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Pages 60-69

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From page 60...
... FAA has set standards for noise levels and has programs that can be utilized to redress these issues. Also, FAA has issued multiple items of guidance regarding noise mitigation and land uses identified as incompatible with airport activities.
From page 61...
... Examples of railroad mitigation programs include • Grade crossing management, • Quiet zones, • Trespass prevention programs, • Operation Lifesaver, and • Canada Proximity website. A few of these measures are discussed here, but a more complete discussion can be found on the EnvisionFreight website.
From page 62...
... Quiet zones are designed to reduce noise around residential areas, schools, hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other noise-sensitive land uses. Grade crossings within one-half mile of another crossing in a quiet zone are to be included within the quiet zone boundary.
From page 63...
... Programs are conducted for various groups including schools, driver education classes, community audiences, professional drivers, law enforcement groups, and emergency responders. The Operation Lifesaver programs are co-sponsored by federal, state, and local government agencies; highway safety organizations; and railroads.
From page 64...
... . The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey developed a Clean Air Strategy to reduce the port's polluting activity and its impact on the surrounding neighborhoods (Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 2010)
From page 65...
... Throughout the United States, hazardous materials are moved by marine vessels, air, rail, and truck. Hazmat chemicals that give freight transportation providers the most cause for concern are the toxic inhalation hazard (TIH)
From page 66...
... Figure 8-6. Poor residential design layout.
From page 67...
... Port facilities also produce rules that regulate the transport of hazardous materials in their facilities. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, for example, updated its "Redbook" in 2009 regarding the transportation of hazardous materials by truckers in tunnel and bridge facilities that it operates (Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 2009a)
From page 68...
... 2 A lk al i (m at er ia ls , l iqui d, or so li d th at ca n d isso lv e s ki n, ti ssu e, or co rrode ce rt ai n m et al s) 9 M is ce ll an e ous S ubs ta nc es th at do not fa ll in to ot he r c at e gorie s Source: Adapted from U.S.DOT, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.
From page 69...
... Seven steps are outlined for data collection and calculation methods. A series of tables also is provided to calculate whether the proposed development falls within the acceptable distance curves created for multiple types of hazardous materials.


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