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Pages 257-285

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From page 257...
... Aircraft operations area or air operations area (AOA) : Any area of the airport used or intended to be used for the landing, takeoff or surface maneuvering of aircraft, including runways, taxiways and, in some cases, ramp areas.
From page 258...
... published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government of the United States. Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR)
From page 259...
... The certification requirements vary by class. An airport operator identifies the class of Part 139 certification it is required to carry based on the type of scheduled or unscheduled air carrier operations to be served.
From page 260...
... • The regional office interviews the airport operator to obtain information about the airport and air carrier operations served or anticipated to be served. • If the FAA determines that a certificate is necessary, FAA staff will provide the airport operator with an application for certification (FAA Form 5280-1: Application for Airport Operating Certificate)
From page 261...
... Airport Snow and Ice Control Plan Each certificate holder whose airport is located where snow and icing occur must prepare, maintain and carry out a snow and ice control plan, as prescribed by FAR §139.313. The plan must include elements and instructions on prompt and timely snow and ice removal and the positioning of removed snow so as not to interfere with aircraft operations in the movement area.
From page 262...
... • Airports regularly serving foreign air carrier operations required to be under a security program by 49 CFR Part 1546: Foreign Air Carrier Security. • Airport operators that receive security directives or information circulars issued by the designated official for civil aviation security.
From page 263...
... Commercial Service -- Attracting Airlines and Transitioning to Airline Service 263 security program and accompanying federal, state and local regulations. The airport operator must ensure that one or more ASCs are designated as follows: • To serve as the airport operator's primary and immediate contact for security-related activities and communications with the TSA.
From page 264...
... Airside improvements also may be required as part of the airport certification process, especially if the size of the aircraft using the airport will be changing. These improvements may include the following: • Runway and taxiway pavements and safety areas • Apron areas • Lighting and signs • Navigational aids • Obstruction clearing • Buildings to house required equipment • Snow removal equipment and deicing agents ACRP Report 96: Apron Planning and Design Guidebook and its associated PowerPoint presentation detail the numerous factors that should be considered when planning apron areas to accommodate commercial passenger service.
From page 265...
... Commercial Service -- Attracting Airlines and Transitioning to Airline Service 265 public must be involved in the process to update the master plan. Input from the public should be obtained on the airport's plan to initiate commercial air service.
From page 266...
... The purpose of an airline use agreement is as follows: • To establish the business arrangement and rate-setting methodology • To identify premises and facilities leased by airlines • To define the level of control over the budgeted expenses at the airport • To identify responsibilities and obligations for indemnification, insurance, environmental issues and other governmental inclusion ACRP Report 36: Airport/Airline Agreements -- Practices and Characteristics offers a plethora of information and should be consulted when developing a new airline use agreement or making
From page 267...
... Airport/Airline Negotiations Chapter 3 of ACRP Report 36 discusses the negotiation process between the airport operator and airline, noting seven steps in a typical negotiation process: 1. Review existing agreement, if there is one, and develop airport operator goals and objectives.
From page 268...
... 268 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports 3. Incorporate capital development needs and develop priorities.
From page 269...
... Commercial Service -- Attracting Airlines and Transitioning to Airline Service 269 7.3 Customer Service Key Insights Airport operators are typically responsible for coordinating the overall customer experience for the passenger's entire movement, from ground transportation to aircraft and aircraft to ground transportation. Airport operators today have become very competitive regarding attracting passengers because passengers have more than one choice as to which airport to patronize.
From page 270...
... The report contains a detailed template that uses this road map in Chapter 12 to help airport operators develop a program for the execution of excellent customer service. Source: Adapted from ACRP Report 157: Improving the Airport Customer Experience, 2016 Figure 20.
From page 271...
... Commercial Service -- Attracting Airlines and Transitioning to Airline Service 271 Source: © Butterfly Consulting, used with permission Figure 21. Road map for implementing customer satisfaction improvement program.
From page 272...
... 272 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports 7.4 Air Service Development Key Insights Airport sponsors have little control over many of the factors that drive airline decisions. Air carriers choose a new service based on a comparative analysis of profitability across communities.
From page 273...
... It is an excellent educational resource for air service development. ACRP Report 142: Effects of Airline Industry Changes on Small- and Non-Hub Airports identifies strategies for airports to market, retain and potentially expand air service and includes case studies.
From page 274...
... A nationwide commercial pilot shortage is anticipated to occur in the next several years; this shortage could affect commercial airports across the United States. Pilot retirements and fewer pilots coming from the military have reduced the pool of commercial pilots.
From page 275...
... A few items to consider when developing a SWOT analysis include the following: • Historic or projected socioeconomic growth in region • Major employers that rely on air service, tourism or other visitor travel • Size of catchment area • Existing airport facilities and airline charges • Incentive and marketing program for airlines • Passenger trends The SWOT analysis should use this data to examine: • Strengths: The strengths that you want the airport to maintain, build on and use • Weaknesses: The weaknesses that you want the airport to remedy or eliminate • Opportunities: The opportunities that you want the airport to prioritize and optimize • Threats: The threats that you want the airport to address Typically, strengths and weaknesses are more focused on external perceptions of the airport, while opportunities and threats are more focused on outside influences. Chapter 4 of ACRP Report 28: Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports provides guidance on developing a SWOT analysis.
From page 276...
... grant proposals • Community coalition/partnership establishment and interaction ACRP Report 28 provides additional information on managing air service and community expectations. Using an air service consultant may seem like an expensive proposition; however, air service development consultants have an understanding of what the airlines need and desire, often have airline contacts and have access to data resources that may be too expensive and time consuming for an airport to obtain and analyze.
From page 277...
... New service is defined as service to a destination not currently served, nonstop service where no nonstop service is currently offered, a new entrant air carrier or increased frequency of flights to a specific destination. Incentives may be offered only to new carriers for no more than 1 year.
From page 278...
... airports through the EAS program since 1978. The program was modified and extended by the Airport and Airway Safety and Capacity Expansion Act of 1987 and later made permanent as part of the Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act of 1996.
From page 279...
... Legislation that passed Congress in 2013 imposed new rules on pilots, including mandating co-pilots possess an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate that requires a minimum of 1,500 hours (compared to 250 hours previously needed by co-pilots)
From page 280...
... ACRP Report 30 includes a virtual interactive tour of an airport, allowing the user to focus on different areas of interest. It also includes spreadsheet models to analyze and evaluate how to integrate common use.
From page 281...
... Each of these areas is discussed in detail in Chapter 3 of ACRP Report 30. Source: ACRP Report 30: Reference Guide on Understanding Common Use at Airports, 2010 Wireless for operations Common ramp information display system Managed campus area network for all tenants Passenger self-boarding gates Off-airport check-in Common bag drop Baggage tracking service Figure 24.
From page 282...
... FAA Order 5500.1: Passenger Facility Charge provides guidance and procedures to the FAA and is a useful tool for airports as well. The FAA presentation "PFC 101 -- An Overview" provides additional information on the PFC program.
From page 283...
... 5. PFC approval and collection: After the application is approved, the airport sponsor will notify the air carriers to begin collection.
From page 284...
... Both ACRP reports
From page 285...
... Contingency Planning, 20p12 and ACRP Report 153: Guidebook for IROPS Stakeholder Communication and Coordination, 2016 1. Get executive buy-in and get organized •Include all stakeholders/service providers •Identify IROPS champion •Create IROPS Contingency Response Committee 2.


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