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Pages 14-26

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From page 14...
... 15 to quantify overall bus speed increases because there is no problem if bus speeds increased. "Other" responses included slower local service but increased speed on BRT routes and mixed results by route or by area served.
From page 15...
... 16 TABLE 9 TRENDS IN LOCAL BUS SPEEDS OVER PAST 5 YEARS Trend No. Agencies Responding % Agencies Responding Results are mixed 23 39.0 Bus speeds have decreased 23 39.0 No change in bus speeds 7 11.9 Bus speeds have increased 6 10.2 Total responding agencies 59 100 Source: Survey results.
From page 16...
... 17 rare. Several agencies noted that restructuring occurred episodically, most often in conjunction with major system studies or with implementation of new rail lines.
From page 17...
... 18 to 700 ft or 152 to 213 m; fully developed residential area (10 to 20 persons per acre) , 700 to 850 ft or 213 to 259 m; low-density residential (three to 10 persons per acre)
From page 18...
... 19 vehicle sizes. One agency noted that use of articulated buses has increased running time owing to longer dwell times at stops but that this trend has been partially mitigated by use of low-floor articulated buses.
From page 19...
... 20 signal progression to favor transit on major transit corridors. Three agencies described a formal process through which they can raise a signal timing problem with the municipality that owns the signal.
From page 20...
... 21 ate increase in bus speeds, whereas the other (with numerous traffic-calming measures) reported a decline in bus speeds.
From page 21...
... 22 the second stop is for a passenger with disabilities. Another agency noted that bus operators open all doors routinely on BRT routes.
From page 22...
... 23 by actions taken for other purposes, such as adding running time to improve on-time performance. An interesting "other" measure was variability in running time.
From page 23...
... 24 cies that answered this question indicated that certain actions were considered but never taken. Table 21 lists actions mentioned by at least 15% of responding agencies and notes the primary reasons for not taking each action.
From page 24...
... 25 CONSTRAINTS The discussion of actions contemplated but not implemented is a good lead-in to a broader examination of constraints affecting the ability to take actions to improve bus speeds. Survey respondents described various elements in terms of the extent to which they were constraining factors.
From page 25...
... 26 (although our work with the State and the Counties related to our TSP program is bearing some fruit on those routes -- we are seeing signal optimizations that are improving our speeds in a limited way)
From page 26...
... 27 and 33%, respectively, of respondents. The most common metrics reported were on-time performance and ridership.

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