Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:

8. Comprehensive High School Reform Designs
Pages 187-210

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 187...
... A few reform models that exist today began as long as two decades ago. The movement gained substantial momentum, however, in 1997 when Congress approved $150 million to support implementation of comprehensive school designs in school districts nationwide.
From page 188...
... In this chapter we summarize a group of comprehensive school reform models available to high schools. The central features of the various design models overlap considerably, and one goal is to show the high level of consensus that has evolved regarding the features of effective secondary schools.
From page 189...
... include all four of the features as central and required elements. Notwithstanding these variations, the conclusions regarding some of the qualities of engaging schools discussed in this volume are remarkably well represented in national school reform models.
From page 190...
... 190 Cal Cal _ o Cal Cal Cal · ~ Cal o so o o o ._ so o oo ~ ._ pa ˘ U
From page 191...
... All of the comprehensive reform models address how teaching is done and what is being taught, although they vary considerably in how prescriptive they are. In most cases schools are expected to create schedules and staff assignments that increase instructional time and, in some designs, to reduce student-to-adult ratios, especially in language arts and math.
From page 192...
... sat Cal Cal ._ _ ~ o ~ ° ~ ·_ U. CO ~ CO ·— CO a ~ ~ ~c 3 ~ ~ == 3 ~ ~ ~ C , O y _ C ,- ~ ~ ~ 3 ~ C ~ .
From page 194...
... All designs provide professional development opportunities, and some provide in-class and ongoing coaching. The relative emphasis on project-based learning, new teaching strategies, curriculum development and implementation, team building, and leadership training vary considerably among the reform models.
From page 195...
... Evaluation studies of high school reform models further show students taking more advanced academic courses5 (Boykin, 2000; Legters et al., 2002) and having higher levels of enrollment in postsecondary schools6 (Ancess and Wichterie, 1999; MacMullen, 1996)
From page 196...
... In brief, extant evidence suggests that effective implementation of the school reform models included in this chapter does improve some indicators of student engagement and learning. Whether these models can achieve the ambitious goal of improving high school education on a large scale is yet to be seen.
From page 197...
... All of the reform models make legitimate claims to being research based in the sense that their design features are consistent with research on best practices. However, use of data available from participating districts and schools and the requirements for new data to be collected as part of the reform process vary considerably.
From page 198...
... Reform models also vary significantly in whether they set deadlines for decision making and implementation, and if so, how firmly. Although most want to see all of the key features (see Table 8-1 )
From page 199...
... Finally, high schools absorb disproportionate resources because they require more extensive facilities and more administrative and senior teaching staff. Some reform moclels view districts strictly as resource proviclers that help the school carry out the mocle!
From page 200...
... Some amount of flexibility always will be required in comprehensive school reform models because resources, expertise, the student body, and many other variables need to be considered when implementing a mode! in a particular school.
From page 201...
... SCALING UP HIGH SCHOOL REFORM: PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES In this chapter, we have attempted to examine (but not advocate for) a number of comprehensive reform designs now being implemented in urban
From page 202...
... We found remarkable similarities in the comprehensive school reform models that met our criteria in their commitment to some of the key features identified in the research reviewed for this volume. The evidence reviewed for this report suggests that getting these key features, regardless of the design vehicle, should have positive effects on student engagement and learning.
From page 203...
... Second, we need common indicators of what these reforms will look like when achieved in diverse settings and how good is good enough on these indicators. The indicators would need to include acceptable measures of student performance rather than the simplistic measures most states are now using, and there would need to be some assurance that students achieving these thresholds would have equitable access to quality employment and postsecondary education.
From page 204...
... Indicators should be used to finetune implementation strategies along the way. Finally, resources need to be made available to allow the kinds of comprehensive changes that will result in real improvements in student engagement and learning.
From page 205...
... According to the developers, ATLAS builds on a base of research and examined practice drawn from each of the sponsoring organizations. Specifically, the approach draws on essential questions and student exhibitions from the Coalition of Essential Schools; professional development and curriculum development from the Education Development Center; multiple intelligences, authentic assessment, and Teaching for Understanding from Project Zero; and family involvement, school climate, and management and decision making from the School Development Program.
From page 206...
... CES includes a focus on personalized learning, mastery of a few subjects and skills, graduation by exhibition, and creation of a nurturing community. CES is a grassroots reform movement that emphasizes local control and autonomy in interpreting the Common Principles within the cultural and institutional context of each school.
From page 207...
... These dollars are earmarked for technology, instructional materials, and professional development. Edison takes responsibility for the day-to-day operation of a school; lengthens the school year by 25 days and the school day by 1 to 2 hours; helps reorganize schools into academies, houses, and teams; provides all Edison teachers with laptops and students in grades 3 and up with home computers; provides a strong liberal arts curriculum guided by high standards; aligns instruction with assessment; and requires students to stay with the same teacher for 3 years.
From page 208...
... Schools reorganize into small learning communities, create a family advocate system to involve families in supporting student success, and improve instruction through staff development focused on implementing high-quality, standards-based learning activities in every classroom. FTF emphasizes small learning communities as the hub of relationship building, collective responsibility for student outcomes, resource allocation, and professional development activities.
From page 209...
... MODERN RED SCHOOLHOUSE http://www.mrsh.org Modern Red Schoolhouse, a New American Schools design, was developed in 1992 by the Hudson Institute, a private nonprofit research organization. William T
From page 210...
... The goal of the Paideia Program is to provide a rigorous liberal arts education in grades K through 12 that will allow all graduates to have the skills needed to earn a living, to think and act critically as responsible citizens, and to continue educating themselves as lifelong learners. Instructional goals are based on acquisition of knowledge, development of intellectual skills, and enlarged understanding of ideas and values.


This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.