Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:


Pages 26-34

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 26...
... 26 This chapter provides design guidelines for various busway intersections. These guidelines apply the basic principles and policies set forth in the previous chapters.
From page 27...
... 27 corridor median busway in Cleveland will use the platform height to channel pedestrians leaving the station to cross at the intersection. The platform will be raised 14 inches off the ground to deter pedestrians from leaving the station from the platform.
From page 28...
... 28 located between 50 and 400 feet from the parallel roadway. The two intersections usually function together as one intersection.
From page 29...
... Figure 7-2. Example of a side-aligned busway intersection.
From page 30...
... 30 Basic Geometry The basic geometry for this type of intersection is a twolane busway intersecting a two- to four-lane roadway. If there is a stop at the intersection, the busway may have passing lanes at the station.
From page 31...
... Figure 7-3. Example of a signalized, separated right-of-way busway intersection.
From page 32...
... Figure 7-4. Example of a stop-controlled, separated right-of-way busway intersection.
From page 33...
... 33 Roadway geometry and traffic control devices, while similar to other intersections, should accommodate bus turning movements with minimum encroachment on opposing travel lanes. Ramps may be one way or two ways depending upon specific circumstances.
From page 34...
... 34 Source: NCHRP Report 155 (17)

Key Terms



This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.