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Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site (2000)

Chapter:Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
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Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

MILTON LEVENSON (Chair) is a chemical engineer with over 55 years of experience in nuclear energy and related fields. His technical experience includes work in nuclear safety, fuel cycle, water reactor technology, advanced reactor technology, remote control technology, and sodium reactor technology. His professional experience includes positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in research and operations, Associate Director for Energy and Environment at Argonne National Laboratory, first Director of Nuclear Power at the Electric Power Research Institute, and Vice President of Bechtel International. Mr. Levenson is the past president of the American Nuclear Society; a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; and the recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers ' Robert E. Wilson Award. He is the author of over 150 publications and presentations and holds three U.S. patents. He received his B.Ch.E. from the University of Minnesota and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976.

GREGORY R. CHOPPIN (Vice-Chair) is the R.O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. Dr. Choppin conducts research in nuclear chemistry, physical chemistry of the actinides and lanthanides, environmental behavior of actinides, chemistry of the f-Elements, separation science of the f-Elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. During a postdoctoral period at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. His research activities have been recognized by the American Chemical Society's Award in Nuclear Chemistry and Southern Chemist Award, The Manufacturing Chemists award in Chemical Education, and a Presidential Citation Award of the American Nuclear Society. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees and recently completed a six-year term as a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. He is a member of the committee on the Electrometallurgical Treatment of EBRII Spent Fuel, the Committee on Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes, and the Board on Radioactive

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×

Waste Management. He received his B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, New Orleans, his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Texas, Austin, and has honorary degrees from Chalmers University, Goteborg, Sweden, and from Loyola University, New Orleans.

JOHN BERCAW is the Centennial Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Bercaw is an expert in organometallic chemistry. His research interests include synthetic, structural, and mechanistic organotransition metal chemistry, compounds of early transition metals, and hydroxylation of alkanes by simple platinum halides in aqueous solutions. Dr. Bercaw is a former chair and Executive Committee member of the American Chemical Society's Inorganic Chemistry division. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His work has been recognized with the American Chemical Society' s Award in Pure Chemistry, the Award in Organometallic Chemistry, the Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, and the George A. Olah Award in Hydrocarbon or Petroleum Chemistry. Dr. Bercaw earned his B.S. in Chemistry from North Carolina State University and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Michigan. Dr. Bercaw was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1990.

DARYLE H. BUSCH is the Roy A. Roberts Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of Kansas. Previously, he was a faculty member at The Ohio State University where he rose through the ranks from assistant professor (1954) to Presidential Professor (1987). His research in basic transition metal coordination chemistry fathered modern macrocyclic ligand chemistry and created the molecular template effect. He was among the founders of the subject of ligand reactions and an early researcher and proponent of bioinorganic chemistry. He first described the phenomenon called preorganization in 1970. His research is presently focused on homogeneous catalysis, bioinorganic chemistry, and orderly molecular entanglements. Throughout his research career, Dr. Busch has worked closely with industry and holds patents with five major industrial companies. Some of the recognitions of Dr. Busch's work include the American Chemical Society Award for Distinguished Service in Inorganic Chemistry and for Research in Inorganic Chemistry, the John C. Bailar Medal from the University of Illinois, the Dwyer Medal of The Royal Society of New South Wales, Australia, and the Izatt-Christenson International Award for Macrocyclic Chemistry. Dr. Busch has written three textbooks, and numerous book chapters, articles, and reviews. His teaching has been recognized by the University of Kansas' Louis Byrd Graduate Educator Award. He is the President of the American Chemical Society. Dr. Busch received his B.A. from Southern Illinois University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×

TERESA FRYBERGER is the Associate Laboratory Director for Applied Science and Technology at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). As head of one of four science directorates at BNL, she manages and develops a diverse program in environmental sciences, energy sciences and national security, as well as applied chemistry and materials science. Prior to taking the Brookhaven position, Dr. Fryberger was a senior manager at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). As Senior Deputy Director of PNNL's William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, she was responsible for managing environmental science programs and providing strategic direction for the overall management of this National Scientific User Facility. Dr. Fryberger has managed national scientific programs at the Department of Energy (DOE), has been an associate editor at Science, and was a research chemist and National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Institute for Science and Technology. She is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Fryberger has organized and chaired over fifty national and international meetings of professional societies, DOE, and technical organizations, and has served on numerous advisory and review committees for national laboratories, DOE, and various universities. She earned her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Northwestern University and her B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Oklahoma.

GEORGE KELLER retired in 1997 from Union Carbide Corporation as a Senior Corporate Research Fellow at the Technical Center in South Charleston, West Virginia. He is presently an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at both West Virginia and Marshall Universities and is also involved with various economic-development activities involving new technologies. His prime area of expertise is separation science and technology, with a focus on adsorption, chemical complexation, absorption, distillation, and membranes. He has also been heavily involved with oxidation catalysis, thermal cracking, and energy-use minimization. He earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Keller was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1988.

MATTHEW KOZAK is a Staff Consultant at Monitor Scientific, LLC. Dr. Kozak is an expert in safety assessment and regulatory assessment for waste disposal. He is the U.S. delegate to the International Atomic Energy Agency 's Coordinated Research Program on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies and the Chair of the National Council on Radiation Protection Measurements Scientific Committee 87-3 on Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities. Dr. Kozak regularly advises the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on safety issues. He is a member of the Health Physics Society, the American Nuclear Society, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineering. His professional honors include the Washington State

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×

Mining and Minerals Institute fellowship and the National Academy of Sciences' Radioactive Waste Management grant in 1997. Dr. Kozak earned a B.Ch.E. from Cleveland State University and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle.

ALFRED P. SATTELBERGER has been a member of the technical staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1984. He is currently Director of the Chemistry Division, which employs approximately 375 people and supports a variety of programs in analytical, inorganic, physical, nuclear and radiochemistry, medical radioisotopes, and nuclear physics. Dr. Sattelberger is an inorganic/organometallic chemist with research interests in actinide science, technetium chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and metal-metal multiple bonding. Prior to moving to Los Alamos, Dr. Sattelberger held a faculty position in the chemistry department at the University of Michigan. He is a past member of the Executive Committee of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society and currently serves on the Board of Directors for both the Inorganic Synthesis Corporation and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation. He served as a reviewer on the General Inorganic Chemistry of the DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) merit review panel from 1996–1998 and on the National Research Council's Committee on Building an Effective EM Science Program. Dr. Sattelberger earned his B.A. in Chemistry from Rutgers College and his Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from Indiana University.

BARRY E. SCHEETZ is Professor of Materials, Civil and Nuclear Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Scheetz is active in research areas dealing with the chemistry of cementitious systems. His activities include environmental waste management programs such as remediation of minelands by the use of industrial by-products, focusing on large-volume usages of fly-ash-based cementitious grouts. Other programs include developments of radioactive waste forms based on vitrifiable hydroceramics and sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) structures. Professor Scheetz has serves as a participant in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory review of the Valley of the Drums and as a technical expert for the National Research Council's review of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory processing alternatives for calcined high-level nuclear waste. He has also served as an expert for the State Attorney General of New Mexico. Among his many accomplishments, he received a national internship from the Argonne National Laboratory in 1972, and he was a National Academy of Sciences Visiting Scholar to China in 1989. Professor Scheetz is the author of over 160 scientific publications and holds 46 United States and foreign patents. He received a B.S. in chemical education from Bloomsburg State College, a M.S. in geochemistry, and a Ph.D. in geochemistry and mineralogy from Pennsylvania State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×

MARTIN J. STEINDLER worked at Argonne National Laboratory until his retirement in 1993. His last position at Argonne was as Director of the Chemical Technology Division. Dr. Steindler's expertise is in the fields of the nuclear fuel cycle and associated chemistry, engineering, and safety, with emphasis on fission products and actinides. In addition, he has experience in the structure and management of research and development (R& D) organizations and activities. He has published more than 130 papers, patents, and reports on topics in these areas. During his career, Dr. Steindler has been a consultant to the Atomic Energy Commission, the Energy Research and Development Agency, and various Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. He chaired both the Materials Review Board for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste. Dr. Steindler has served on several National Research Council committees, and currently serves on the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, the Committee on Environmental Management Technologies ' Mixed Waste Committee, and the Committee on Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks in the DOE Weapons Complex. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from the University of Chicago and a number of awards related to his work.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×
Page97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×
Page98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×
Page99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×
Page100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×
Page101
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The Second World War introduced the world to nuclear weapons and their consequences. Behind the scene of these nuclear weapons and an aspect of their consequences is radioactive waste. Radioactive waste has varying degrees of harmfulness and poses a problem when it comes to storage and disposal. Radioactive waste is usually kept below ground in varying containers, which depend on how radioactive the waste it. High-level radioactive waste (HLW) can be stored in underground carbon-steel tanks. However, radioactive waste must also be further immobilized to ensure our safety.

There are several sites in the United States where high-level radioactive waste (HLW) are stored; including the Savannah River Site (SRS), established in 1950 to produce plutonium and tritium isotopes for defense purposes. In order to further immobilize the radioactive waste at this site an in-tank precipitation (ITP) process is utilized. Through this method, the sludge portion of the tank wastes is being removed and immobilized in borosilicate glass for eventual disposal in a geological repository. As a result, a highly alkaline salt, present in both liquid and solid forms, is produced. The salt contains cesium, strontium, actinides such as plutonium and neptunium, and other radionuclides. But is this the best method?

The National Research Council (NRC) has empanelled a committee, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to provide an independent technical review of alternatives to the discontinued in-tank precipitation (ITP) process for treating the HLW stored in tanks at the SRS. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah RIver Site summarizes the finding of the committee which sought to answer 4 questions including: "Was an appropriately comprehensive set of cesium partitioning alternatives identified and are there other alternatives that should be explored?" and "Are there significant barriers to the implementation of any of the preferred alternatives, taking into account their state of development and their ability to be integrated into the existing SRS HLW system?"

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