Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:

7 Conclusions
Pages 140-146

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 140...
... it;: ~ ~: ::~::: :~: ~ ~ ::: Ail: ~ :::::: ~~ :~: :::::~:~:~::~:~::~ ::: :::: ::: ::::: ; q ~:~ ~~;~:~:~ ~~:~r :~ ~~::~-~ ~ ~ ~~ :~:~; ~:~ :~ ~ ~ ~:~' Gem unapt Ace; rat ~~ ns~_awue :~ ~t insunng i [~ ~ .
From page 141...
... Among married, childless couples, an additional 3.7 million family units have one or both members uninsured. More than 38 million uninsured people live in the 11.1 million family units mentioned above, with relatives other than their own children under age 18, with people other than conventionally recognized kin, or alone.
From page 142...
... Although uninsured people tend to have poorer health status than otherwise comparable insured people, they are less likely to visit a physician, fill prescriptions, and obtain preventive care and other services. Chapter 6 of this report presents strong evidence that insured children have better access to and use more health care services than do uninsured children.
From page 143...
... IMPLICATIONS OF PARENTAL COVERAGE The Committee s second report, Care Without Coverage: Too Little, Too Irate, shows that the 30 million adults without coverage, many of whom are parents, are less likely to receive appropriate, timely care, particularly for chronic illnesses and certain life-threatening conditions, such as cancer, than are insured adults. Health policy researchers and health care professionals understand the financial and health risks of having family members without insurance.
From page 144...
... The Committee has shown that families with members uninsured for long periods are more likely to incur substantial health care costs for services and to suffer adverse consequences to health. These risks have added significance because ofthe types offamilies most likely to have some or all members uninsured.
From page 145...
... In this study the evidence demonstrates that uninsured children are less likely than insured children to have a usual source of health care or a regular physician. For children, gaps in coverage are associated with health access and use that resemble those of chronically uninsured children.
From page 146...
... The Committee notes the recent policy discussions regarding subsidizing Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) coverage for workers who lose their jobs under particular circumstances.


This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.