National Academies Press: OpenBook

HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking (1995)

Chapter:A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
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A
Individuals Interviewed by the Committee

Richard Aguilar, Jr., Pharm.D.

Caremark Western Medical Specialties

Louis M. Aledort, M.D.

Mt. Sinai Medical Center

Harvey Alter, M.D.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Arthur Amman, M.D.

Pediatric AIDS Foundation

David Aronson, M.D.

George Washington University Medical Center

Thomas M. Asher, Ph.D.

HemaCare Corporation

John Bacich, Jr.

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Llewelys F. Barker, M.D., Ph.D.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH

Val D. Bias

Marc Associates, Inc.

Jonathan Botelho

National Hemophilia Foundation

Joseph Bove, M.D.

Yale University Blood Bank

Edward Brandt, Jr., M.D.

Oklahoma University Health Center

Charles J. Carman, M.D.

Retired

William Coenen

Council of Community Blood Centers

James Crispen, M.D.

Private Practitioner

James W. Curran, M.D., M.P.H.

Centers for Disease Control

Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×

Calvin Dawson

National Hemophilia Foundation

Shelby Dietrich, M.D.

Huntington Hospital Hemophilia Center

Dennis Donohue, M.D.

Private Consultant

Corey Dubin

Committee of Ten Thousand

Michael Dubinsky

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Edgar Engleman, M.D.

Stanford University Blood Center

Jay Epstein, M.D.

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA

Bruce L. Evatt, M.D.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Steve Falter

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA

Frederick Feldman, M.D.

Armour Pharmaceuticals

William Foege, M.D., M.P.H.

Emory University

Boyd Foegel

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA

Donald Francis, M.D.

Genentech

Joseph C. Fratantoni, M.D.

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA

Bruce Furie, M.D.

New England Medical Center

Robert S. Gallo, M.D.

National Cancer Institute, NIH

James J. Goedert, M.D.

National Cancer Institute, NIH

Edward Gompert, M.D.

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

William J. Hammes

Miles, Inc.

Leon W. Hoyer, M.D.

American Red Cross

Petra Jason

Miami, Florida

Carol Kasper, M.D.

Orthopedic Hospital's Hemophilia Treatment Center

Dana Kuhn, M.Div., Ph.D.

Virginia Commonwealth University

Beth Leahy

Armour Pharmaceuticals

Peter H. Levine, M.D.

The Medical Center of Central Massachusetts

Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×

Karen Lipton, J.D.

American Association of Blood Banks

Jeanne M. Lusher, M.D.

Children's Hospital of Michigan

Clyde B. McAuley, M.D.

Alpha Therapeutic Corporation

Jeffrey McCullough, M.D.

University of Minnesota

Merle McPherson, M.D.

Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Harry M. Meyer, M.D.

Private Consultant

Thomas Montgomery

U.S. House of Representatives, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

Carol M. Moore

Miles, Inc.

James Mosley, M.D.

University of Southern California

Milton Mozen, Ph.D.

Miles, Inc.

George Nemo, M.D.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH

June E. Osborn, M.D.

University of Michigan

Peter Page, M.D.

American Red Cross

Paul Parkman, M.D.

Private Consultant

Herbert Perkins, M.D.

Irwin Memorial Blood Bank

Marla S. Persky

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

John Petricciani, M.D.

Genetics Institute

Kenneth R. Pina, Esquire

Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Inc.

Johanna Pindyck, M.D.

Retired, New York Blood Center

Gerald V. Quinnan, Jr.

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

James Reilly

American Blood Resources Association

Harold Roberts, M.D.

University of North Carolina

Michael Rodell, Ph.D.

Private Consultant

Donald Rosenblitt, M.D.

University of North Carolina

Jack Ryan

Miles, Inc.

S. Gerald Sandler, M.D. F.A.C.P.

Georgetown University Hospital

Edward Shanbrom, M.D.

Private Consultant

Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×

Arthur Silvergleid, M.D.

Blood Bank of San Bernadino-Riverside Counties

Arthur R. Thompson, M.D.

Puget Sound Blood Center

Richard Valdez, Sr.

Hemophilia/HIV Peer Association

Jonathan Wadleigh

Committee of Ten Thousand

Charles Wallas, M.D.

American Association of Blood Banks

Timothy M. Westmoreland

U.S. House of Representatives, Subcommittee on Health and the Environment

Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×
Page239
Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×
Page240
Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×
Page241
Suggested Citation:"A Individuals Interviewed by the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1995. HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decisionmaking. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4989.
×
Page242
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During the early years of the AIDS epidemic, thousands of Americans became infected with HIV through the nation's blood supply. Because little reliable information existed at the time AIDS first began showing up in hemophiliacs and in others who had received transfusions, experts disagreed about whether blood and blood products could transmit the disease.

During this period of great uncertainty, decision-making regarding the blood supply became increasingly difficult and fraught with risk. This volume provides a balanced inquiry into the blood safety controversy, which involves private sexual practices, personal tragedy for the victims of HIV/AIDS, and public confidence in America's blood services system.

The book focuses on critical decisions as information about the danger to the blood supply emerged. The committee draws conclusions about what was done—and recommends what should be done to produce better outcomes in the face of future threats to blood safety.

The committee frames its analysis around four critical area:

  • Product treatment—Could effective methods for inactivating HIV in blood have been introduced sooner?
  • Donor screening and referral—including a review of screening to exlude high-risk individuals.
  • Regulations and recall of contaminated blood—analyzing decisions by federal agencies and the private sector.
  • Risk communication—examining whether infections could have been averted by better communication of the risks.
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