraine, 12 percent said they would in any case, 26 percent said they would with conditions (i.e., when the war is over or 1-2 years after the end of the war); 42 percent said they might return, with conditions; and 20 percent said they would not return. Preconditions reported for the return of these scientists, included safety, opportunity for professional fulfilment, access to research infrastructure, and a monthly salary of 2,000 euros.

Key findings from the study indicated that 96 percent of the scientific diaspora are ready to cooperate with Ukrainian scientists/institutions, while 80 percent are ready to return to Ukraine or are considering options. There is a lack of data about the Ukrainian diaspora in terms of location, specialization, and qualifications. Pilot programs for involving returning Ukrainian scientists who work abroad may be helpful, particularly if they are built on the best practices of other countries.

Svitlana Mayboroda, ETH Zurich, discussed the need to build excellence in Ukrainian institutions. She suggested developing joint appointments with international institutions for postdoctoral students and for young tenure track positions. Part-time or half-time positions may

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

be an attractive option for those considering returning to Ukraine. Use of funds to support the creation of a network of students in Ukraine would be particularly impactful. There is also a need to define excellence in research. International reviewers should be involved in evaluating proposals for the Fund. Research and education are currently separate in Ukraine; bringing these two areas together to support the next generation of researchers is important, she said.

Tymofii Brik, Kyiv School of Economics, described the experience of his university during the war. While many have left or have been forced to move, overall, the university has grown during this period. Brik noted that strong signaling to the international research community that Ukraine is a center of excellent research is important. Double affiliations and demonstrating that an organization is trustworthy through documentation of financial audits may also help to bridge the Ukrainian and international science community.

Brik noted that Ukrainian students at his university are ambitious and believe they are positioned in the best place in Ukraine, but not in the best place in the world. Ukraine needs to become a center of excellence in research at a global level.

Valeria Kovach, NASU, discussed efforts by the NASU to fund research in Ukraine. NASU grants have been provided to laboratories and young scientists to conduct research in priority areas of S&T development. The budget for 2023 for 38 projects was 26.5 million Ukrainian Hryvnia (approximately $654,000 USD). Some of this funding was granted to support research teams of young scientists. NASU also offered 320 scholarships for Ph.D. candidates in 2023. Also in 2023, 19 young scientists participated in the NASU postdoctoral research program. Financial support for employment was provided to 13 of these young scientists.

Peter Bertsyk, NASU, added that to address brain drain, there is a need to give researchers options. The National Academies initiative with Poland to relocate and support Ukrainian researchers immediately following Russia’s full-scale invasion Ukraine showed how this could be done by bringing people together for support and team building, co-funding, and offering double affiliations.

Bertsyk suggested providing 5-year funding opportunities to research teams in Ukraine that integrate a co-principal investigator located abroad who can support research management activities. He discussed the need to keep the success rate high so as not to demoralize applicants, offering fellowships, and providing grants for the best teachers.

CURRENT RESEARCH AND TRAINING INITIATIVES WITH UKRAINE

The workshop included a session that allowed participants to share their ongoing projects related to supporting and strengthening Ukrainian science across a wide variety of scientific disciplines. Gregory Gabadadze, Simons Foundation, summarized presentations on current research and training initiatives with Ukraine:

  • Luc Patthey, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), discussed the “Light for Ukraine” Project, which will build a Ukrainian beamline at the SOLARIS storage ring to contribute to the reconstruction of the Ukrainian scientific community in the field of photon science. The project will begin in 2026. PSI is committing 1–2 million Swiss Francs but is in need of another 2–3 million for the project.
  • Andreas Wieser, ETH Zurich, spoke about Mapping Ukraine, a start-up with the goal of creating a digital platform to provide open access to documentation of damage to civil infrastructure and homes in Ukraine. Data will be gathered using a large variety of technologies from mobile phones to sophisticated 3D reality capture solutions and satellite imagery.
  • Maryna Viazovska, EPF Lausanne, highlighted the work of the International Center for Mathematics, established by distinguished Ukrainian mathematicians. The Center has held workshops in Kyiv and Warsaw to engage young researchers and students on a variety of topics. Additional workshops will be held during the summer of 2024 on quantum physics and machine learning, among others.5
  • Maksym Yarema, ETH Zurich, discussed a research initiative focused on microelectronics, called Rebuilding the Microelectronic Ecosystem in Ukraine. Microelectronics are a centerpiece of technological development and engineering in Ukraine. In fact, the

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5 See: https://mathcentre.in.ua/en/events.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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    Ukrainian government has included microelectronics among its priority research areas in the recently released 2030 Innovation Vision.

  • Michael Eichmair, University of Vienna, presented on efforts through the university to support Ukrainian students, including offering grant support, psychological assistance, and lectures and educational opportunities in German. Eichmair noted that with additional knowledge of German, Ukrainian students can expand the range of their research.

CONVERSATION WITH PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS ABOUT THE FUND CONCEPT

David Spergel, Simons Foundation, summarized conversations with private entities focused on how they can strengthen and develop the proposed Fund to support Ukrainian research. In those conversations, participants noted the importance of articulating the need for such support to government officials and in funding the whole research cycle rather than providing short-term investments. He noted that the discussions focused on how to better implement the program, looking to examples such as BSF.

Spergel also detailed the feedback that workshop participants provided on the concept note on the Fund. Developed by the National Academies, the concept note outlined and addressed issues such as the management and funding mechanism for the Fund. Simons Foundation will provide $2 million annually for the next 3 years and is hoping to draw in funds from other philanthropic groups, governments, and individuals. The Fund will be managed by a Secretariat housed at the National Academies.6

SECOND DAY: OPENING PLENARY

The second day of the workshop focused on identifying key approaches and best practices for linking science and innovation to economic recovery and growth.

Iryna Venediktova, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Ukraine to the Swiss Confederation and to the Principality of Liechtenstein, said that the recovery of a country from war depends on education and science. Eight million people have left Ukraine during the war, including many children. There is a need to create safe workplaces and communities so that they can return. A robust science ecosystem is necessary to support the country’s competitiveness; Ukraine needs the best people and laboratories. The Ukrainian system is complicated, but the country demonstrates every day that it can fight with an aggressor; ultimately “we can overcome.”

Spergel noted that there are many challenges that impede commercialization in Ukraine, including the legal and regulatory environment as well as funding to scale up these activities. The challenges of the war have led Ukraine to be innovative and responsive—they have created ideas that have been deployed in the battlefield. Ukrainians are a people whose necessity has driven them to be innovators. Turekian added that his hope is that colleagues in Ukraine understand that there is a community that is watching and wanting to help. “We are all helping each other during this complicated time,” he said.

Four key areas necessary to support science in Ukraine include networks, impact, dialogue, and inspiration, said Vanessa Wood, ETH Zurich. Science is inherently an international enterprise based on networks, with teams coming together to achieve something great. War has historically accelerated the time from idea to implementation or impact; technologies that are rapidly developed in Ukraine will have an immediate impact. Dialogue is an important part of fostering collaboration between companies and scientists. Only through these discussions and with industry partnerships can we have these exchanges. With the transition from science to practical application, we can be inspired, Wood noted. There is a need to support the young people in Ukraine to make sure they feel inspired and envision a future for themselves. By leveraging networks to support impact, we can create a dialogue that is inspirational to the next generation, she said.

INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN UKRAINE

Kolezhuk moderated a session on innovation and economic recovery in Ukraine. Oksana Berezhna, Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine, reiterated the point that Ukraine is not only boldly asserting its right in the war, it is also on the threshold of bringing new ideas to the market. The country is in third place in the development of innovation among states with lower-middle

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6 See: https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/science-and-innovation-fund-for-ukraine.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

income. Highly qualified human capital is essential to moving forward.

Berezhna described the Ukrainian innovation ecosystem which consists of 4 ministries (Ministries of Education and Science, Economy, Digital Transformation, and Strategic Industries) and numerous R&D organizations, all of whom interact and contribute to development. The ecosystem also includes the private sector; technology, science, and innovation parks; and innovation hubs, accelerators, and incubators.

When asked about the disconnect between science and innovation, Berezhna noted that one potential solution is co-financing as well as developing more concerted efforts to work with the education sector to inform them about the importance of innovation. Berezhna also discussed a new initiative called Lab to Market that is funding innovative work in the commercial sector, including in the medical field. The Young Entrepreneurs Program is also encouraging students to learn about entrepreneurship and is currently in 40 universities across Ukraine.

Berezhna added that the new Fund could be impactful by providing targeted funding, particularly to start-ups and to support the development of dual-use technologies.

Valeriya Ionan, Ministry of Digital Transformation of Ukraine, said that in only 5 years, the digital reforms in Ukraine have been extensive and wide-reaching. There is now a Vice Prime Minister for Education, Science, Technology, Innovation, and Digital Transformation who is working on a global innovation strategy for Ukraine, called WIN WIN.7 The vision was presented in December 2023, and Ionan noted that they are in the process of working with other ministers and state agencies to confirm the vision and strategy. Areas of focus for the WIN WIN strategy include:

  • Deregulation to create a favorable climate for investment.
  • Effective management of state institutions.
  • Access to financing and infrastructure.
  • Development of knowledge intensive investment and human capital.
  • Protection of intellectual property.
  • International cooperation.

Ionan noted that innovation is a cross-sectoral topic making it difficult to coordinate; however, Ukraine has the potential and resources to address this challenge. Also, Ukraine is interested in developing centers of excellence to gather best practices from around the world to advance science in Ukraine.

NATIONAL MODELS FOR LINKING SCIENCE AND INNOVATION TO ECONOMIC GROWTH

Anton Aschwanden, Google, moderated a session on national models for linking science and innovation to economic growth.

The first speaker, Mina Teicher, BSF, discussed how BSF has been successful in catalyzing innovation. Israel has been successful in science and innovation because it has recognized the need to invest in R&D to have a strong economy. It is estimated that a $1 investment in science yields $10 in GDP; certain sectors will give an even higher return.

According to Teicher, the Israeli model of transforming innovation into economic returns stands on 3 pillars:

  1. People. This includes having access to those with Ph.D.s, encouraging youth, particularly girls, to study mathematics in high school, and supporting immigrants who contribute to and establish knowledge-based industries.
  2. Investment. Countries must invest in science and innovation, including in private companies. Israel invests 5.5 percent of its GDP into science. Investing in R&D results in economic growth, not vice-versa.
  3. An atmosphere of freedom, flexibility, and risk-taking. There is a need for a flexible system for scientists to engage in research, as well as a culture of risk-taking that encourages students and researchers to pursue entrepreneurship.

“Innovation is the overspill effect of excellent science,” said Tarmo Soomere, Estonian Academy of Sciences. The Estonian government had to make drastic changes to its science system 30 years ago which set the country up for its current success in science and innovation. The first step was to inventory its research at the time. The inventory identified ways to eliminate unnecessary and unsuccessful research and continue to support high-quality research. It also examined ways to bridge research and

__________________

7 See: https://winwin.gov.ua/en.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

education by targeting universities, with the goal of creating a pool of excellent scientists. The Estonian government took the lead in conducting this inventory to assess those with and without demonstrated results. This approach may be helpful for Ukraine as it builds its science and innovation system.

Teicher noted that international aid can encourage innovation and science in Ukraine by encouraging young scientists to return to the country. Soomere advised that Ukraine work towards building its science program before its innovation strategy. Ukraine is in a unique position to become a model of innovation, said Aschwanden. After all, a start-up nation has the “concrete ability to turn adversity into a renewable source of energy.”

INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION: LINKING RESEARCH TO MARKETS FOR BROADER ECONOMIC AND SOCIETAL IMPACT

Dmytro Pokhylko, Columbia Tech Ventures, moderated a discussion focused on linking research to markets for economic and societal impact. He noted that research, innovation, commercialization, and economic development are all linked; we cannot have one without the other.

Orin Herskowitz, Columbia Technology Ventures, said that universities are increasingly focused on entrepreneurship and innovation; they care more about start-ups than they used to, in part due to faculty and student demand. Additionally, the federal agenda in the United States has been pushing start-ups through funding. Federal grants also now require a clear commercialization strategy. He noted that in U.S. universities, there is a lot of competition for grants, but there is also lot of cooperation in doing start-ups.

Precursors to innovation at universities include excellent scientists, postdocs, and graduate students, access to labs, and legal and regulatory frameworks that support start-ups, etc.

Oleksandra Antoniouk, Academ.City, discussed her organization’s efforts to support a science-based economy in Ukraine. This included learning from others in the scientific community about developing science parks. Given constraints, the “science park model” has not been translatable to Ukraine. Instead, Antoniouk said there has been a focus on raising funds and developing a grants office to support scientists and entrepreneurs. It is difficult to teach scientists to be entrepreneurs, so they are creating a program to provide training to encourage those with this skill set to help in this capacity. Richard Rikoski, Hadal, Democracy Investments, reiterated this need. He indicated that it is better to find people who are good at pitching ideas and develop them than to focus on developing these skills in scientists.

Tymofii Brik, Kyiv School of Economics, noted the growing understanding of the need for entrepreneurship in Ukraine. There is a great deal of talent in Ukraine but few who have an understanding about how to deploy a project. Their business schools are helping to build these skills.

When asked which sectors should be a focus for Ukraine, Rikoski suggested defense technology and unmanned systems. From the crisis perspective, Lina Constantinovici, Innovation 4.4, added that it took 40 years to fully globally commercialize solar power; she said that we do not currently have that time, so the question becomes, how do we remove the barriers and reduce it to a 5–10-year timeline. In terms of sectors, she suggested focusing on areas needed for human survival, such as technologies related to water, food, and the built environment, including managing waste. Access to talent, training, mentors, and facilities are all critical as well.

TECHNOLOGY, INNOVATION AND FINANCING

Jeff Martin, Tribal Planet, moderated a session on technology, innovation, and financing, noting that “when true innovation takes place, it’s existential.” Kevin Laws, AngelList, discussed the work of his organization, as a platform where investors could gather to invest in start-ups. In 2023, the organization invested $1.6 billion in start-ups globally. Today, traditional venture financing is no longer a primary source of funding for start-ups. Instead, seed start-up funding has been a key source, which is often relationship-based. Most investors are looking for start-ups that offer 2-3 founders with business skills who have a delivery mindset and are trustworthy. They should also have traction in the field and social proof of success.

Deborah Fairlamb, Green Flag Ventures, is the only American firm in Ukraine investing in Ukraine. She noted that there is a disconnect between the university and education system and a thriving tech ecosystem.

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

COVID-19 and the war have taken their toll on the science ecosystem in Ukraine. Importantly, the current tech environment does not exist as top-down; it is organically grown and consists of tech company clusters in various cities throughout the country. In a further comment, Fairlamb mentioned the Lviv IT cluster as an exemplary cluster that united most of Lviv’s tech companies and universities to develop new educational programs and a tech innovations ecosystem.

When Ukrainians began to travel in Europe without a visa, it was an important moment for the private sector, and an emergence of the business sector. Today, there are 8 “unicorn” companies in Ukraine, or those who have earned $1 billion in the open market; 15 companies are in the pipeline and are close to this designation.

Fairlamb said there is great commercial potential in Ukraine. Technology funding is 4.5 percent of GDP. There is a pipeline of students, 58,000 or so, who are studying technology or adjacent fields. The number of start-ups is growing rapidly; Ukraine is doing amazing things with few resources, she said.

Michael Marquez, Morado Ventures, discussed his work as a later stage investor in Silicon Valley. Many unicorn companies (those with a valuation over $1 billion) were minted since 2021, however, since this time, conditions have not been favorable for start-ups. Technology stocks plunged, signaling that the stock market is not receptive to initial public offerings (IPOs) going public. This has made it challenging to raise funds for start-ups. Today, there are the fewest number of venture capital backed IPOs since 2013; AI is the only sector that has grown.

Marquez added that to support innovation in Ukraine, there is a need to foster a culture of entrepreneurship and risk-taking and provide the funds to allow start-ups to succeed and invest in human capital. Developing a supportive regulatory environment is important, including one that addresses IP protection, tax incentives, and ease of doing business. Herbert Gilman, Simbol AI, added his experience regarding the evolution of AI and machine learning as a rapidly growing area of and a potential focus for Ukraine.

“If we don’t help Ukraine advance its early education system, its future innovation is at risk,” said Carol O’Donnell, Smithsonian Science Education Center. The Smithsonian Science Education Center focuses on K-12 education and its mission is to transform early education through science in communities across the globe. The Center has announced an agreement with Ukraine to collaborate on an inquiry-based STEM learning system for its youngest learners. The goal is to enrich experiences for students across the country.

Workshop participants discussed how best to communicate to funders about the need to invest in the whole ecosystem, from education to commercialization. Some panelists noted that this is a long-term game; some of the research being conducted today will translate to commercialized technology in 25 years. Funders should invest in the pipeline.

U.S. POLICY SUPPORTING THE RECONSTRUCTION OF UKRAINE

Tyson Barker, U.S. Department of State, discussed the Department’s work to support Ukraine’s recovery. A key focus is supporting the country’s security, for example, creating pockets of air defense where economies can thrive and creating a safe environment to support innovation and research. Providing economic support to Ukraine during the war is also critical. The U.S. is supporting Ukraine as it works to rewrite laws to ensure they are EU and Western ready. There is also an initiative to see how Russia can pay for Ukraine’s post-war reconstruction costs. Other areas of focus include creating risk mitigation tools, offering skills development and reintegration for refugees and veterans, and supporting sustainable planning efforts.

KEY THEMES FROM THE WORKSHOP

The workshop concluded with a summary discussion in which participants highlighted key themes from throughout the workshop. Ukrainian researchers are resilient and have outproduced other countries in terms of science productivity, despite COVID-19 and the war, numerous participants reported. The country’s hunger for innovation and inspiring stories of Ukrainian scientists overcoming odds to continue their research was a theme of the discussions. “Crisis can be an opportunity,” said one participant, highlighting how Ukrainians have continued to innovate despite being in an active war. Individual participants identified a number of important themes during the workshop, including the following:

Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
  • Elevate science as a top priority. “A strong innovation ecosystem is based on a pillar of excellent science,” said one participant. If we want a science and innovation-based economy in the future, there is a need for science to be elevated to the highest priority. Another participant noted that Ukraine directs only 0.17 percent of its budget to investing in science; this is not enough to support a thriving scientific ecosystem that can compete internationally. Thus, pre-committing funding toward science and innovation may be an effective approach, said one participant.
  • Invest in education to support economic growth. Human resources in STEM fields are a scarce commodity, yet Ukraine is well ahead of Western Europe in science education and continues to gain by working with the Smithsonian, said one participant. However, there is a need for further investment in education. As one participant noted, the government should move on from its focus on investing in wheat to education.
  • Listen to Ukrainians to understand what they need. Several participants confirmed that Ukrainians are best positioned to understand their own needs and articulating priorities for science and innovation. One participant suggested organizing key researchers in the Ukrainian diaspora—and developing recommendations based on their feedback.
  • Coordinate research initiatives and programs. There are many successful scientific initiatives in Ukraine that are being run in parallel and that are not widely known, said one participant. There is a need to organize these activities so that funders and other researchers can learn from each other. Developing a webpage or database of various research efforts in Ukraine could be useful, one participant noted.
  • Take action to bridge the gap between science and innovation and the economy. One participant said that they were perplexed about the parallel conversation between the scientific and innovation community and the commercialization and economic community; there is a need to bridge that gap.
  • Support Ukraine in identifying international reviewers and developing research administration and management skills. Some participants highlighted the Ukrainian request for international reviewers of proposals, offering suggestions about where to identify such reviewers (e.g., NSF IMPRESS-U). Other participants offered to support Ukraine in building its research administration and management skills.
  • Increase co-funding and joint appointment and training opportunities. Participants discussed opportunities to develop joint postdoctoral programs or faculty appointments which can strengthen and build international cooperation. Others discussed creating collaborative research opportunities involving Ukrainian scientists working jointly with foreign scientists. Also, several participants noted the need for student training opportunities that will encourage them to grow in their field.
  • Create flexibility to support researchers. The recent flexibility offered by funders is welcome for Ukrainian researchers who may not have the resources to complete lengthy proposals, said one participant.
  • Ensure scientific freedom to advance science and innovation. Offering scientific freedom to the Ukrainian people will encourage them to return to Ukraine and further their entrepreneurial interests, several participants said.
  • Reform the legal and regulatory framework to advance science and innovation. Participants discussed the need to assess the legal landscape and make it enabling and conducive to science and innovation.
  • Address the basic needs of Ukrainian researchers. Several Ukrainian workshop participants noted that the majority of Ukrainian researchers are still in Ukraine; therefore, it is important to address their basic needs, such as increasing salaries to provide a living wage, offering safe places to work, etc. There is also a need to focus on the human element, including the families of researchers who
Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×

    are affected. When designing initiatives, funders should consider scientists’ personal lives as well, said another participant.

  • Consider long term and systemic changes to support science. It is important to consider the longer term needs of research in Ukraine when making investments, several participants noted. Others called for systemic changes and long-term solutions to support research in Ukraine. Any investment in science should be considered a long term one; 5 years is not enough time to yield results in science and innovation.
  • It is impossible to develop Ukrainian research and innovation if not developing research and innovation in Ukraine. Several participants noted that it is important to focus on supporting researchers and innovators who remain in Ukraine and those Ukrainian and international scholars who are interested in visiting Ukraine for part-time positions and/or short-term visits.

As one participant noted, the discussions from the workshop may be broader than the current Ukraine crisis; and the lessons we are learning today can be scaled up and adapted to countries engaged in future conflicts.

DISCLAIMER This Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief was prepared by Jennifer Saunders as a factual summary of what occurred at the meeting. The statements made are those of the author or individual meeting participants and do not necessarily represent the views of all meeting participants; the planning committee; or the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

PLANNING COMMITTEE Cathy Campbell (Chair), Oleksandra Antoniouk, Jürg Brunnschweiler, Oleksiy Kolezhuk, Jeff Martin, Dmytro Pokhylko, Allison Schwier.

Thank you to the co-organizers of the workshop, the Simons Foundation and ETH Zurich. A special thank you to Yulia Bezvershenko for her contributions to the workshop. Language Exchange Translations, LLC (LEXT) provided interpretation in Ukrainian and English.

STAFF Vaughan Turekian, Executive Director; Franklin Carrero-Martinez, Senior Theme Lead; Micah Lowenthal, Senior Theme Lead; Candace Huntington, Research Associate.

REVIEWERS To ensure that it meets institutional standards for quality and objectivity, this Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief was reviewed by Oleksandra Antoniouk, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and Yaroslav Prytula, Ukrainian Catholic University. Marilyn Baker, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, served as the Review Coordinator. We also thank staff members David Dierksheide and Kelly Robbins for reading and providing helpful comments on this manuscript.

SPONSORS This workshop was supported by the Breakthrough Prize Foundation and the Simons Foundation.

For more information, visit https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/action-group-on-rebuilding-engineering-science-education-and-technology-in-ukraine

SUGGESTED CITATION National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/27825.

Policy and Global Affairs

Copyright 2024 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Rebuilding and Strengthening Ukrainian Science and Innovation in Support of Economic Recovery: Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27825.
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The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has led to widespread devastation which presents acute and long-term challenges for Ukrainian science, education, and technology sectors. To discuss efforts to strengthen the science and innovation system, the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, in partnership with the Simons Foundation and ETH Zurich, convened a workshop with leading experts from around the world representing academia, ministries, industry, philanthropy, and foundations on March 19-20, 2024. This Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief provides a high-level summary of the key discussions among speakers and participants during the workshop.

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