Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:

1 Introduction and Overview
Pages 5-15

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 5...
... population. This report by the Committee on Authentication Technologies and Their Privacy Implications provides a limited exploration of such a system and of the potential legal, policy, and technical challenges that it might present.
From page 6...
... The trade-offs (enhanced security versus risks to pri2Examples include tracking fugitives, executing warrants, tracking noncitizens with expired visas, tracking illegal aliens, and confirming alibis for those innocent of criminal charges. A nationwide identity system could facilitate the work done by the National Crime Information Center, a computerized database at the Federal Bureau of Investigation that permits access by authorized users to documented criminal justice information.
From page 7...
... record systems were intentionally designed not to gather linking data.4 Further, it appears that laws requiring individuals to show proof of legal status or citizenship result in increased discrimination based on national origin and/or appearance.5 The human rights issues Mat could arise, such as increased demands for documentation from Dose who look or sound "foreign" and the deterioration of living and working conditions for aliens, are substantial.6 Clearly, an examination of Me legal and social framework surrounding identity systems, while outside Me scope of this report, would be essential.7 Although discriminatory acts such as those alluded to above might be constrainable by law, Me presentation of identifying documents driver's licenses and credit cards, for example is being demanded today in more 3The Electronic Privacy Information Center has compiled a set of resources and reports on the topic at its Web site, . 4An example that frustrates many genealogists is that U.S.
From page 8...
... The range of possibilities for identity systems is broad and includes alternative approaches such as the following: · A database establishing a unique identity and maintaining information on every U.S. citizen, including, for example, information on known felony convictions and place of residence, available for government and commercial query; · A system similar to the above system that also includes noncitizens who are legally in the United States;9 8Some might argue that the SSN is already a de facto national identifier.
From page 9...
... Several policy questions should be asked when considering any kind of identity system (see also Figure 1.1~: · What would be the purpose of the system? Possibilities include expediting and/or tracking travel, prospectively monitoring citizens' activities in order to discern suspicious behavior, and retrospectively aiding in the identification of perpetrators of crime, among others.l° · What is the scope of the population for whom an ID would be issued and whose activities would presumably be recorded in the system?
From page 10...
... "? Beyond simple queries, would analysis and data mining of the collected information be permitted?
From page 11...
... , including what kinds and what levels of system security would be required. Throughout this report, the term "nationwide identity system" is used in lieu of the more colloquial "national ID" or "national ID card." Many of the proposals are often presented in terms of a national identity card, though technologies exist—possibly including biometrics, which measures and analyzes unique physiological and behavioral characteristics of individuals that might serve some of the same proposed purposes without requiring a physical card.
From page 12...
... 12 ~s~T ~r Easy example' Me 1nformat10n corresponding to an 1dentHy may contain facts Much as eye color' age' address" cues Car example' bused to drive a car) ' medical history' financial activity' and so forth.
From page 13...
... If the goal were to detect suspicious activity by previously unsuspected individuals (in order to prevent illegal activity) , correlation of surveyed actions would be required after identification and surveillance were accomplished.
From page 14...
... Each of these systems could and should be subjected to the kind of analysis and critique described in this resee for more information. The committee received a briefing describing some of the issues facing AAMVA in developing a more secure drivers license infrastructure in a context where use of drivers licenses is expanding beyond their nominal function.
From page 15...
... coverage without creating a federally controlled nationwide identity system. Further, the successes and failures of the various nationwide identity systems in use in other countries should be examined in order to have a fully informed discussion in the United States.


This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.