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Pages 6-24

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From page 6...
... STEP 1 FORM A COLLABORATIVE PLANNING TEAM IT'S NOT THE PLAN, IT'S THE PEOPLE. Collaboration is the foundation of emergency planning, and beginning to develop that collaboration is the first step.
From page 7...
... Page 8 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TASK 1.1 IDENTIFY LIKELY INTERAGENCY AND INTER-REGIONAL PARTNERS (JURISDICTIONS AND LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT) REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COORDINATION Imagine a huge event in your vicinity -- for example, hurricane, terrorist attack, major flood, or chemical spill Your jurisdiction or region may play one or more of the following roles in an event: • A source of evacuees • Support for evacuees passing through the jurisdiction (providing equipment, staff, supplies)
From page 8...
... Page 9 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team   Meet and Greet You may want to convene an initial meeting primarily for transportation, transit, and emergency managers to get to know each other (if they don't already) , prior to the full-blown stakeholder workshop recommended in Step 2.
From page 9...
... Page 10 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team in Resource Tool 1.3, expanded from the FEMA descriptions to elaborate on potential transportation roles and interaction with each ESF. TASK 1.2 ENGAGE THE WHOLE COMMUNITY IN PLANNING Develop an initial list of potential non-government partners–private sector, community-based, and faith-based organizations.
From page 10...
... Page 11 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team FIGURE 1-2: CPG 101, Version 2: Forming a Whole Community Collaborative Partnership 1 Know the Community Hazards Population Capabilities As you progress in producing a community map, there are three major areas where members of various communities can assist your effort. Members of the community know the natural, technological, and man-made hazards that exist in their community.
From page 11...
... Page 12 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TOOL 1.1: NETWORK CONTACT DATABASE PURPOSE: This tool is a template to organize contacts for building a network. DIRECTIONS: Complete the information for each public, voluntary, and private entity.
From page 12...
... Page 13 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TOOL 1.2: POTENTIAL FRAMEWORKS FOR INTEGRATING MODES FOR EFFECTIVE EVACUATION: CONVENER AGENCIES FOR MULTIMODAL EVACUATION (CAME) PLANNING PURPOSE: This tool sets forth three steps for developing frameworks for integrating modes and entities for effective evacuation.
From page 13...
... Page 14 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team STATE AGENCIES State Emergency Management State emergency management agencies are vital for multijurisdictional planning, implementation, response, and reentry efforts. They set policy and usually coordinate with transportation agencies and all other functional areas during planning, response, recovery, and reentry.
From page 14...
... Page 15 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team REGIONAL AGENCIES Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) and Councils of Governments (COGs)
From page 15...
... Page 16 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team LOCAL AGENCIES Emergency Management and Response These agencies are critical for evacuation planning, response, and reentry. They are often the lead agency responsible for all aspects of emergency preparedness, response and management.
From page 16...
... Page 17 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team Step 2: Identifying one or more CAME planning The second step in developing frameworks for integrating modes and entities for effective evacuation is to identify one or more agencies to serve as the Convener Agencies for Multimodal Evacuation (CAME)
From page 17...
... Page 18 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team Step 3: Possible Frameworks for CAME Structure This step defines possible frameworks for a CAME structure based on two alternative framework dimensions. FRAMEWORK DIMENSION 1: LOCAL, REGIONAL, OR STATE LEAD Local governments are most connected to people's needs but might be problematic to serve as the CAME because they do not have experience with issues in areas they do not serve.
From page 18...
... Page 19 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team All other agencies listed in Step 1 of Tool 1.2, and possibly others, should be considered within the framework as members of the CAME Committee - the Emergency Operations Team, Core Planning Team, or whatever name is chosen for the full planning group. Strong consideration should be given as to inclusion of NGOs, community-based organizations (CBOs)
From page 19...
... Page 20 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TOOL 1.3: INTRODUCTION TO ESF AND TRANSPORTATION ROLES AND INTERACTIONS WITH EACH ESF PURPOSE: 1. Introduce transportation and transit personnel that may not be familiar with emergency management concepts to emergency support functions.
From page 20...
... Page 21 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team Local and regional agencies may include ESFs as part of disaster planning, and it may be most expedient to use the same format as the NRF. Some local and regional agencies combine ESFs or use different nomenclature.
From page 21...
... Page 22 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TOOL 1.3, INTRODUCTION TO ESF AND TRANSPORTATION ROLES AND INTERACTIONS WITH EACH ESF ESF Scope Transportation Interactions Focused on Evacuation ESF #3 – Public Works • Infrastructure protection Transportation agencies are sometimes part and Engineering and emergency repair of Public Works and Engineering; coordinate on roadway, bridge status, detours needed • Infrastructure restoration for evacuation, and repairs needed/prioritized • Engineering services and for reentry. For resource typing (see Step 4)
From page 22...
... Page 23 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TOOL 1.3, INTRODUCTION TO ESF AND TRANSPORTATION ROLES AND INTERACTIONS WITH EACH ESF ESF Scope Transportation Interactions Focused on Evacuation ESF #11 – Agriculture • Nutrition assistance Livestock may need to be relocated in an and Natural Resources evacuation-transportation coordination needed. • Animal and plant disease See Step 2, Tool 2.5.
From page 23...
... Page 24 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TOOL 1.4: POTENTIAL COMMUNITY PARTNERS PURPOSE: Tool 1.4 provides examples of local, county, regional, state, and national entities–communitybased, and faith-based organizations, public agencies, and private companies–that may help in planning and responding to an evacuation. The tool is compiled from literature review and interview findings and is not comprehensive.
From page 24...
... Page 25 Step 1 - Form a Collaborative Planning Team TABLE 1-2: Potential Community Partners TOOL 1.4, POTENTIAL COMMUNITY PARTNERS Potential Partners–CommunityBased, Faith-Based Organizations Potential Partners–Private Sector Potential Partners–Public • Agencies that work with indi- • Adult and child day care facilities • Animal services viduals who have disabilities, limited English skills, or who • After school programs • Citizens advisory committees are poor, children, home- • Air service (commer- • Colleges and universities bound, or carless with no cial and private) • Commuter rail/light rail easy access to public transit • Amtrak, railroads • Detention centers (e.g., jail, • Agencies serving people who • Animal shelters juvenile, half-way house, prison, are blind or have low vision • Coach company and other work-release programs)

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