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Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites (2000)

Chapter:Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×

APPENDIX C

Committee Information Gathering Meetings

The committee and subgroups of it conducted this study in part through meetings and site visits. The preponderance of meetings were for the purpose of gathering information through presentations by and discussions with representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), its contractors, and other invited guests, followed by discussion among the committee members. All of the information gathering meetings were open to the public, and members of the public were given the opportunity to speak to the committee. A few meetings were closed to all but committee members and National Research Council staff; these sessions enabled free and critical discussion of findings and conclusions of the study as the committee prepared its reports. An additional means of communication used by the committee was conference calls among subgroup members (3 to 5 of the committee's 15 members) to plan site visits, clarify information, and coordinate preparation of reports for the full committee. The calls, having been numerous, are not included in the list below, which gives the dates and locations of the meetings, presentations received, and field trips taken.

February 27-28, 1997, Irvine, CA

Work Conducted by Resources for the Future (RFF) on Long-Term Stewardship at DOE Sites—James Werner, Director, Strategic Planning and Analysis, DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM-24)

Institutional Controls at DOE Nuclear Complex Sites—John Pendergrass, Senior Attorney at the Environmental Law Institute (ELI)

May 7-9, 1997, Washington, DC

National Research Council Studies Being Conducted for DOE/EM Concerning Technology Development—K.T. Thomas, National Research Council

Closure Issues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee —Margaret Wilson and Richard Ketele

Closure Issues at Hanford, Richland, Washington—Rich Holten

Closure Issues at Pinellas, Florida—Craig Scott

Closure Issues at the Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada—Tom Longo

Work Conducted by Resources for the Future (RFF) on Long-Term Stewardship at DOE Sites—Kate Probst, RFF

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Policy on Closure and Institutional Controls—Ken Lovelace and Sharon Frey, EPA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
July 28-29, 1997, Woods Hole, MA

Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Managed for DOE by Oak Ridge National Laboratory—Al Johnson, DOE Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40)

Closure and Post-Closure of Hazardous Waste Management Units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)—Travis Wagner, SAIC

Brownfield Cleanup Work in Chicago, Illinois—James Van der Kloot, EPA

Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks at DOE Sites—Bob Bernero, retired from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a consultant to the committee

September 10-12, 1997, Las Vegas, NV, and Nevada Test Site, Mercury, NV

Introductions and Site Overviews—Terry Vaeth and Carl Gertz, DOE-Nevada

End State for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Soil Contamination and Remediation—Monica Sanchez, DOE-Nevada

Source Terms from Nuclear Test Events—Joe Thompson, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Source Terms from Waste Management Activities—Joseph Ginanni, DOE-Nevada

Environmental Monitoring—George McNeil and Robert Bangerter, DOE-Nevada

Groundwater Model Used at NTS to Predict Migration of Contaminants —Rick Waddell, HSI GeoTrans, Inc.

An Independent Site Risk Assessment—Don Baepler, University of Nevada, Nevada Risk Assessment Management Program (NRAMP)

Comments from the Public—Bob Loux, Executive Director of the Nevada State Nuclear Waste Project Office

The committee visited the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the proposed high-level waste site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

November 4-5, 1997, Hanford Site, Richland, WA

Hanford Environmental Restoration Long-Range Plan—Rich Holten, DOE-Richland

Hanford Geology and Hydrology—Karl Fecht, Bechtel

Land Use Planning—Tom Fen, DOE Richland

Remediation Actions Planned for the Hanford 100 Area—Nancy Werdel, DOE-Richland

Burial Ground Strategy for the Hanford 200 Area—Jeff James and Brian Foley, Bechtel

Groundwater Protection Management Plan and the Monitoring and Analysis Program—Mike Thompson and Ron Smith, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Comments from the Public—Ralph Patt, Oregon State Department of Energy; Barbara Harper, representing Native Americans; and Jack Donnelly, Washington State Department of Ecology

The meeting was followed by a visit to the following facilities on the Hanford Site: 200 Area Hanford Barrier, 200 Area Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), and N Reactor.

March 4-6, 1998, Tucson, AZ

The committee, working with representatives from DOE and the Waste Management 1998 (WM'98) Program Planning Committee, organized and conducted the Closure and Institutional Controls Workshop at the WM'98.

April 14, 1998, Santa Barbara, CA

Two committee members met with Lorne G. Everett, Chief Research Hydrologist and Vice President, ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller, Inc., and Director of the Vadose Zone Monitoring Laboratory, University of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×

California at Santa Barbara. Subjects discussed included performance monitoring, performance demonstration, and interface modeling and monitoring for the vadose zone. The subgroup also visited Dr. Everett 's vadose zone laboratory at the university.

April 20-22, 1998, Oak Ridge, TN

Before this meeting, several members participated in a half-day tour hosted by site representatives to observe locations that provide key background into the geological and hydrological features of the site. In addition, the members went on a field trip to several of the reservation facilities having relevance to near-term future uses and stewardship.

Site Closure Plans Such as Residual Hazards, Reindustrialization, the Watershed-Scale Approach to Cleanup Decisions, and Long-Term Water Use Restrictions—Rod Nelson, Bechtel/Jacobs

Near-Term Objectives, Future Land Use, and Long-Term Stewardship Requirements—Robert Sleeman and Charles Spoons, DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO)

Reindustrialization of Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP; Formerly K-25) Through the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET)—Susan Cange, ORO

Data Available on Soil and Groundwater Contamination and Its Remediation —Ron Kirk, ORO

Burial Grounds at Bear Valley, and Hydrology and Closure and Post Closure Groundwater Monitoring for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek —Karen Catlett and Margaret Wilson, ORO

Land Restriction—Certified Realty Specialists Mildred Ferve and Shirley Kates, ORO

Environmental Remediation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) —Ralph Skinner and Kavanough Mims, ORO

Comments from the Public—Bill Pardue, Chair, Site Specific Advisory Board; Al Brooks, Local Oversight Committee; Jim Phelps, Environment News and former employee at ORNL; Doug McCoy, Tennessee State Department of Environment and Conservation; James Hill, Local President, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP); Susan Gawarecki, Executive Director of the Local Oversight Committee; and Cheryll Dyer, Coalition for a Healthy Environment

August 24-25, 1998, Grand Junction Project Office, Grand Junction, CO

Introductions—Jack Tillman, Director, Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO)

Grand Junction Project Office Responsibilities and Approach—Russel Edge, DOE GRPO

Records Management, Institutional Controls, and Site Performance Validation—Russel Edge, DOE GJPO

Following the meeting, members of the committee participated in a tour of the Cheney Disposal Cell and the Rifle, CO, closed UMTRA cell.

October 5, 1998, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, OH

The meeting was preceded by a walking and driving tour of the site.

Introductions and Background Information—Oba Vincent, DOE, Dick Neff, DOE Contractor, and Richard Church, Mayor of Miamisburg, OH

Mound 2000—Art Kleinrath, DOE Ohio

Transition Schedule—Sue Smiley, DOE Ohio

Post Remediation Control Systems—Randy Tormy, DOE

Future Plans—Dennis Bird, Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation (MMCIC)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
October 5, 1998, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ross, OH

Site Overview—Dennis Carr

Site Geology/Hydrogeology/Nature and Extent—Bill Hertel, Fluor Daniel

Remedy Selection/Setting of Cleanup Objectives—Marc Jewett, Fluor Daniel

Final Land Use/Natural Resources—Terry Hagen, Fluor Daniel

Fate and Transport Modeling/Statistics—J.D. Chiou, Fluor Daniel

Long-Term Monitoring—Mark Cherry, Fluor Daniel

The meeting was followed by a walking and driving tour of the site.

November 4-5, 1998, Washington, DC

Environmental Law Institute (ELI) Case Studies—Jim McElfish, ELI

Natural Attenuation/Intrinsic Remediation—Steve Golian, DOE/EM, and Jackie MacDonald, National Research Council

January 8, 1999, Grand Junction Project Office, Grand Junction, CO

A revisit to this office to discuss information management and record keeping.

Records Management, Institutional Controls, and Site Performance Validation—Russel Edge, DOE GJPO

April 28, 1999, Hanford Site, Richland, WA

Tour of the Hanford Site included the 100 Area burial grounds, B Reactor, K Basins, N Springs, old town sites, 200 Area tank farms, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF).

Composite Analysis—Charles Kincaid, Pacific Northwest National Lab

Vadose Zone Project—Mike Graham, Bechtel Hanford Inc., and Mike Thompson, DOE Richland

Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement—Bill Edwards

Office of River Protection—Bill Edwards, DOE Richland

Paths to Closure and Stewardship—Jim Dailey, DOE Richland

Comments from the Public—Doug Sherwood, Region 10, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Dib Goswami, Washington State Department of Ecology; Barbara Harper, Yakama Nation

May 11-12, 1999, Augusta, GA, and Savannah River Site, SC

This meeting was preceded by a tour of the Savannah River Site, including stops at M-Area, Old F Seepage Basin, Burial Ground Complex, H Groundwater Treatment Unit, and Rainbow Bay—Jerry Nelson, Dean Hoffman.

Savannah River Operations Office (SROO) Welcome—Frank McCoy, Deputy Manager, SROO

Environmental Perspective—Tom Heenan, SROO

Land Use and Forest Services—Chris Noah, Chuck Borup, and Steve Stine, U.S. Forest Service

Environmental Monitoring—Bob Lorenz

Data Availability—Charles Murphy

Public Involvement—Mary Flora

Tank Closures—Larry Ling

Groundwater Modeling Overview—Mary Harris, Greg Flach

Savannah River Site Composite Analysis—Jim Cook, Elmer Wilhite

Technology—Sharon Robinson

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×

Future Missions—Robert Meadors, SROO

Public Comment

June 9, 1999, Washington, DC

Industry Experience in Remediation, Institutional Controls, Regulatory Compliance, etc.—Edmund B. Frost, Attorney at Law, Leonard, Hurt, Frost & Lilly

November 15, 1999, Washington, DC

DOE/EM Long-Term Stewardship Program—James Werner and Andrew Duran, Office of Environmental Management.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
Page120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
Page121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
Page122
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
Page123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Committee Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9949.
×
Page124
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It is now becoming clear that relatively few U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites will be cleaned up to the point where they can be released for unrestricted use. "Long-term stewardship" (activities to protect human health and the environment from hazards that may remain at its sites after cessation of remediation) will be required for over 100 of the 144 waste sites under DOE control (U.S. Department of Energy, 1999). After stabilizing wastes that remain on site and containing them as well as is feasible, DOE intends to rely on stewardship for as long as hazards persist—in many cases, indefinitely. Physical containment barriers, the management systems upon which their long-term reliability depends, and institutional controls intended to prevent exposure of people and the environment to the remaining site hazards, will have to be maintained at some DOE sites for an indefinite period of time.

The Committee on Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes finds that much regarding DOE's intended reliance on long-term stewardship is at this point problematic. The details of long-term stewardship planning are yet to be specified, the adequacy of funding is not assured, and there is no convincing evidence that institutional controls and other stewardship measures are reliable over the long term. Scientific understanding of the factors that govern the long-term behavior of residual contaminants in the environment is not adequate. Yet, the likelihood that institutional management measures will fail at some point is relatively high, underscoring the need to assure that decisions made in the near term are based on the best available science. Improving institutional capabilities can be expected to be every bit as difficult as improving scientific and technical ones, but without improved understanding of why and how institutions succeed and fail, the follow-through necessary to assure that long-term stewardship remains effective cannot reliably be counted on to occur.

Long-Term Institutional Management of U.S. Department of Energy Legacy Waste Sites examines the capabilities and limitations of the scientific, technical, and human and institutional systems that compose the measures that DOE expects to put into place at potentially hazardous, residually contaminated sites.

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