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Biographical Memoirs Volume 81 (2002) / Chapter Skim
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Harold Lloyd James
Pages 156-173

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From page 157...
... petrology of the metamorphosed en cl structurally complex iron-rich sedimentary rocks known as "iron-formation." Although James focuses! his research primarily in northern Michigan, the funciamental interpretations he macle there have proven applicable worIc~wicle, en cl northern Michigan has served as the archetype of sedimentary iron deposits that constitute the bulk of the worIcl's iron ore resources.
From page 158...
... lames showocl that all these rock types may have been locally, en c! with varying intensities, metamorphosecl ancI/or hycirothermally alterecl to yielcl clifferent textures en cl mineral assemblages, yet for the most part, retaining distinctive features that enable their protoliths to be identified, thereby making possible the conceptual reconstruction of the parent sedimentary basins.
From page 159...
... emigratecl from Wales in 1911. Hal's father was a coal miner in Wales, in British Columbia, and finally in Washington state, en c!
From page 160...
... He hacl spent only five semesters on campus, but met graduation requirements by transfer credits from Bellingham Normal School en cl correspondence courses, plus some helpful boosts from Washington State faculty who recognizes! HaT's exceptional potential en cl went out of their way to help him.
From page 161...
... lames spent the early summer of 1940 with Preston Hotz on chromite studies in southwestern Oregon en cl then a final month completing work with Park on the Olympic manganese showings. In 1940, before James completer!
From page 162...
... been wiclely touter! to contain valuable resources, moreover, metallurgists at Washington State hacl aIreacly clevelopecl a process to extract manganese from refractory manganese silicate minerals typical of the Olympic deposits.
From page 163...
... The well-clocumentecl facts that lames presented, however, burst the Olympic manganese bubble en cl savecl the nation fiscal resources for more productive pursuits. He was subsequently commenclecl by several persons (representing railroacis, utilities, en cl other infrastructure parties)
From page 164...
... The Military Geology Unit had been established by Wilmot Bradley en cl Charles Hunt earlier in the war to perform terrain analysis to air! military operations, such as selecting beaches for landings, sites for forward airfields, and availability of water supplies, and identifying problems and opportunities that various terrains offerer!
From page 165...
... In the spring of 1945 the team began examining southern Kyushu preparatory for the invasion of the Japanese home islancis, noting with consiclerable concern the many shelterer! potential gun positions offered by caves along the proposal beachheads.
From page 166...
... himself the project magnetics expert, an important role because magnetics was an essential tool to extend direct geologic observations into the subsurface, especially pertinent for magnetic iron-formation. This task passed on to Ken Wier in late 1946.
From page 167...
... The essential elements of that design proved exceptionally workable en cl were incorporated 15 years later into the design of the John Wesley Powell headquarters burbling for the USGS in Reston, Virginia. lames served a two-year tour as assistant cheer of the large Mineral Deposits Branch in Washington uncler Charles Anderson.
From page 168...
... until 1971, when following the USGS's traditional practice of recycling scientists into en cl out of administrative assignments, he returnee! to MenTo Park to pick up the trait of those ancient rocks in southwestern Montana.
From page 169...
... really humorous quips, en c! although most of us were accustomed to seeing his uneven gait, a consequence of combining youthful exuberance with a toboggan en c!
From page 170...
... U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 310.
From page 171...
... U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 570.
From page 172...
... 15: 191-98. Bedded Precambrian iron deposits of the Tobacco Root Mountains, southwestern Montana.
From page 173...
... HAROLD LLOYD JAMES 1992 173 Precambrian iron-formations: Nature, origin, and mineralogic evolution from sedimentation to metamorphism. In Developments in Sedimentology, vol.


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