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Biographical Memoirs Volume 81 (2002) / Chapter Skim
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Elizabeth S. Russell
Pages 258-277

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From page 259...
... of mammalian clevelopmental genetics, cliecl on May 2S, 2001, at her home on Mount Desert IslancI, Maine, at the age of SS. In a career spanning five clecacles, spent almost entirely at Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Russell clicl pioneering work on pigmentation, bloocI-forming cells, en cl germ cells.
From page 260...
... by a Sewall Wright paper entitlecl "Physiological en cl Evolutionary Theories of Dominance," she cleciclecl to pursue her training in genetics with Wright at the University of Chicago, where she was supported by a teaching assistantship. Her doctoral dissertation, like many Wright students at the time, was concernec!
From page 261...
... In 1947 Tibby's marriage ended in divorce, with William Russell departing for Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, where he and his second wife, Liane Branch Russell, also went on to become renowned geneticists. Throughout her life Tibby maintained a cordial relationship with the "Oak Ridge Russells." Nineteen forty-seven also was the year of the devastating Bar Harbor fire, a fire that largely destroyed the main laboratory building and wiped out all the mice excepting a few in a fireproof section of
From page 262...
... the Russell-Dickie Builcling in honor of Tibby and her colleague, Margaret Dickie. Tibby also was the first to realize that because the genetic background can greatly influence the expression of pigment genes, especially those associated with white spotting, it was important that any comparison of the effects of these genes, particularly the plelotropic effects of alleles, be macle on the same genetic background.
From page 263...
... been her summer student, clemonstratec! that the sterility clisplayocl by W/W, W0/W~ en cl W/W~ genotypes of both sexes was causecl by a germ cell defect.
From page 264...
... They were able to compare the formation, localization, migration, and multiplication of germ cells in putative anemic mice with those in normals. What they founcl en cl reported in ~957 in the Journal of E'cterimental Zoology was that the germ cells in putative anemic embryos form at ~ dpc, but fail to proliferate normally, have low viability, and are retarded in their migration from their site of origin into the germinal ridges.
From page 265...
... but very lightly pigmented skin, intensely pigmented black hairs were proclucecI. These results clemonstratecl in definitive en cl spectacular fashion that it is the agouti locus genotype of the receiving hair follicle that determines the kind of melanin synthesized by the pigment cell.
From page 266...
... Inasmuch as Tibby's interest in W required she become an expert hematologist, it is hardily surprising that she became interested in other mouse mutations having effects on erythropolesis, especially in association with white spotting. This was particularly the case with the mutation Steel (St, Sly, which also affects germ cell multiplication during the migratory phase.
From page 267...
... In fact, c-Kit is currently recognized as one the few cell surface markers that identify pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Many of Tibby's research activities in the 1960s were concerned with analyzing mouse hemoglobins, en cl most of these are cites!
From page 268...
... the aclult hemoglobin pattern en cl that of an embryonic hemoglobin variant in ~15 inbred mouse stocks of diverse genetic origin. The aclult and embryonic hemoglobins were tightly linker!
From page 269...
... Tibby was elected! to the National Academy of Sciences in 1972 and in 1974 she was appointed to its Council, where not surprisingly, she was an active participant in the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, waging a vigorous battle in support of the preservation of live animal en cl plant germ plasm.
From page 270...
... Tibby also clevelopecl a summer course in mouse genetics that for many years alternates! with the Johns Hopkins/{ackson Laboratory human genetics course.
From page 271...
... Although Tibby rarely expressed her religious views, she was a devout Episcopalian who regularly attended church and sang a rich alto in the choir. In 1982, after participating in a radiation biology workshop in Egypt, she extended her trip to Liberia to represent the Episcopal Diocese of Maine during the Anglicanization of the Liberian Diocese, a sister diocese of Maine.
From page 272...
... We raisecl vegetables and cats, dogs, guinea pigs and, occasionally, hell." He also noted that Tibby "didn'tjust tolerate our teenage shenanigans and soul searching, she lent support wherever our interests carrier!
From page 273...
... her summer cottage on Echo Lake in Somesville with floor-to-ceiling windows overIooking the water. It was here that Tibby cliecl peacefully of pancreatic cancer, a disease that hac!
From page 274...
... 274 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS (chorus) Tibby macle her mincl up at twenty- two, To stucly blooc!
From page 275...
... Genetics 34: 133-45. A quantitative histological study of the pigment found in the coatcolor mutants of the house mouse.
From page 276...
... Implantation of normal bloodforming tissue in radiated genetically anemic hosts. Science 124:1076-77.
From page 277...
... The cellular basis of the genetically determined hemopoietic defect il n anemic mice of genotype Slash. Blood 26:399-410.


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