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Page 134
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27842.
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Page 134
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27842.
×
Page 135
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27842.
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Page 136

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

134 Acronyms and Abbreviations AAM advanced air mobility ABP assumption-based planning ANCA Airport Noise and Capacity Act API application programming interface AV autonomous vehicle BEV battery electric vehicle BIL Bipartisan Infrastructure Law BMS battery management system CARB California Air Resources Board CAV connected autonomous vehicle CB-LOC characteristics-based level of concern CEQA California Environmental Quality Act CISA Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency COVID-19 coronavirus disease 2019 CV connected vehicle DAC disadvantaged communities DCFC direct current fast charging DOT department of transportation DSRC direct short-range communications EATM-CERT European Air Traffic Management Computer Emergency Response Team EU European Union EV electric vehicle EVSE electric vehicle supply equipment FDIA false data injection attack FHV for-hire vehicle FOD foreign object debris GBFS General Bikeshare Feed Specification GBNRTC Greater Buffalo Niagara Regional Transportation Council GDPR General Data Protection Regulation GHG greenhouse gas GTFS general transit feed specification HD heavy duty HEV hybrid electric vehicle HTF Highway Trust Fund ICE internal combustion engine IIJA Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act IP Internet protocol

Acronyms and Abbreviations 135   ITC income tax credit LCV light commercial vehicle LiDAR Light Detection and Ranging LOC level of concern LSAV low-speed automated vehicle MaaS mobility as a service MAPC Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Planning Council MD medium duty MDS mobility data specification MFT motor fuel excise tax MITM man-in-the-middle MOD mobility on demand MPO metropolitan planning organization MTA Metropolitan Transportation Authority NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NEVI National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure NIST National Institute for Standards and Technology NYSDOT New York State Department of Transportation ODD operational design domain ODOT Oregon Department of Transportation OEM original equipment manufacturer OMF Open Mobility Foundation OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PBOT Portland Bureau of Transportation PEV plug-in electric vehicle PHEV plug-in hybrid electric vehicle PII personally identifiable information PLDV passenger light-duty vehicle PM particulate material ppb parts per billion QA quality assurance RDM robust decision making RSU roadside unit SAEV shared autonomous electric vehicle SANDAG San Diego Association of Governments SAST strategic assumption surfacing and testing SAV shared autonomous vehicle SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SCMS smart charging management systems SI-LOC signpost indicator level of concern TMIP-EMAT Travel Mode Improvement Program-Exploratory Modeling and Analysis Tool TNC transportation network company TRID Transport Research International Documentation UAM urban air mobility UAS uncrewed aerial system UTM uncrewed traffic management V2I vehicle-to-infrastructure V2V vehicle-to-vehicle VDOT Virginia Department of Transportation

136 Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide VMT vehicle miles traveled VSSA Voluntary Safety Self-Assessment VTOL vertical takeoff and landing WAS wheelchair accessible services WAT wheelchair accessible taxicab ZEV zero-emission vehicle

Next: Appendix A - Analysis of Risk Priorities Across the Full Risk Register »
Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide Get This Book
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 Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide
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Emerging technologies present many potential challenges to state departments of transportation (DOTs) and other agencies that own and manage the existing infrastructure. Significant uncertainty exists about which changes are most likely to occur and where the largest impacts could be, hampering an effective national alignment in policy and approach.

NCHRP Research Report 1090: Risks Related to Emerging and Disruptive Transportation Technologies: A Guide, from TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program, presents a register of risks to state and local transportation agencies and their constituents posed by four emerging technologies: electric vehicles (EVs), connected autonomous vehicles (CAVs), mobility on demand/mobility as a service (MOD/MaaS), and advanced air mobility (AAM).

Supplemental to the report are a PowerPoint presentation describing the research and an implementation plan.

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