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Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site (2000)

Chapter:Appendix C: Information Gathering Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
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Appendix C

Information-Gathering Meetings

PRESENTATIONS GIVEN DURING FIRST COMMITTEE MEETING

September 13–14, 1999, Augusta, GA

Background (Steve Piccolo and Roy Schepens)

Large Tank ITP(Joe Carter, WSRC; Walt Tamosaitis, SRTC; Mark Barnes, SRTC; Roy Jacobs, WSRC-HLW; Mike Montini, WSMS)

Small Tank TPB presentation (Sam Fink, SRTC; Reid Peterson, SRTC; Mark Barnes, SRTC; Hank Elder, WSRC-HLW; Jack Collins, ORNL; David Hobbs, SRTC)

CST Non-Elutable ion exchange presentation (Doug Walker, SRTC; Roy Jacobs, WSRC-HLW; John Harbour, SRTC; Dan Lambert, SRTC; Bill Wilmarth, SRTC)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction presentation (Ken Rueter, WSRC-HLW; Ralph Leonard, ANL; Bruce Moyer, ORNL; Reid Peterson, SRTC; John Fowler, WSRC-HLW)

Direct Disposal in Grout presentation (Ed Stevens, SRTC; Christine Langton, SRTC; Jim Cook, SRTC; Elmer Wilhite, SRTC)

PRESENTATIONS GIVEN DURING SECOND COMMITTEE MEETING

November 21–22, 1999, Augusta, GA

Discussion of the Committee's Interim Report (Frank McCoy, DOE; Susan Wood, DOE; Karen Patterson, Citizens Advisory Board)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
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Screening Process and Alternatives Selection, Including Discussion of Reasons for Exclusion of Processes Used at Hanford and West Valley (Steve Piccolo, Chair, Screening Committee)

TPB Precipitation—Scientific, Technical, and Regulatory Issues; R&D Plans (Sam Fink and Mark Barnes, SRTC)

Ion Exchange (CST, other)—Scientific, Technical, and Regulatory Issues; R&D Plans (Bill Wilmarth, SRTC; Dan McCabe, SRTC; John Sherman, UOP)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction—Scientific, Technical, and Regulatory Issues; R&D Plans (Peter Bonneson, ORNL)

“Front-End” Actinide and Strontium Removal (MST) Scientific, Technical, and Regulatory Issues; R&D Plans (David Hobbs and Sam Fink, SRTC)

Direct Grout Option—Scientific, Technical, Regulatory, and Non-Proliferation Issues; R&D Plans (John Reynolds, DOE-SR)

General Overview of Research and Development Planning (Lab and University Partnering, Integration) (Lou Papouchado and Susan Wood, SRTC)

DOE Decision Process and Path Forward and Means of Implementation (Frank McCoy)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
×
Page130
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Information Gathering Meetings." National Research Council. 2000. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9959.
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The Second World War introduced the world to nuclear weapons and their consequences. Behind the scene of these nuclear weapons and an aspect of their consequences is radioactive waste. Radioactive waste has varying degrees of harmfulness and poses a problem when it comes to storage and disposal. Radioactive waste is usually kept below ground in varying containers, which depend on how radioactive the waste it. High-level radioactive waste (HLW) can be stored in underground carbon-steel tanks. However, radioactive waste must also be further immobilized to ensure our safety.

There are several sites in the United States where high-level radioactive waste (HLW) are stored; including the Savannah River Site (SRS), established in 1950 to produce plutonium and tritium isotopes for defense purposes. In order to further immobilize the radioactive waste at this site an in-tank precipitation (ITP) process is utilized. Through this method, the sludge portion of the tank wastes is being removed and immobilized in borosilicate glass for eventual disposal in a geological repository. As a result, a highly alkaline salt, present in both liquid and solid forms, is produced. The salt contains cesium, strontium, actinides such as plutonium and neptunium, and other radionuclides. But is this the best method?

The National Research Council (NRC) has empanelled a committee, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to provide an independent technical review of alternatives to the discontinued in-tank precipitation (ITP) process for treating the HLW stored in tanks at the SRS. Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah RIver Site summarizes the finding of the committee which sought to answer 4 questions including: "Was an appropriately comprehensive set of cesium partitioning alternatives identified and are there other alternatives that should be explored?" and "Are there significant barriers to the implementation of any of the preferred alternatives, taking into account their state of development and their ability to be integrated into the existing SRS HLW system?"

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