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Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education (2000)

Chapter: Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
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Appendix F

Biographies of Committee Members

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
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COMMITTEE ON ATTRACTING SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS PH.D.S TO SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

N. Ronald Morris is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Morris is a cell biologist whose lab studies nuclear migration and its regulation, working on the fungus Aspergillus as a model organism. He has previously served as Associate Dean for Research at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He received a M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine in 1959.

Daniel S. Hamermesh is the Edward Everett Hale Professor of Economics at the University of Texas, Austin and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously he has held faculty positions at Princeton and Michigan State Universities, and has held visiting professorships at numerous universities in the Untied States, Europe, Australia, and Asia. He authored Labor Demand, The Economics of Work and Play, and a wide variety of articles in labor economics and the leading general and specialized economics journals. Dr. Hamermesh's research concentrates on labor demand, social insurance programs (particularly unemployment insurance) and unusual applications of labor economics (e.g., suicide, sleep and beauty). He currently serves on OSEP's Committee on Methods of Forecasting Demand and Supply of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers. He received a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1969.

Kristina Peterson teaches chemistry and biology at the Lakeside School in Seattle, Washington. She received her Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Washington in 1997 and served as a distance learning instructor and course designer and as a science advisor to the Teacher Certification Program Wetlands Project at the University of Washington before joining the Lakeside faculty. She has been an active member of the Seattle Chapter of the Association for Women in Science, serving as chair of its program committee, 1995-96 and 1998-1999 and of its scholarship committee, 1994-1995.

Kimberly Tanner is a NSF postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco in Science Education (PFSMETE). She is working with the UCSF Science and Health Education Partnership to: 1) determine the factors which contribute to the success of teacher-partnerships; 2) evaluate the impact of these partnerships on participating students, teachers, and scientists; and 3) utilize the results of this research to create materials to facilitate teacher-partnerships that can be disseminated for use by universities and school districts nationwide. Dr. Tanner received her Ph.D. in neurosciences from the University of California, San Francisco in 1997 and received a B.A. in biochemistry/biology from Rice University in 1991.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
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Mary Long is currently coordinator of UTeach, the secondary science and mathematics teacher preparation program at the University of Texas, Austin. She previously served on the Austin ISD Science Curriculum Team and as the Manager of the District's Science and Health Resource Center, Austin ISD. For a number of years she held positions at the LBJ High School in Austin, beginning as science teacher and advancing to Director of the Science Academy of Austin at LBJ High School. Ms. Long received a M.Ed. degree in science education from the University of Texas, Austin.

Wendy Kopp is the founder and president of Teach For America, the national corps of outstanding and diverse recent college graduates who commit to teaching in public schools. Since its founding in 1989, Teach For America has fielded 5,000 corps members into underserved areas from South Central Los Angeles to the Mississippi Delta. Ms. Kopp holds a bachelor's degree from Princeton University where she participated in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs. She has received honorary degrees from Connecticut College and Drew University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Page 159
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Page 160
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Attracting Science and Mathematics Ph.D.s to Secondary School Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9955.
×
Page 161
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