National Academies Press: OpenBook

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education (2000)

Chapter: Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols

« Previous: Appendix B: Focus Group Summaries
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
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Appendix C

Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

Focus Group Protocol

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching

Focus Group Questions

Tell me about your current position? What is it and how long have you been in it? [This is an icebreaker: participants will be grad students or postdocs]

What are your career aspirations?

What do you find attractive about the career you aspire to? Unattractive?

Right now, what do you think are your chances of realizing your aspirations?

What are the obstacles to realizing these aspirations?

Think back to when you first started college and when you first started graduate school. What were your career aspirations at each of these times? If you have changed your aspirations, what caused you to change?

Have you ever considered a career other than in a university, such as in industry (biotechnology, pharmaceutical) computers, science writing, law school, or teaching?

What is attractive about these careers?

Probes [Less time in postdoc]

[Better pay and benefits]

[Increase in authority]

[No need to write grants]

[Job stability]

[Can have a life]

What is unattractive about these careers?

Probes [Out of the academic research loop]

[Need more time as a postdoc]

[Not interested in applied research or teaching]

[Am not interested in administration]

[Wouldn't want someone telling me what to do]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

What are the obstacles to pursuing these alternatives?

Probes [Lack of jobs]

[Loss of identity]

[Easy to get taken-in]

[Risks associated with working for start-up companies]

[Would need substantial training (for computers, law, teacher education]

Have you ever considered a career as a secondary school science or mathematics teacher? If yes, why? If not, why not?

What might be attractive about such a position?

Probes [Enjoy teaching]

[Enjoy working with young people]

[Would enjoy teaching in a magnet school for science & technology]

[Would be productive way to use my science/math knowledge]

[Would enjoy contributing to the improvement of science and math education in the United States]

[Rediscover general interest in science]

[Community research projects]

[Development of pedagogical skills]

[Potential summer opportunities: teaching, research, vacation]

[Nice alternative to research track and would get me out of postdoc limbo]

What makes this position unattractive to you?

Probes [Am only interested in basic research]

[Material is boring]

[Loss of status]

[Peer disapproval]

[Colleagues are not as stimulating]

[Don't want to work with young people]

[Don't like teaching]

[Would have to manage a classroom and discipline students]

[Would need additional teacher training]

[Low salary compared to university-level academics]

What are the obstacles to pursuing a position as a secondary school teacher?

Probes [Don't know where the jobs are]

[Need state certification]

[Would need extra training to learn to teach]

[Would only work in magnet schools or schools for gifted children]

[May get kicked-out of graduate program if I leave the research track]

[Can't afford it because of student debt—and other alternatives careers would pay more]

[Facing potential rejections by colleagues in the secondary school (either faculty or administrators]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

Would you consider taking such a position for a five-year commitment?

Probes [5-years is too long, I'd never be able to get back into basic research]

[5-years is enough time]

[Would only do this as a permanent career change]

[Would only consider it if I were associated with a research program]

What incentives or special arrangements would be required to attract you to a secondary school teaching position? Follow-up probes:

  1. Certification:

What is your perception of the certification process for secondary school teaching in your state?

For teacher certification, most states require teacher education courses and a passing score on basic skills and/or subject matter examinations. Would you consider secondary school teaching if you could satisfy the teacher education requirement by: (see handout)

  1. Compensation:

What career options would you be willing to consider based on the following salaries for professional positions and your perception of the chances of your obtaining one of these positions? (see state-specific handouts)

What other aspects of compensation, besides salary, might sway your decision?

Probes [Summer fellowships for research]

[Student loan repayment]

[Reimbursement for relocation costs]

[Benefits]

  1. Work environment: What characteristics of your work environment would be especially important to you in a secondary school teaching position?

Probes [Type of school (e.g., science/math magnet)]

[Age of students]

[Ability to job share]

[Ability to have job security]

[Availability of lab equipment or science kits]

[Special summer programs (for teaching, professional development, research)]

[Ability to contribute to curriculum development]

[Ability to do research]

[Other]

Would you consider taking a position with a school district or state department of education in science or mathematics curriculum development? If yes, why? If not, why not?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

What might be attractive about such a position?

Probes [Administrative responsibility]

[Actions and decisions have big impact]

[Can set policy]

What might be unattractive about such a position?

Probes [Completely removed from research]

[Would waste time spent in graduate school]

[No interest in administration or policy work]

[Would rather work with scientists]

What are the obstacles to pursuing such a position?

Probes [New and difficult network to enter]

[Requires new skills and abilities]

[Others would not accept me because I'm primarily a scientist, not an educator

[Would be frustrating to rise through the ranks]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

ATTACHMENTS

Teacher Education Requirements

For teacher certification, most states require teacher education courses and a passing score on basic skills and/or subject matter examinations. Would you consider secondary school teaching if you could satisfy the teacher education requirement by:

[For graduate students]

  • Taking teacher education courses during graduate school to obtain certification while completing Ph.D. requirements?

[For all]

  • Taking teacher education courses after your Ph.D. award and before you started teaching?

  • Completing teacher education courses within a specified time period while you begin secondary school teaching?

  • Passing an examination without having to take extra teacher education courses?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

New Jersey

Position

Salary

Average beginning salary for teacher in New Jersey

$28,039

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Paterson, NJ

37,485

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Paterson, NJ

69,076

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Jersey City, NJ

41,600

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Jersey City, NJ

75,500

   

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 0 years experience

26,256

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 7 years experience

41,268

   

Average salary for instructor at Bergen Community College

38,900

Average salary for assistant professor at Bergen Community College

48,800

Average salary for full professor at Bergen Community College

78,400

   

Average salary for instructor at Rutgers University (New Brunswick)

32,800

Average salary for asst. professor at Rutgers University (New Brunswick)

50,600

Average salary for full professor at Rutgers University (New Brunswick)

94,800

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

North Carolina

Position

Salary

Average beginning salary for teacher in North Carolina

$21,136

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Durham, NC

28,666

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Durham, NC

49,588

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Charlotte, NC

29,046

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Charlotte, NC

51,306

   

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 0 years experience

26,256

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 7 years experience

41,268

   

Average salary for instructor at Appalachian State University

34,300

Average salary for assistant professor at Appalachian State University

41,500

Average salary for full professor at Appalachian State University

60,700

   

Average salary for instructor at UNC-Chapel Hill

45,600

Average salary for asst. professor at UNC-Chapel Hill

51,200

Average salary for full professor at UNC-Chapel Hill

88,700

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

Texas

Position

Salary

Average beginning salary for teacher in Texas

$24,079

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Austin, TX

26,660

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Austin, TX

42,100

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Irving, TX

29,725

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Irving, TX

49,500

   

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 0 years experience

26,256

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 7 years experience

41,268

   

Average salary for instructor at Stephen F. Austin State University

33,300

Average salary for assistant professor at Stephen F. Austin State University

37,500

Average salary for full professor at Stephen F. Austin State University

55,300

   

Average salary for instructor at University of Texas

40,200

Average salary for asst. professor at University of Texas

50,600

Average salary for full professor at University of Texas

84,400

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

California

Position

Salary

Average beginning salary for teacher in California

$26,684

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Berkeley, CA

36,083

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Berkeley, CA

51,072

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in San Diego, CA

34,956

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in San Diego, CA

54,256

   

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 0 years experience

26,256

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 7 years experience

41,268

   

Average salary for instructor at San Diego State University

35,200

Average salary for assistant professor at San Diego State University

45,000

Average salary for full professor at San Diego State University

68,300

   

Average salary for asst. professor at UC, Santa Cruz

49,200

Average salary for full professor at UC, Santa Cruz

87,200

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

Washington

Position

Salary

Average beginning salary for teacher in Washington

$23,933

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Seattle, WA

29,625

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Seattle, WA

49,073

   

Beginning salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Spokane, WA

32,289

Maximum salary for teacher with Ph.D. in Spokane, WA

49,518

   

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 0 years experience

26,256

Stipend for postdoctoral fellow with 7 years experience

41,268

   

Average salary for instructor at Eastern Washington University

30,700

Average salary for assistant professor at Eastern Washington University

36,400

Average salary for full professor at Eastern Washington University

55,200

   

Average salary for instructor at University of Washington

40,800

Average salary for asst. professor at University of Washington

48,100

Average salary for full professor at University of Texas

75,600

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

Protocol – Interviews with Ph.D.s Teaching in Secondary School

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching

INTERVIEW GUIDE:

PH.D.S TEACHING IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

[Read to Interviewee:]

Hello, I'm [Name of Interviewer], a consultant with the National Research Council. I am working on a study that is investigating ways of attracting science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching or curriculum development positions. I hope that you received the letter from the National Research Council last week introducing me to you.

As part of the study, the National Research Council is interviewing a number of science and mathematics doctorates who are currently teaching in secondary schools. We are interested in learning about the process that led you to secondary school teaching and your experiences as a teacher. I expect that this interview will last between 30 and 40 minutes.

[Questions:]

  1. First, would you tell me something about your educational background?

Probes [Ph.D. institution, field, and year of graduation]

[Experience as a postdoc]

[Employment prior to current position]

  1. What attracted you into secondary school teaching?

Probes [Had always wanted to teach

[Enjoy working with children]

[Fruitful way of applying science knowledge]

[Alternative to succession of postdocs]

[Alternative to frustrations of the research track]

[Was unable to get a job at a college or university]

[Took the job for financial and/or family considerations]

  1. Were your colleagues or mentors supportive when you made your decision to enter into secondary school teaching? Did you meet with approval or disapproval?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
  1. Did you encounter any barriers to taking a secondary school teaching position? How did you overcome these barriers?

Probes [None]

[Difficulty finding job openings]

[Getting certified to teach]

[Needed teacher training]

[Adjustment to new working environment]

  1. To what extent did financial considerations have an effect on your decision to enter into secondary school teaching?

Probes [Not at all]

[I got higher pay teaching than as a postdoc]

[Wanted benefit package]

[Wanted stable income]

[Concerned about paying off student debts]

  1. To what extent did family considerations have an effect on your decision to enter into secondary school teaching?

Probes [None. I was not married or didn't have other family considerations at the time]

[I wanted to settle down and raise a family and wanted more career stability]

[I had a definite location preference and secondary teaching gave me the opportunity to live there]

  1. How did you obtain teacher certification? Was this the typical way teachers are certified in your state or was this an alternative certification process? What alternative certification processes are available in your state?

  2. Did your State (and/or the State Department of Education) provide you any assistance or pose any obstacles in getting you certified? If yes, how.

  3. Would you please describe the school in which you are currently teaching?

Probes [Public or private school]

[Science and technology magnet program or school]

[Urban, suburban, or rural]

[Large or small]

[Skill level of students]

[What kinds of facilities are provided?]

  1. What are your relationships with other faculty and with the administration like? Are there other Ph.D.s teaching at the school?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
  1. Are you still engaged in research? If yes, describe your research activities. If no, why are you not doing any research?

    Probes [Summer programs or sabbaticals]

    [Linkages with research universities]

    [Maintains own lab]

    [Networking with colleagues]

    [Attends professional meetings]

  2. Have you ever had any regrets about entering secondary school teaching? If yes, what were they? If no, do you think that you are a special case?

  3. Probes [Felt loss of status]

    [Don't enjoy working in a bureaucracy]

    [Lost connection to research community]

    [Teaching isn't what I expected]

    [Salary and benefits aren't sufficient]

  4. What advice would you give to a science/math Ph.D. who is considering secondary school teaching?

  5. What do you think about the future of secondary school science teaching? What future do you envision for science and mathematics doctorates entering into secondary school teaching?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

Protocol – Interviews with Administrators

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching

Interview Guide:

High School Principals

Hello, this is [name of interviewer] with the National Research Council. I am working on a NRC project investigating the potential for attracting recent science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching or curriculum development positions. I hope you received the letter we sent you last week introducing you to this project.

As one step in this study, we are conducting a national survey of graduate students and recent Ph.D.s to assess their level of interest in such positions, the obstacles they face in taking them, and the incentives they would need to make the transition to these positions. As another step, we would like to obtain the views of high school principals, district superintendents and state education commissioners on the prospects for placing Ph.D.s in these positions.

  1. Do you see recent Ph.D.s as a source of quality science and mathematics teachers in your high school or other high schools in your school district?

  2. Why or why not?

  3. What do you see as the advantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Knowledge of subject at the forefront of the field]

[Commitment to subject]

[Ability to convey scientific methods to students]

[They would make fine teachers]

[Would provide an alternative career for them—would anyone say this?]

  1. What do you see as the disadvantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Lack of teaching ability]

[Lack of commitment to secondary education]

[They're trained for and mainly interested in research]

[Unable to thrive in K-12 environment]

[Unable to relate to other faculty]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
  1. What are the obstacles to attracting and retaining science and mathematics Ph.D.s as secondary school teachers?

Probes [Lack of teacher certification]

[Need for further training in education]

[Lack of interest or commitment on the part of Ph.D.s in teaching]

[Would not be made welcome by other teachers]

[Salary/compensation levels are not sufficient to attract them]

[School districts not willing to hire more expensive Ph.D.s]

  1. Given that funding were available, what incentives or special arrangements have been or could be implemented that would attract science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Alternative certification process: what would it look like?]

[Enhanced compensation: salary, merit pay, summer fellowship, student loan repayment, relocation reimbursement, benefits, other]

[Placement in magnet schools or schools for gifted students]

[Ability to contribute to curriculum development]

[Ability to conduct research]

[Ability to job share]

[Availability of lab quality lab equipment or science kits]

[Special summer programs]

[Other]

  1. Are any of these already available due to policies implemented by the state, the school district you are in, or your school?

  2. Which of these could additionally be implemented at the high school level?

  3. What arrangements have been or could be implemented by graduate schools that would facilitate the transition of science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Availability of teacher preparation courses to Ph.D. candidates]

[Partnerships between universities and school systems that provided exposure of grad students to the K-12 environment]

[Availability of fellowships that gave students an opportunity to work in middle or high schools while in graduate school]

  1. Are any of these currently available? Which might be implemented by colleges or universities in your state?

  2. How willing are you to allow a reduced teaching load for Ph.D.s during a training period??

  3. Are their funds available for teacher training for Ph.D.s?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching

Interview Guide:

School Superintendents

Hello, this is [name of interviewer] with the National Research Council. I am working on a NRC project investigating the potential for attracting recent science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching or curriculum development positions. I hope you received the letter we sent you last week introducing you to this project.

As one step in this study, we are conducting a national survey of graduate students and recent Ph.D.s to assess their level of interest in such positions, the obstacles they face in taking them, and the incentives they would need to make the transition to these positions. As another step, we would like to obtain the views of high school principals, district superintendents and state education commissioners on the prospects for placing Ph.D.s in these positions.

  1. Do you see recent Ph.D.s as a source of quality science and mathematics teachers for the high schools or middle schools in your school district?

  2. Why or why not?

  3. What do you see as the advantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Knowledge of subject at the forefront of the field]

[Commitment to subject]

[Ability to convey scientific methods to students]

[They would make fine teachers]

[Would provide an alternative career for them—would anyone say this?]

  1. What do you see as the disadvantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Lack of teaching ability]

[Lack of commitment to secondary education]

[They're trained for and mainly interested in research]

[Unable to thrive in K-12 environment]

[Unable to relate to other faculty]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
  1. What are the obstacles to attracting and retaining science and mathematics Ph.D.s as secondary school teachers?

Probes [Lack of teacher certification]

[Need for further training in education]

[Lack of interest or commitment on the part of Ph.D.s in teaching]

[Would not be made welcome by other teachers]

[Salary/compensation levels are not sufficient to attract them]

[School districts not willing to hire more expensive Ph.D.s]

  1. Given that funding were available, what incentives or special arrangements have been or could be implemented that would attract science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Alternative certification process: what would it look like?]

[Enhanced compensation: salary, merit pay, summer fellowship, student loan repayment, relocation reimbursement, benefits, other]

[Placement in magnet schools or schools for gifted students]

[Ability to contribute to curriculum development]

[Ability to conduct research]

[Ability to job share]

[Availability of lab quality lab equipment or science kits]

[Special summer programs]

[Other]

  1. Are any of these currently available through school district policies? Which of these could be implemented at the school district level?

  2. What arrangements have been or could be implemented by graduate schools that would facilitate the transition of science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Availability of teacher preparation courses to Ph.D. candidates]

[Partnerships between universities and school systems that provided exposure of grad students to the K-12 environment]

[Availability of fellowships that gave students an opportunity to work in middle or high schools while in graduate school]

  1. Are any of these currently available? Which might be implemented by colleges or universities in your state?

  2. How willing do you think schools would be to allow a reduced teaching load for Ph.D.s during a training period?

  3. Are their funds available at the school district level for teacher training for Ph.D.s?

  4. Are there other positions in which you would like to see Ph.D.s contribute?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching

Interview Guide:

Chief State School Officers or State Policymakers

Hello, this is [name of interviewer] with the National Research Council. I am working on a NRC project investigating the potential for attracting recent science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching or curriculum development positions. I hope you received the letter we sent you last week introducing you to this project.

As one step in this study, we are conducting a national survey of graduate students and recent Ph.D.s to assess their level of interest in such positions, the obstacles they face in taking them, and the incentives they would need to make the transition to these positions. As another step, we would like to obtain the views of high school principals, district superintendents and state education commissioners on the prospects for placing Ph.D.s in these positions.

  1. Do you see recent Ph.D.s as a source of quality science and mathematics teachers in high schools in your state?

  2. Why or why not?

  3. What do you see as the advantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Knowledge of subject at the forefront of the field]

[Commitment to subject]

[Ability to convey scientific methods to students]

[They would make fine teachers]

[Would provide an alternative career for them—would anyone say this?]

  1. What do you see as the disadvantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Lack of teaching ability]

[Lack of commitment to secondary education]

[They're trained for and mainly interested in research]

[Unable to thrive in K-12 environment]

[Unable to relate to other faculty]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
  1. What are the obstacles to attracting and retaining science and mathematics Ph.D.s as secondary school teachers?

Probes [Lack of teacher certification]

[Need for further training in education]

[Lack of interest or commitment on the part of Ph.D.s in teaching]

[Would not be made welcome by other teachers]

[Salary/compensation levels are not sufficient to attract them]

[School districts not willing to hire more expensive Ph.D.s]

  1. Given that funding were available, what incentives or special arrangements have been or could be implemented that would attract science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Alternative certification process: What would it look like? Is something different needed?]

[Enhanced compensation: salary, merit pay, summer fellowship, student loan repayment, relocation reimbursement, benefits, other]

[Placement in magnet schools or schools for gifted students]

[Ability to contribute to curriculum development]

[Ability to conduct research]

[Ability to job share]

[Availability of lab quality lab equipment or science kits]

[Special summer programs]

[Other]

  1. Are any of these currently available through state-level policies? Which of these could additionally be implemented at the state level?

  2. What arrangements have been or could be implemented by graduate schools that would facilitate the transition of science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Availability of teacher preparation courses to Ph.D. candidates]

[Partnerships between universities and school systems that provided exposure of grad students to the K-12 environment]

[Availability of fellowships that gave students an opportunity to work in middle or high schools while in graduate school]

  1. Are any of these currently available? Which might be implemented by colleges or universities in your state?

  2. Are their funds available at the state level for teacher training for Ph.D.s?

  3. Are there other positions in which you would like to see Ph.D.s contribute?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education

Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Teaching

Interview Guide:

Graduate Deans

Hello, this is [name of interviewer] with the National Research Council. I am working on a NRC project investigating the potential for attracting recent science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching or curriculum development positions. I hope you received the letter we sent you last week introducing you to this project.

As one step in this study, we are conducting a national survey of graduate students and recent Ph.D.s to assess their level of interest in such positions, the obstacles they face in taking them, and the incentives they would need to make the transition to these positions. As another step, we would like to obtain the views of graduate deans regarding the prospects for training Ph.D.s for these positions.

  1. Do you see recent Ph.D.s as a source of quality science and mathematics teachers in high schools [in your state]?

  2. Why or why not?

  3. What do you see as the advantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Knowledge of subject at the forefront of the field]

[Commitment to subject]

[Ability to convey scientific methods to students]

[They would make fine teachers]

[Would provide an alternative career for them—would anyone say this?]

  1. What do you see as the disadvantages of Ph.D.s as secondary school science and mathematics teachers?

Probes [Lack of teaching ability]

[Lack of commitment to secondary education]

[They're trained for and mainly interested in research]

[Waste of research talent]

[Unable to thrive in K-12 environment]

[Unable to relate to other secondary school faculty]

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
  1. What are the obstacles to attracting and retaining science and mathematics Ph.D.s as secondary school teachers?

Probes [Lack of teacher certification]

[Need for further training in education]

[Lack of interest or commitment on the part of Ph.D.s in teaching]

[Would not be made welcome by other teachers]

[Salary/compensation levels are not sufficient to attract them]

[School districts not willing to hire more expensive Ph.D.s]

  1. What arrangements have been or could be implemented by graduate schools that would facilitate the transition of science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Availability of teacher preparation courses to Ph.D. candidates]

[Partnerships between universities and school systems that provided exposure of grad students to the K-12 environment]

[Availability of fellowships that gave students an opportunity to work in middle or high schools while in graduate school]

  1. Are any of these currently available? Which would you be willing to implement?

  2. What incentives or special arrangements have been or could be implemented by school systems to attract science and mathematics Ph.D.s to secondary school teaching?

Probes [Alternative certification process: what would it look like?]

[Enhanced compensation: salary, merit pay, summer fellowship, student loan repayment, relocation reimbursement, benefits, other]

[Placement in magnet schools or schools for gifted students]

[Ability to contribute to curriculum development]

[Ability to conduct research]

[Ability to job share]

[Availability of lab quality lab equipment or science kits]

[Special summer programs]

[Other]

  1. Are any of these currently available? Which of these could additionally be implemented by states, school districts, or schools?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Survey of Graduate Students and Recent Ph.D.s: Instruments and Protocols." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
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Next: Appendix D: Interviews with Ph.D.s in K-12 Science and Mathematics Education »
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