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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids (2000)

Chapter:E Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1993, 1995

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Suggested Citation:"E Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1993, 1995." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×

E

Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1993, 1995

TABLE E-1 Dietary Vitamin C Intake (mg) of Adults Aged 19–74 Years: Mean and Selected Percentiles, Nova Scotia and Québec, Canada

Sexa and Age, y

Number of Respondents

Selected Percentiles

   

Mean

5th

M, 19–30

536

123

32.0

Standard error

   

3.3

M, 31–50

724

96

25.0

Standard error

   

4.0

M, 51–70

663

88

23.0

Standard error

   

4.6

M, 71–74

149

97

18.0

Standard error

   

3.1

F, 19–30

548

105

18.0

Standard error

   

1.9

F, 31–50

826

88

16.0

Standard error

   

1.6

F, 51–70

657

105

20.0

Standard error

   

2.7

F, 71–74

148

83

19.0

Standard error

   

7.6

a M = male, F = female.

SOURCE: Nova Scotia Heart Health Program. 1993. Report of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey. Nova Scotia Department of Health, Health and Welfare Canada; Santé Québec. 1995. Les Québécoises et les Québécois Mangent-Ils Mieux? Rapport de l'Enquête Québécoise sur la Nutrition, 1990. Montréal: Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux, Gouvernement du Québec.

Suggested Citation:"E Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1993, 1995." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×

10th

25th

50th

75th

90th

95th

99th

42.0

59.0

83.0

114.0

143.0

159.0

210.0

2.5

1.7

2.6

3.2

4.1

5.6

12.0

37.0

54.0

74.0

100.0

120.0

136.0

162.0

1.4

2.3

2.3

2.7

3.5

4.8

7.2

35.0

44.0

66.0

97.0

127.0

145.0

234.0

3.0

2.2

4.6

4.8

4.4

9.3

30.0

22.0

38.0

72.0

119.0

182.0

207.0

273.0

2.7

5.8

10.0

18.0

18.0

26.0

40.0

25.0

43.0

74.0

105.0

139.0

158.0

210.0

2.1

1.9

2.9

3.5

4.5

7.2

16.0

21.0

36.0

61.0

104.0

152.0

183.0

238.0

1.6

1.9

4.0

4.4

11.0

7.7

23.0

27.0

46.0

83.0

116.0

158.0

199.0

279.0

2.8

3.5

5.2

6.9

8.3

16.0

39.0

27.0

43.0

70.0

95.0

115.0

139.0

198.0

4.8

4.4

7.0

5.2

11.0

22.0

27.0

Suggested Citation:"E Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1993, 1995." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×
Page438
Suggested Citation:"E Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1993, 1995." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9810.
×
Page439
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This volume is the newest release in the authoritative series of quantitative estimates of nutrient intakes to be used for planning and assessing diets for healthy people. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) is the newest framework for an expanded approach developed by U.S. and Canadian scientists.

This book discusses in detail the role of vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and the carotenoids in human physiology and health. For each nutrient the committee presents what is known about how it functions in the human body, which factors may affect how it works, and how the nutrient may be related to chronic disease.

Dietary Reference Intakes provides reference intakes, such as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs), for use in planning nutritionally adequate diets for different groups based on age and gender, along with a new reference intake, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL), designed to assist an individual in knowing how much is "too much" of a nutrient.

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