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Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions (1999)

Chapter:Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×

Appendix B

Participants

The Role of Tests in Higher Education Admissions

December 17–18, 1998

A National Research Council Workshop sponsored by the Board on Testing and Assessment and the Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel

Steering Committee

Christopher F. Edley, Jr., Harvard Law School, BOTA

M.R.C. Greenwood, University of California, Santa Cruz, OSEP

Carlos G. Gutierrez, California State University, L.A., OSEP

Michael W. Kirst, Stanford University; BOTA

Robert L. Linn, University of Colorado, BOTA

John D. Wiley, University of Wisconsin, Madison, OSEP

Presenters

Richard C. Atkinson,* University of California

Hunter Breland, Educational Testing Service

David Breneman, University of Virginia

Nancy Cole, Educational Testing Service

David Conley, University of Oregon

David Cuttino, Tufts University

Stacey Berg Dale, The Andrew Mellon Foundation

Richard Ferguson, American College Testing

Maryanne Fox, North Carolina State University

Dennis Galligani, University of California

*  

Member of BOTA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×

William Hiss, Bates College

Richard Jaeger,* University of North Carolina

Sylvia Johnson, Howard University

Thomas Kane, JFK School of Government, Harvard University

Daniel Koretz, Boston College

Ron Latanision, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Samuel Lucas, University of California, Berkeley

Gary Natriello, Columbia University-Teacher's College

Thomas Parker, Williams College

Meredith Phillips, University of California, Los Angeles

Robert Seltzer, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Audrey Smith, Hampshire College

Debra Stewart, North Carolina State University

Donald Stewart, The College Board

Susan Sturm, University of Pennsylvania

Peter Van Buskirk, Franklin and Marshall College

Linda Wightman, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Warren Willingham, Educational Testing Service

Guests

Kimberly Adedovin, CRESPAR

Brenda Ashford, Association of American Medical Colleges

Kathie Bailey, Association of American Universities

Vicki Barr, Heath Resource Center

Lina Bell, George Washington University

Lois Bergeisen, Association of American Medical Colleges

David Berkowitz, U.S. Department of Education

Susan Bowers, U.S. Department of Education

Ellen Burbank, Pew Charitable Trusts

Janell Byrd, NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Donald Carstensen, ACT, Inc.

Duncan Chaplin, Urban Institute

Ella Cleveland, Association of American Medical Colleges

Arthur Coleman, U.S. Department of Education

Bridget Curran, National Governors' Association

Susan Duby, National Science Foundation

Lisa Evans, U.S. Department of Justice

John Folkins, University of Iowa

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×

Heather Roberts Fox, American Psychological Association

John Fry, U.S. Department of Education

Terry Fuller, Wakefield High School

Sandra Garcia, U.S. Department of Education

Dale Gough, AACRAO

John Hackett, Association of American Medical Colleges

Jane Hannaway, Urban Institute

Eileen Hanrahan, U.S. Department of Education

Patrick Hayashi, University of California

Kristen Huff, Association of American Medical Colleges

Gerunda Hughes, Howard University

Ellen Julian, Association of American Medical Colleges

Ernest Kimmel, Educational Testing Service

Judy Koenig Association of American Medical Colleges

Adina Kole, U.S. Department of Education

Rebecca Kopriva, U.S. Department of Education

Carole Lacampagne, U.S. Department of Education

Daniel Levin, Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges

Cathy Lewis, U.S. Department of Education

Sharon Lewis, Council of Great City Schools

Jo-Anne Manswell, CRESPAR

Wayne Martin, Council of Chief State School Officers

Patricia McAllister, Educational Testing Service

Ron Millar, National Research Council

Daniel Minchew, ACT, Inc.

John Moore, U.S. Department of Justice

Jill Morrison, National Women's Law Center

Casey Mulqueen, American Institutes for Research

Jeryl Mumpower, National Science Foundation

Maureen Murphy, Math Tech, Inc.

Karen Kovacs North, University of California, Santa Cruz

Beth O'Neil, Law School Admission Council

Leroy Outlaw, Lake Braddock Secondary Schools

Peter Pashley, Law School Admission Council

Peggy Peagler, CRESPAR

Nancy Petersen, ACT, Inc.

Robert Schaeffer, National Center for Fair and Open Testing

Cynthia Board Schmeiser, ACT, Inc.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×

Stephen Schreiber, Law School Admission Council

Theodore Shaw, NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Nevzer Stacey, U.S. Department of Education

David Sweet, U.S. Department of Education

William Taylor, Attorney at Law

Sheila Thompson, CRESPAR,

Andrea Thornton, Law School Admission Council

William Trent, University of Illinois

Gabrielo Uro, Council of Great City Schools

Rebekah Tosado, U.S. Department of Education

Joan Van Tol, Law School Admission Council

Michael Wallace, CRESPAR

Kimberly West-Faulcon, NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Heshima White, U.S. Department of Justice

Deborah Wilds, American Council on Education

Adriane Williams, Council of Great City Schools

Lauress Wise,* Human Resources Research Organization

NRC Staff

Marilyn Baker, Office of Science and Engineering Personnel

Stephen Baldwin, Board on Testing and Assessment

Alexandra Beatty, Board on Testing and Assessment

Meryl Bertenthal, Board on Testing and Assessment

Naomi Chudowsky, Board on Testing and Assessment

Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Center for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education

Michael Feuer, Director, Board on Testing and Assessment

Cadelle Hemphill, Board on Testing and Assessment

Michele Kipke, Division on Social and Economic Studies

Lee Jones, Board on Testing and Assessment

Charlotte Kuh, Director, Office of Science and Engineering Personnel

Karen Mitchell, Board on Testing and Assessment

Patricia Morison, Board on Testing and Assessment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×
Page41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×
Page42
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×
Page43
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Participants, Workshop on the Role of Tests in Higher Education Admission." National Research Council. 1999. Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9632.
×
Page44
Myths and Tradeoffs: The Role of Tests in Undergraduate Admissions Get This Book
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More than 8 million students enrolled in 4-year, degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the United States in 1996. The multifaceted system through which these students applied to and were selected by the approximately 2,240 institutions in which they enrolled is complex, to say the least; for students, parents, and advisers, it is often stressful and sometimes bewildering. This process raises important questions about the social goals that underlie the sorting of students, and it has been the subject of considerable controversy.

The role of standardized tests in this sorting process has been one of the principal flashpoints in discussions of its fairness. Tests have been cited as the chief evidence of unfairness in lawsuits over admissions decisions, criticized as biased against minorities and women, and blamed for the fierce competitiveness of the process. Yet tests have also been praised for their value in providing a common yardstick for comparing students from diverse schools with different grading standards.

Myths and Tradeoffs identifies and corrects some persistent myths about standardized admissions tests and highlight some of the specific tradeoffs that decisions about the uses of tests entail; presents conclusions and recommendations about the role of tests in college admissions; and lays out several issues about which information would clearly help decision makers, but about which the existing data are either insufficient or need synthesis and interpretation. This report will benefit a broad audience of college and university officials, state and other officials and lawmakers, and others who are wrestling with decisions about admissions policies, definitions of merit, legal actions, and other issues.

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