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Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft: Final Report (1997)

Chapter:Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5917.
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Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Charles F. Tiffany (chair) retired as executive vice president of the Boeing Military Airplane Company where he was responsible for the management of several military aircraft programs. His expertise is airframe and propulsion structural design and structural durability and damage tolerance. Since his retirement Mr. Tiffany has been actively involved in the FAA's aging aircraft program and has served on the Technical Oversight Group on Aging Aircraft and the Air Force's Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Satya N. Atluri is Institute Professor and Regents Professor of engineering and director of the Computational Mechanics Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His expertise is in fracture mechanics, computational mechanics, and the analysis of metallic and composite structures for aircraft applications. Dr. Atluri's research has included the analysis of aged and repaired structures and corrosion-fatigue interactions. Dr. Atluri is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Catherine A. Bigelow is manager of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program at the FAA Technical Center. Prior to her present position, Dr. Bigelow spent 15 years at the NASA Langley Research Center. Her primary expertise is in computational mechanics and fatigue and fracture of metallic and composite structures.

Earl W. Briesch is a consultant with Dayton Aerospace Inc. Mr. Briesch is the retired deputy director for requirements of the US Air Force Materiel Command. He has 35 years of experience in logistics management, program management, engineering, and technology on major Air Force weapons systems. He served in senior management positions at Warner-Robins Air Logistics Center with responsibility for major system modifications and depot-level maintenance programs for the F-15, C-141, and the C-130.

Robert J. Bucci is technical consultant at the ALCOA research laboratory. His expertise includes aerospace aluminum alloys, fracture, fatigue, and corrosion. His research concerns in-service degradation of aluminum alloys, fatigue and fracture processes, aging aircraft, materials selection and characterization, and corrosion-fatigue interactions. Dr. Bucci's recent work has concerned the prediction of mechanical performance of aluminum structures with corrosion and multiple-site damage.

Wendy R. Cieslak is manager, Materials Aging and Reliability: Interfaces at Sandia National Laboratories. She is a materials engineer with expertise in corrosion and electrochemistry. Dr. Cieslak's interests include fundamental corrosion processes and corrosion chemistry and her research has concerned electrochemical corrosion, passivation, and advanced battery development.

Eugene E. Covert is T. Wilson Professor of Aeronautics, emeritus, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Covert's research interests are in aircraft design and aerodynamics and he has broad expertise in the design and operation of military aircraft. He served as chief scientist of the Air Force and chair of the recent Air Force Scientific Advisory Board study, Life Extension and Mission Enhancement for Air Force Aircraft, that was a predecessor of this current study. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

B. Boro Djordjevic is associate director of the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Johns Hopkins University and president of Materials and Sensors Technologies, Inc. Prior to holding his current position he was manager of Evaluation and Subsystem Engineering at Martin Marietta Laboratories. His expertise is in materials science and engineering, nondestructive evaluation (ultrasonics, acoustics, optical testing), in situ and smart sensors, and advanced composite materials and structures.

Charles E. Harris is chief engineer, Materials Division at the NASA Langley Research Center. He is also the technical manager of the NASA Aging Aircraft Research Program with research in materials characterization and the mechanics of damage in metal and composite structures. Prior to joining NASA, Dr. Harris was professor of aerospace engineering at Texas A&M University and a structural engineer at Babcock and Wilcox Company. Dr. Harris has broad experience in materials and structures, aircraft structural design, and aging aircraft research.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5917.
×

James W. Mar is professor, emeritus, in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He retired as the Jerome C. Hunsaker Professor of Aerospace Education. His expertise is in the design of aerospace systems such as airplanes and spacecraft, with special interests in structures, aeroelasticity, and materials. He has been a leader in research in aerospace structures and in the use of composite materials in aircraft structure. He is currently chair of the FAA's Technical Oversight Group on Aging Aircraft and has served as the Chief Scientist of the Air Force. Dr. Mar is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

J. Arthur Marceau is senior principal engineer in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group's Materials Technology organization. His experience has been in corrosion of commercial aircraft structures, corrosion-resistant finishes, and structural adhesive bonding. Mr. Marceau was responsible for the inspection and characterization of corrosion in aging commercial aircraft (under Boeing's Aging Fleet Survey Program) and for the development of corrosion prevention and control procedures for the existing fleet as well as design improvements to avoid corrosion in new aircraft design.

Charles Saff is corporate fellow—concept design and development in the Boeing Information, Space, and Defense Systems Group and is responsible for the development and transition of materials and structures technologies into product applications. His expertise includes materials selection, component design, and analysis of metallic, metal-matrix composite, and polymer-matrix composite structures. Mr. Saff has been involved in materials selection and optimization; integrated design models; and the development of methods for structural risk assessment, failure analysis, and repair of structures for several aircraft programs.

Edgar A. Starke, Jr., is Earnest Oglesby Professor of materials science and engineering and University Professor at the University of Virginia. His research concerns the development and characterization of advanced alloys. He has vast experience in aerospace application of aluminum and titanium alloys and in the characterization of fatigue and fracture processes. Dr. Starke has served on NASA's Aeronautical Advisory Committee, chaired NASA's High Speed Research Committee on Materials, and is currently a member of the NRC's National Materials Advisory Board. He is actively involved in the coordination of international research in aging aircraft through NATO's Advisory Group on Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD).

Donald O. Thompson is director, emeritus, of the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. His research interests include materials degradation behavior and quantitative nondestructive evaluation methods and equipment. He has been involved with the FAA's Center for Aviation Systems Reliability at Iowa State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5917.
×
Page111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5917.
×
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Many of the aircraft that form the backbone of the U.S. Air Force operational fleet are 25 years old or older. A few of these will be replaced with new aircraft, but many are expected to remain in service an additional 25 years or more. This book provides a strategy to address the technical needs and priorities associated with the Air Force's aging airframe structures. It includes a detailed summary of the structural status of the aging force, identification of key technical issues, recommendations for near-term engineering and management actions, and prioritized near-term and long-term research recommendations.

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