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Pages 87-106

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From page 87...
... 5-1 CHAPTER 5 BRT STATIONS AND FACILITIES Bus stops, stations, and terminals, as well as associated facilities such as park-and-ride lots, form the interface between passengers and the BRT system. These facilities should be convenient, comfortable, safe, and accessible to passengers with disabilities.
From page 88...
... 5-2 in mind that such rights-of-way may not serve highdensity areas as well as existing streets. • Community Participation.
From page 89...
... in the suburbs. However, these are by no means hard-and-fast rules.
From page 90...
... 5-4 local neighborhood maps should be placed in consistent locations at each station and use common systemwide design themes. Signage and graphics should readily distinguish BRT stations from regular bus stops.
From page 91...
... Visibility is the single most important attribute of security. Passengers should be able to see their surroundings and be seen from locations within and outside the station.
From page 93...
... 5-3.5. Center Versus Side Platforms Side platforms are most commonly used along busways because they are compatible with conventional bus door configurations (bus doors are typically on the curb side of the vehicle, or the right side in North America)
From page 94...
... tional transit bus. They also limit BRT service to places with high platforms, thereby greatly limiting the flexibility of bus operations.
From page 95...
... 5-9 forms closer together is an advantage in terms of passenger security.
From page 96...
... more elaborate in-line stations if warranted by ridership and available funding. Ideally, access to such stations should be via dedicated bus-only ramps, but in some cases patronage, bus volumes, and traffic conditions may allow BRT vehicles to share ramps with general traffic and to operate for short distances on local streets to reach the stations.
From page 97...
... 9-lane roadway envelope Prohibit left turns along transitway or provide left turn lanes. NOTE: Figure 5-7.
From page 98...
... Guidelines for the Location and Design of Bus Stops (Texas Transportation Institute,1996) provides very thorough guidance on the design of curbside bus stops.
From page 99...
... both BRT and local bus service patterns. Large terminals in urban areas may provide intermodal connections to other modes such as LRT and heavy rail.
From page 100...
... • Buses may unload and load at the same location when space is constrained or bus volumes are light. Highervolume operations may require separate unloading and loading areas.
From page 102...
... and drycleaners are highly desirable at BRT terminals. Figure 5-12 shows a typical on-line terminal station.
From page 103...
... • Size. The number of park-and-ride spaces should be keyed to projected station ridership.
From page 104...
... Maintenance and storage facilities (MSFs) are very large, multiple-building complexes where vehicles are maintained and stored.
From page 105...
... shop as well as shop areas for electrical work, radiators, transmissions, woodworking, upholstery, welding, metalworking, graphics, thermal cleaning, and glass working. This facility would also include a shipping and receiving area, a storage room, a lunchroom, lockers, and toilet facilities.
From page 106...
... located with other municipal facilities) if the BRT system runs in the street with relatively small station facilities.

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