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Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop (2000)

Chapter:Appendix A Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
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APPENDIX
A

Workshop Agenda

Workshop on Measurement of and Research on Time Use

National Academy of Sciences

Green Building, Room 104

2001 Wisconsin Avenue, NW

Washington, DC

May 27-28, 1999

Thursday, May 27, 1999

9:00 - 9:15

Welcome and Introductions

Julie DaVanzo, RAND

9:15-12:00

Session 1: Research on Time Use: Setting the Context

Chair: William Nordhaus, Yale University

9:15-10:00

Paper 1: Time Use Data: Analytic Framework, Descriptive Findings, and Measurement Issues

Author: F. Thomas Juster, University of Michigan

10:00-10:45

Paper 2: Notes on Theories of Time Use

Author: Robert Pollak, Washington University

10:45-11:00

Break

11:00-12:00

Session Discussion Time

Discussants:

Jack Triplett, Brookings Institution

Nancy Folbre, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×

1:00-3:00

Session 2: Determinants of Time Use: Applications of Time Use Data

Chair: Joseph Altonji, Northwestern University

1:00-1:35

Paper 1: The Decision to Allocate Time Between Market and Non-Market Activities

Author: Linda Waite, University of Chicago

Discussant: Joseph Altonji, Northwestern University

1:35-2:10

Paper 2: Family Reading to Young Children: Social Desirability and Cultural Biases in Reporting

Author: Sandra Hofferth, Institute for Social Research,

University of Michigan

Discussant: Suzanne Bianchi, University of Maryland

2:10-2:45

Paper 3: Time Use by and for Older Adults

Authors:

A. Regula Herzog, University of Michigan

Martha Hill, University of Michigan

J. Thomas Juster, University of Michigan

Discussant: Daniel Hamermesh, University of Texas, Austin

2:45-3:00

Public Policy Implications

Discussant: Rebecca Blank, Council of Economic Advisers

3:00-3:15

Break

3:15-3:50

Session 3: Accounting for Nonmarketed Household Production Within a National Accounts Framework

Chair: Joseph Altonji, Northwestern University Authors:

J. Steven Landefeld, Bureau of Economic Analysis

Stephanie McCulla, Bureau of Economic Analysis

Discussant: Dale Jorgenson, Harvard University

3:50-5:20

Session 4: Conceptual Issues in Measuring Time Use—A Roundtable Discussion

Chair: Robert Michael, University of Chicago

Participants:

William Nordhaus, Yale University

Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Center for Young

Children & Families, Columbia University

Francisco Samaniego, University of California, Davis

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×

 

Roundtable Topics:

What aspects of time use are worth measuring?

Can the aspect of quality of time use be measured?

How can the problem of simultaneous activities be handled?

How can statistical models help address the 24 hour constraint and other time use survey issues?

Friday, May 28, 1999

9:00-11:30

Session 5: Approaches to Measuring Time Use

Chair: Norman Bradburn, National Opinion Research Center

9:00-9:30

Paper 1: Methodological Features of the Time Diary Method

Author: John Robinson, University of Maryland

9:30-10:00

Paper 2: Experience Sampling Method: Current and Potential Research Applications

Author: Jiri Zuzanek, University of Waterloo, Canada

10:00-10:15

Break

10:15-10:45

Paper 3: An International Perspective to Collecting Time Use Data

Author: Michael Bittman, University of New South Wales, Australia

10:45-11:30

Open Discussion Time

Moderator: Norman Bradburn, National Opinion

Research Center

Discussant: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, University of Chicago

12:30-2:30

Session 6: A Report on the Feasibility of Conducting a Time-Use Survey

Chair: Francisco Samaniego, University of California, Davis

Author: BLS Time Use Survey Working Group Michael Horrigan, Chair

Discussants:

Lorna Bailie, Statistics Canada

Nancy Folbre, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Daniel Hamermesh, University of Texas, Austin

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×

2:30-2:45

Break

2:45 - 3:45

Session 7: Where Do We Go from Here?—Roundtable Discussion on Future Research Priorities

Chair: Julie DaVanzo, RAND

Participants:

Katharine Abraham, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Norman Bradburn, National Opinion Research Center

William Nordhaus, Yale University

4:00

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×
Page69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×
Page71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2000. Time-Use Measurement and Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9866.
×
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One of the most substantial policy changes in the past decade was the elimination of the main social welfare program for poor families, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, ending the entitlement to cash benefits and replacing it with a policy emphasizing work. A question relevant for understanding the consequences of this policy change is how the time allocation among work and family care activities of poor families has changed.

President Clinton's proposed budget for fiscal 2001 includes funds for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to develop a survey to measure how Americans spend their time (U.S. Department of Labor, 2000). BLS has already explored the feasibility of such a survey. In 1997, a pilot study that collected time-use data for a sample of Americans was conducted, and the results of that study were presented at a 1997 conference sponsored by BLS and the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. Using knowledge gained from the pilot study and the conference, BLS published a report on the feasibility of a national time-use survey and developed a proposal to conduct the survey.

Time-Use Measurement and Research is a summary of a workshop convened to consider data and methodological issues in measuring time use. This report discusses why time-use data are needed, highlighting many of policy and behavioral applications of time-use data. It also summarizes conceptual issues covered during the workshop, discusses a framework for how individuals and households allocate their time, and comments on some conceptual issues in measuring time use.

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