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IX Focused Research and Development Needs
Pages 101-111

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From page 101...
... technologies to are discussed below. assist in tank waste removal, including robotic devices; and (3)
From page 102...
... of low-level waste. The tive in the removal of additional sludge heel in Tank 16 at the Savannah River Site, moderately effective in Tank C-106 low-level waste has an isotopic composition that is different at Hanford, and ineffective for treatment or removal of than the tank waste and includes a significant contribution zeolitic materials (used for radiocesium ion exchange)
From page 103...
... The committee judges December 2005 at the Savannah River Site to evaluate the that the probability of a criticality event in a tank is low: It is use of nitric acid and its application to sludge removal in the unlikely that the tank waste processing system would either Savannah River Site waste tanks. However, the site recog- have a sufficient amount of fissile material in one location or nizes that the current flowsheet does not include nitric acid configure it properly to start a chain reaction.
From page 104...
... .4 As shown in Chapter III, DOE faces the need to retrieve Because the challenges of DOE tank waste cleanup are waste from many large tanks containing cooling coils and unique and the opportunities for deployment have been few other obstructions, especially at the Savannah River Site. The due to the pace of the tank waste cleanup program, developbaseline bulk retrieval approach consists of using water jets ment and deployment of robotic-like devices for this purpose from the riser locations to spray material off the internal tank has been attempted only by a few teams.
From page 105...
... 3, Tooling such as water jets requires a continuous feed. NEAR-TERM AND LONG-TERM STUDIES REGARDING The management of a tether around pipes and through TANK FILL MATERIALS thick sludge is a challenging task.
From page 106...
... The concrete durability research conducted by ticular, at the Savannah River Site. However, the committee Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for its near-surface dis- has not seen any reports of long-term testing or a com prehensive analysis of basic properties to model long-term behavior.
From page 107...
... Examples of examination methods would 19 for such properties as hydraulic conductivity have been include the following: inferred from the literature or from test data on the saltstone test program (see Chapter V)
From page 108...
... . USE OF TEST BEDS FOR THE STUDY OF RETRIEVAL The Savannah River Site has operated a test bed at the TECHNIQUES TNX facility, but it is not clear that this test bed will be As noted in Chapter III, waste retrieval (bulk or residual)
From page 109...
... The purpose of this radioactive liquid tank waste stabilization and disposition at Idaho National meeting is to share technology development and deployment Laboratory, $571 million for tank waste stabilization and disposition at the efforts among DOE sites and vendors to identify equipment Savannah River Site, and $964 million for Hanford's Office of River Protection (which is responsible for the storage, retrieval, treatment, immoand systems applicable to tank closure that have been suc bilization, and disposal of tank waste)
From page 110...
... Idaho National Laboratory, the caustic-side solvent extraction proposed for the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Recommendation IX-2: DOE should fund research and Savannah River Site, and the Light-Duty Utility Arm and development partnerships among universities, national the Houdini in-tank vehicle used for waste retrieval at the laboratories, and industry focused on options for chemical cleaning of tanks to find alternative cleaning agents or to mitigate the criticality and downstream processing problems that Savannah River Site staff pointed out to the committee. 12In 2003, DOE estimated that by implementing its plan for accelerated cleanup, the department could reduce the projected $105 billion cost and Finding IX-3: Untethered semiautonomous robotic devices 70-year time frame for cleanup of tank wastes at the Savannah River Site, Hanford, and Idaho National Laboratory to $76 billion and 35 to 50 years.
From page 111...
... and make them available particularly the binding capacity of grouts and the changes for use by other DOE sites.


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