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Pages 43-84

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From page 43...
... 43 This chapter reviews the experiences of five different transit agencies that have instituted general public demand–response service. Denver RTD has been the pioneer in providing DRT by using advanced technologies and has had a successful track record for almost 10 years in over 20 Flex zones.
From page 44...
... 44 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice RTD has long been an agency that operates with strong service guidelines to promote efficiency. In 2000, RTD's general manager and staff informed the mayor and staff of the City of Brighton that their existing circulator route performed so poorly it would need to be discontinued.
From page 45...
... Case Examples 45 Figure 4. Location of Denver RTD's Call-n-Ride (CnR)
From page 46...
... 46 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice (and which typically have cycle times of 30 minutes or less) , there are typically more concentrated trip generators and productivity typically ranges from 5 to 9 passenger trips per hour, or approximately 50% more.
From page 47...
... Case Examples 47 As noted previously, RTD provides the vehicles their contractors use (Figure 5)
From page 48...
... 48 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice In a 2008 on-board survey of passengers, the Denver RTD's Call-n-Ride service had an overall customer satisfaction rating of 4.6 (on a 1–5 scale) compared with a 4.2 rating for the agency's fixed route bus service, with the former excelling in driver performance, comfort, security, customer information, and fares (5)
From page 49...
... Case Examples 49 addresses are eligible pickup or drop-off points. There is often a mix of modalities.
From page 50...
... 50 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice of relatively low density. However, RTD believes its DRT service has been successful at meeting agency objectives because • The service is more cost-effective, productive, and attractive than comparable bus service in many suburban areas with low-to-moderate density of 3 to 12 population + employment per acre and dispersed travel patterns and circuitous street networks.
From page 51...
... Case Examples 51 • Marketing promotions are even more difficult than for fixed route services. Marketing requires substantial coordination with communities affected and considerable outreach and direct promotions.
From page 52...
... 52 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice Figure 7. Map of the Houston METRO proposed Flex zones.
From page 53...
... Case Examples 53 for securing a trip: (1) boarding at one of two anchor points (Acres Homes Transit Center or Walmart)
From page 54...
... 54 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice Technology Utilized METRO uses Trapeze PASS 16 software to schedule trips through their live reservations agents, and many customers board the bus without reservations at either of the two anchor points on the hour and inform the operators where they would like to go. However, most of the customers use some type of telephone reservation.
From page 55...
... Case Examples 55 decision to retain the previously existing poor-performing fixed route bus service. The agency's intent was to eliminate that fixed route, but unforeseeable external political factors have prevented that from happening.
From page 56...
... 56 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice under way to try to implement a second general public demand–response transit service in an area that does not have fixed route bus service. It is hoped that this will prove to be a successful business case.
From page 57...
... Case Examples 57 company presented to SacRT that allowed the agency to gain a better understanding of the nature of the service that could be provided and what resources would be needed to achieve certain service goals. After reviewing significant amounts of simulation data, the SacRT staff developed a pilot project to transform CityRide into a new and improved "SmaRT Ride" service (Figure 11)
From page 58...
... 58 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice The ambitious goals of the SmaRT Ride On-Demand Transit service project were identified as follows: • Further test the viability of the microtransit concept. • Deliver coverage to underserved, disadvantaged, less-dense communities and provide connections to the rest of the SacRT system.
From page 59...
... Case Examples 59 of the CBS Division (34 operators) , it was not an issue to train all of them to operate the new SmaRT Ride service.
From page 60...
... 60 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice SacRT reported that dispatchers also took to the new scheduling software by TransLoc quickly, favoring it over the previous scheduling software that did not allow for ridesharing or for the re-batching of trips throughout the service day. The microtransit scheduling app tracks trips and is tied to a scheduling software program based on algorithms that rapidly build flexible and efficient transit routes to accommodate incoming trip requests.
From page 61...
... Case Examples 61 launch event) , and community outreach, which included presentations and staffing booths and the creation of a movie theater ad to reach thousands of potential customers, stakeholders, and community members.
From page 62...
... 62 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice operate from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
From page 63...
... Case Examples 63 for each trip. It appeared the service was used primarily to go shopping and to medical appointments.
From page 64...
... 64 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice At the conclusion of the pilot project, SacRT will determine opportunities for implementing the service in a number of other communities in its service area and intends to procure a permanent microtransit software solution. SacRT has developed concepts for additional microtransit service areas and intends to implement additional pilot routes before the end of 2018.
From page 65...
... Case Examples 65 World, and other smaller but popular venues in the region that attract tens of millions of tourists each year. A service economy and extreme suburban sprawl characterize the region.
From page 66...
... 66 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice Figure 18. LYNX service area with NeighborLink flex zones in dark gray.
From page 67...
... Case Examples 67 is coming from a fixed route transfer point, in which case no reservation is necessary. The customer must be waiting at the curb 5 minutes before the scheduled time.
From page 68...
... 68 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice week are accepted. This helps reduce reservations call volume, helps reduce call hold time, and helps enhance customer ease of access and satisfaction.
From page 69...
... Case Examples 69 Figure 21. Marketing brochure describing the NeighborLink transportation service and how to use it.
From page 70...
... 70 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice The same fare structure and fare media are used for both fixed route and NeighborLink services. Customers can pay with cash, daily/7-day/30-day passes, and now with smartphone mobile fare payment.
From page 71...
... Case Examples 71 An automated notice is sent to passengers that the vehicle is on its way and its progress can be viewed on a screen through the application. Other people with credentials that represent the passenger can also view the progress of the vehicle.
From page 72...
... 72 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice of the performance of other agencies identified in this report that provide such services. The cost per trip of $12.60 is among the lowest for on-demand services covered in this report and certainly well below the average of $23.56 (see Table 4)
From page 73...
... Case Examples 73 services to increase passengers per revenue hour while reducing costs per trip as they further explore and refine new mobility management principles. Lessons Learned LYNX shares the following lessons they believe might be useful for other transit systems as they embark on providing microtransit services.
From page 74...
... 74 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice circulator service with fixed route service, the pilot project was discontinued in November 2017. A single on-demand vehicle was no longer able to satisfy all trip requests within its duty cycle, but the expense of putting two on-demand vehicles into service would have exceeded the cost of re-instituting fixed route service that the agency ultimately believed made better sense.
From page 75...
... Case Examples 75 The design of the service was not to be curb to curb. Customers could use the service anywhere within the designated zone and be picked up or dropped off at any of 26 specified locations (green blue circles in Figure 24; see also Figure 25)
From page 76...
... 76 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice the bugs to be out of the system for the new on-demand service. The transition period also gave riders an opportunity to register and try the Connector before they made the transition permanently.
From page 77...
... Case Examples 77 multiplied by 2.5, plus 5 minutes. When multiple walk-ons boarded at the Glen Creek Transit Center after they had transferred from fixed route bus service, this standard was not met.
From page 78...
... 78 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice The same union that provided Cherriots fixed route service but that operated under a separate contract with the private provider represented the labor for the private contractor used for the on-demand service. However, Cherriots' local union representing fixed route operators made it clear that once the pilot project was completed, there was an expectation that the service would come in house and operate with employees represented by the union if the service was to be continued.
From page 79...
... Case Examples 79 Flyers describing the service were placed prominently in buses on fixed routes that were about to be replaced. There were explanations of the service at the Glen Creek Transit Center.
From page 80...
... 80 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice The Connector service was well received by customers, as indicated in results of online and phone surveys of passengers administered by Cherriots in the winter of 2016–2017 after the service had been in place for 18 months. The results of those surveys are as follows: Overall Experience -- 55% Very Good, 32% Good, 9% Neutral, 4% Poor, 0% Very Poor Booking Experience -- 55% Very Good, 18% Good, 23% Neutral, 4% Poor, 0% Very Poor Courteousness of Drivers -- 68% Very Good, 30% Good, 2% Neutral, 0% Poor, 0% Very Poor Plan to Ride Again -- 73% Yes, 23% Unsure, 4% No Recommend to Friends and Neighbors -- 86% Yes, 4% Unsure, 10% No Technology The transit district used DemandTrans, a software developer for the transit industry.
From page 81...
... Case Examples 81 able to see all their pickups and drop-offs on the screen, but it was not always clear when drivers should be at each pickup and drop-off point and in what order they should pick up and drop off riders. This led to issues with the accuracy of the estimated times given in the advance notifications.
From page 82...
... 82 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice certain hours. The number of times people had to wait 2 hours for their ride was increasing and becoming problematic.
From page 83...
... Case Examples 83 • When asked how riders felt about the West Salem Connector, 45% had positive feelings about the Connector, 29% were neutral, 18% had negative feelings, and 8% were unsure. • Of those who responded, 64% had ridden the Connector before, and 36% had never ridden the Connector.
From page 84...
... 84 Microtransit or General Public Demand–Response Transit Services: State of the Practice Change in Daily Revenue Hours Change in Daily Revenue Miles Estimated Change in Annual Cost –15.00 Varies –$246,000 +2.5 +$210,000 +16.2 +190.5 +$411,000 +0.8 +7.8 +$20,000 Status Route REMOVED West Salem Connector TOTAL Routes 26 & 27 Route 17 ADDED Route 16 +0.5 +27.3 +$25,000 Table 7. Cost estimates for replacing the West Salem Connector with fixed route service.

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