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1 Introduction
Pages 10-18

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From page 10...
... By responsibly, the committee believes that participants of the integrated National Airspace System must meet high standards in terms of the overall integrity of the vehicle, its navigation system, and its adherence to assigned path and airspace. The diverse set of envisioned advanced aerial mobility operations range from commercial transport and air taxi services to drone surveillance and inspection in urban to rural regions (see Figure 1.1)
From page 11...
... , air passenger and cargo transportation within or to/from a metropolitan area with vehicles ranging from small drones to passenger aircraft, including in some cases electrically powered vertical takeoff and landing capabilities. Although "urban air mobility" is the current, commonly accepted term, the committee considers UAM to be a subset of the overall subject, albeit the most challenging one.
From page 12...
... General hostility to a system that appears to benefit only the elite or wealthy can inhibit growth of advanced aerial mobility. The benefits and dynamics of a large-scale system are shown on the right.
From page 13...
... Part of the messaging and case studies will likely be services provided by other parts of advanced aerial mobility that will have the greatest impact and attraction by the public, such as first responders, disaster relief, crime reduction, and firefighting.1 Many of the early advances in aerial mobility are currently and will in the near future be made in nonurban areas, which are not as congested and have lower population densities. As the committee notes later in this report, introducing new forms of air transportation inside or outside of urban areas could have considerable community impacts involving safety, privacy, and environmental factors.
From page 14...
... for the benefit of humanity Capability Research Authority None FIGURE 1.3  Gaps between industry and the government agencies involved in making advanced aerial mobility possible. NOTE: NAS, National Airspace System.
From page 15...
... A vision, and a way to achieve it, is crucial if the United States is to realize this goal. Beyond technical hurdles and system engineering, advanced aerial mobility will require addressing societal acceptance and policy issues related to privacy concerns, community preferences, airspace allocation, and land use considerations.
From page 16...
... To understand the impact that truly accessible flight capability can have, it is helpful to understand that advanced aerial mobility represents the inclusion into this transportation mix of a mode that stands apart from GENERAL AVIATION FAILED TO SCALE Aircraft Production Pilot Population Growth challenges Inability to achieve  economies of scale Workload and complexity Increased cost for training Fewer pilots from military Sales volume low, prices rise Product liability costs add pain Commercial pilot career cyclicality Slowed innovation FAA certification approach GA offers limited utility for personal  transport Generally constrained to airports Used aircraft similar to new Competition from the used  aircraft market FIGURE 1.5  Factors in both the aircraft fleet and pilot population inhibited general aviation's progress and scale. NOTE: GA, general aviation.
From page 17...
... . As advanced aerial mobility matures and is deployed, each application has the potential to bring profound impact, because it represents the inclusion into the transportation mix of a nodal network -- a transportation mode that is not limited to linear physical path infrastructure (e.g., roads and rails)
From page 18...
... cost of air transportation is indicative of its high efficiency. Advanced aerial mobility development will evolve in response to technical, regulatory, and economic factors, generally taking the path of overall least resistance as the private and public sectors work in their respective roles to facilitate progress.


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