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Suggested Citation:"B Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
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B

Acknowledgments

The Panel on Dietary Antioxidants and Related Compounds, the Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients, the Subcommittee on Interpretation and Uses of Dietary Reference Intakes, the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, and the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) staff are grateful for the time and effort of the many contributors to this report and the workshops and meetings leading up to the report. Through openly sharing their considerable expertise and different outlooks, these individuals and organizations brought clarity and focus to the challenging task of defining dietary antioxidants and developing vitamin C, vitamin E, β-carotene, and selenium DRIs for humans. The list below mentions those individuals with whom we worked closely, but many others also deserve our heartfelt thanks. These individuals, whose names we do not know, made important contributions to the report by offering suggestions and opinions at the many professional meetings and workshops the committee members attended. The panel, subcommittee, and committee members, as well as FNB staff, thank the following named (as well as unnamed) individuals and organizations:

INDIVIDUALS

G. H. Anderson

Douglas Balentine

Adrianne Bendich

Bernice Berg

Hans Biesalski

Jeffrey Blumberg

Luke Bucci

Graham Burton

Mary Ellen Camire

Larry Clark

Steven Clinton

William Cohn

Suggested Citation:"B Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
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Paul Connett

John Cordaro

Michael Dourson

Gary Flamm

Balz Frei

Bernard Goldstein

Gary Goodman

E. Robert Greenberg

Roger Hammond

Suzanne Harris

John Hathcock

Harri Hemilä

Max Horwitt

Debra Jahner

Carol Johnston

John Landrum

Orville Levander

Mark Levine

Bernadette Marriott

Thomas McClure

Simin Meydani

Anna Moses

Alanna Moshfegh

Gilbert Omenn

Lester Packer

Sharon Ross

Robert Russell

Etta Saltos

Helmut Sies

Max Snodderly

Thressa Stadtman

Dan Steffen

Manfred Steiner

Roger Sunde

Thomas Tozer

Diane Tribble

George Truscott

Ron Walker

FEDERAL PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE

Barbara Bowman

Elizabeth Castro

Margaret Cheney

Carolyn Clifford

Paul Coates

Rebecca Costello

Kathleen Ellwood

Nancy Ernst

Peter Fischer

Elizabeth Frazao

Karl Friedl

Nancy Gaston

Jay Hirschman

Van Hubbard

Clifford Johnson

Christine Lewis

Jean Lloyd

Melvin Mathias

Linda Meyers

Esther Myers

Cynthia Ogden

Susan Pilch

Pamela Starke-Reed

Jacqueline Wright

Elizabeth Yetley

DRI CORPORATE DONOR FUND REPRESENTATIVES

Rodney Ausich

Kati Chevaux

David Cook

Mark Dreher

Timothy Jacobson

Maureen Lennon

David Mastroianni

Debra Ponder

Vishwa Singh

Walter Whitehill

Cindy Yablonski

Suggested Citation:"B Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×

ORGANIZATIONS

American Academy of Neurology

American Academy of Pediatrics

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

American Dietetic Association

American Society for Nutrition Sciences

American Medical Association

Canadian Paediatric Society

Canadian Society for Nutritional Sciences

Center for Science in the Public Interest

Council for Responsible Nutrition

The Dannon Institute

Federation of American Scientists for Experimental Biology

Health Canada

Institute of Food Technologists

Interagency Human Nutrition Research Council

International Life Sciences Institute

Life Sciences Research Organization

National Institute for Nutrition, Canada

Suggested Citation:"B Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×
Page413
Suggested Citation:"B Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×
Page414
Suggested Citation:"B Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×
Page415
Next: C Dietary Intake Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), 1988–1994 »
Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids Get This Book
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This volume is the newest release in the authoritative series of quantitative estimates of nutrient intakes to be used for planning and assessing diets for healthy people. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) is the newest framework for an expanded approach developed by U.S. and Canadian scientists.

This book discusses in detail the role of vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and the carotenoids in human physiology and health. For each nutrient the committee presents what is known about how it functions in the human body, which factors may affect how it works, and how the nutrient may be related to chronic disease.

Dietary Reference Intakes provides reference intakes, such as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs), for use in planning nutritionally adequate diets for different groups based on age and gender, along with a new reference intake, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL), designed to assist an individual in knowing how much is "too much" of a nutrient.

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