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Pages 36-42

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From page 36...
... Table of Contents Message from Board of Directors Introduction Purpose Guiding principles Specifications for Transit Equipment and Facilities Vehicle dimensions/weight Vehicle turning radius Bus stop location/spacing Bus stop pavement Bus stop size Bus stop identification Bus stop pads Bus stop amenities Special requirements for terminals/turnarounds Information displays Land Use Requirements Land use types Density Street pattern Lane width Intersection radii Curb height/curb cuts Pedestrian access and pathways Pedestrian amenities Lighting Parking design/management Building orientation Building architecture Landscaping References Appendices Acknowledgments PURPOSE AND USE OF GUIDELINES Respondents to the survey provided a brief summary describing the purpose of their guidelines. A typical response to this question was to "Provide specific design guidance to develCHAPTER SEVEN USE AND APPLICATION OF GUIDELINES TO INCORPORATE BUS TRANSIT SERVICE INTO NEW DEVELOPMENTS
From page 37...
... The stated purposes within the guidelines themselves are, of course, much longer but the message remains the same. For example, the LYNX Central Florida Mobility Design Manual states that: "This manual is a definitive statement of the actions needed to successfully integrate the physical design of independent projects into comprehensive sustainable communities that are served by a balanced transportation system." Another example, from Pace, the Suburban Bus Division in the Chicago area, states that their Development Guidelines were prepared "to encourage the coordination of real estate development and transit service." And furthermore, that the "recommendations in this manual are designed to help municipalities and the development community accommodate transit service in their development plans." DISTRIBUTION OF GUIDELINES It is unclear from the survey responses how often guidelines are actually used by stakeholders outside of the transit agency.
From page 38...
... The typical big box development set within an urban area with good pedestrian access provides a visual contrast of the worst and the best in providing pedestrian pathways. The guidelines provided by survey respondents indicated that transit agencies recognized the need to provide good pedestrian sidewalks.
From page 39...
... The Cleveland RTA guidelines address the pedestrian experience and the impact that the surrounding development has on the quality of the waiting environment. A well-designed bus stop located in a dreary area may be a comfort for waiting customers; however, the surrounding area will overshadow the bus stop "oasis." Cleveland's guidelines note that the quality of the surrounding area is just as important as the quality of the transit waiting environment itself (see Figure 21)
From page 40...
... FIGURE 21 A mix of land uses and landscaping provide an interesting pedestrian environment. (Courtesy: Mary Kay Christopher.)
From page 41...
... Beyond the simplest provisions associated with a single bus stop, a development that will include more complex transit facilities will require the provision of additional specifications. If the development will house a bus terminal, then the developer will need to be aware of bus operator needs for a washroom.
From page 42...
... Additional specifications and technical details provided by transit agencies in their guidelines include: • A concrete pad at bus stops. Asphalt pavement is often inadequate at bus stops with heavy bus traffic.


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