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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
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Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations

Workshop Summary

Committee on Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly

Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Health Division of Health Sciences Policy

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C. 1997

Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
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NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

The Institute of Medicine was chartered in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to enlist distinguished members of the appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. In this, the Institute acts under both the Academy's 1863 congressional charter responsibility to be an advisor to the federal government and its own initiative in identifying issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine.

Support for this project was provided by the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, under Contract No. N01-OD-4-2139. The views presented are those of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and are not necessarily those of the funding organization.

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Copyright 1997 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

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The serpent has been a symbol of long life, healing, and knowledge among almost all cultures and religions since the beginning of recorded history. The image adopted as a logotype by the Institute of Medicine is based on a relief carving from ancient Greece, now held by the Staatliche Museen in Berlin.

Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×

COMMITTEE ON PHARMACOKINETICS AND DRUG INTERACTIONS IN THE ELDERLY

LESLIE Z. BENET* (Chair), Professor and Chairman,

Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Francisco

MARK H. BEERS, Senior Director of Geriatrics,

Merck & Co., Inc., West Point, Pennsylvania

D. CRAIG BRATER, Chairman,

Department of Medicine,

Director,

Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Indiana University School of Medicine

DAVID J. GREENBLATT, Professor and Chairman,

Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine

PATRICIA D. KROBOTH, Professor and Chair,

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy

HENRI R. MANASSE, JR.,* Executive Vice President,

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Bethesda, Maryland

MARK MONANE, Director,

Disease State Management—Geriatrics, Merck Medco Managed Care, Montvale, New Jersey

BRUCE POLLOCK, Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and Director,

Geriatric Psychopharmacology Program, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

JANICE B. SCHWARTZ, Professor of Medicine and Chief of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Medicine,

Northwestern University Medical School

ROBERT TAYLOR, Chairman,

Department of Pharmacology, Howard University College of Medicine

RAYMOND WOOSLEY, Chairman,

Department of Pharmacology, Georgetown University Medical Center

Institute of Medicine Staff

CATHARYN T. LIVERMAN, Study Director

CAROLYN E. FULCO, Study Director

CARRIE E. INGALLS, Research Associate

THOMAS WETTERHAN, Administrative Assistant/Research Assistant

AMELIA MATHIS, Project Assistant

CONSTANCE PECHURA, Director,

Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Health

VALERIE P. SETLOW, Director,

Division of Health Sciences Policy

*

Member, Institute of Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
×
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Suggested Citation:"FRONT MATTER." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions in the Elderly and Special Issues in Elderly African-American Populations: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5854.
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Reports in the popular press about the increasing longevity of Americans and the aging of the baby boom generation are constant reminders that the American population is becoming older. Consequently, an issue of growing medical, health policy, and social concern is the appropriate and rational use of medications by the elderly.

Although becoming older does not necessarily correlate with increasing illness, aging is associated with anatomical and physiological changes that affect how medications are metabolized by the body. Furthermore, aging is often related to an increased frequency of chronic illness (often combined with multiple health problems) and an increased use of medications. Thus, a better understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs; of the physiologic responses to those medications; as well as of the interactions among multiple medications is crucial for improving the health of older people.

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