National Academies Press: OpenBook

Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Research and Development to Improve Civilian Medical Response (1999)

Chapter: Appendix D: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention List of Restricted Agents

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention List of Restricted Agents." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Research and Development to Improve Civilian Medical Response. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6364.
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Page 263

Appendix D
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention List of Restricted Agents

Viruses

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus

Eastern equine encephalitis virus

Ebola viruses

Equine morbillivirus

Lassa fever virus

Marburg virus

Rift Valley fever virus

South American hemorrhagic fever viruses (Junin, Machupo, Sabia, Flexal, Guanarito)

Tick-borne encephalitis complex viruses

Variola major virus (smallpox virus)

Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus

Viruses causing hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Yellow fever virus

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additional Requirements for Facilities Transferring or Receiving Select Agents, 42 CFR Part 72/RIN 0905-AE70. Atlanta: United States Department of Health and Human Services, 1997.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention List of Restricted Agents." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Research and Development to Improve Civilian Medical Response. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6364.
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Page 264

Bacteria

Bacillus anthracis

Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Brucella suis

Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) mallei

Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) pseudomallei

Clostridium botulinum

Francisella tularensis

Yersinia pestis

Coxiella burnetii

Rickettsia prowazekii

Rickettsia rickettsii

Fungi

Coccidioides immitis

Toxins

Abrin

Aflatoxins

Botulinum toxins

Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin

Conotoxins

Diacetoxyscirpenol

Ricin

Saxitoxin

Shigatoxin

Staphylococcal enterotoxins

Tetrodotoxin

T-2 toxin

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention List of Restricted Agents." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Research and Development to Improve Civilian Medical Response. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6364.
×
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention List of Restricted Agents." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Research and Development to Improve Civilian Medical Response. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6364.
×
Page 264
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The threat of domestic terrorism today looms larger than ever. Bombings at the World Trade Center and Oklahoma City's Federal Building, as well as nerve gas attacks in Japan, have made it tragically obvious that American civilians must be ready for terrorist attacks. What do we need to know to help emergency and medical personnel prepare for these attacks? Chemical and Biological Terrorism identifies the R&D efforts needed to implement recommendations in key areas: pre-incident intelligence, detection and identification of chemical and biological agents, protective clothing and equipment, early recognition that a population has been covertly exposed to a pathogen, mass casualty decontamination and triage, use of vaccines and pharmaceuticals, and the psychological effects of terror. Specific objectives for computer software development are also identified. The book addresses the differences between a biological and chemical attack, the distinct challenges to the military and civilian medical communities, and other broader issues. This book will be of critical interest to anyone involved in civilian preparedness for terrorist attack: planners, administrators, responders, medical professionals, public health and emergency personnel, and technology designers and engineers.

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