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From page 5...
... 5 Toolkit 1a: Safety Management System Template for Managing UAS in the Vicinity of Airports Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 6...
... 6 Contents  1  Safety Policy and Objectives .............................................................................................. 8  Safety Accountability ........................................................................................................................................
From page 7...
... 7   Active Safety Communication ...................................................................................................................... 17  5  Appendix 1: UAS Operation Request Form .....................................................................
From page 8...
... 8 1 Safety Policy and Objectives Safety Accountability Delegate who is responsible for unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) and safety performance.
From page 9...
... 9   1.2.4 Accident Investigation Board (AIB) An AIB will be convened as appropriate is to find the root cause of accidents/incidents and prevent them from reoccurring.
From page 10...
... 10   Obtaining Approval to Operate UAS Explains how to submit a UAS activity request with your organization Obtaining a Certificate of Authorization/Waiver (COA) A COA is an authorization issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
From page 11...
... 11 2 Safety Risk Management Safety Risk Management (SRM) is used to analyze systems, processes, and/or procedures to understand the critical characteristics of the risks associated with those activities and the operational environment in which they take place.
From page 12...
... 12 3. Determine the Risk Assessment Code based upon likelihood and severity of identified hazards 4.
From page 13...
... 13  Potential for uncontrollable public relations event(s) Critical  A large reduction in safety margins, physical distress and/or workload such that operators cannot be relied upon to perform their tasks accurately or completely  Serious injury or death, multiple long-term injuries and personal claims  Accident or Serious incident with injuries and/or major to moderate equipment damage  Potential criminal penalty  Medium environmental impact  Potential moderate damage to an aircraft (out of service >5 days)
From page 14...
... 14  No environmental impact  No security element affected  Initiative delivered against University policy and procedures  No public relations impact  No aircraft damage – no operational impact  Finding element present limited opportunities for improvement  2.1.4 Risk Assessment When the hazard is identified, it is brought into the risk assessment process and given a Risk Assessment Code (RAC) , from Figure 2.2 above.
From page 15...
... 15 2.3.2 Recording the Risk Management Process Risk management activities will be traceable. In the risk management process, records provide the foundation for improvement in methods and tools, as well as in the overall process.
From page 16...
... 16 3 Safety Assurance Safety Performance Monitoring and Measurement 3.1.1 Audits This section defines the types of audits that will take place and their definition and explanation. Create sub sections for the types of audits such as external, committee, insurance, and self-audits.
From page 17...
... 17 4 Safety Promotion Provide a statement summarizing the organization's role in promoting a culture of safety. Training Defines the type(s)
From page 18...
... 18 5 Appendix 1: UAS Operation Request Form UAS Operation Request Form * Requests must be submitted no later than X business days before the event Submitter Information Name: E-mail: Affiliation: Date of Request: Proposed location: Event Information Aircraft make/model: Aircraft weight (pounds)
From page 19...
... 19 6 Appendix 2: Initial Risk Assessment Form INITIAL OPERATIONS RISK ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTATION Risk Assessment For: Organization & Location Today's Date: Click for date Reason for Risk Assessment (select all that apply) : ☐New System Design ☐Modification to an Existing Operation or Procedure ☐ Change to Existing System Design ☐Operational Environmental Change ☐New Operational Procedure ☐Ineffective Risk Control ☐Other: PROCESS/SYSTEM ANALYSIS Brief description of process of system to be assessed: RISK ANALYSIS / HAZARD IDENTIFICATION HAZARD POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCE(S)
From page 20...
... 20 RISK Mitigation Plan System/Project: _ Responsible Manager: _ Hazard Control Substitute Risk Residual Risk H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 H6 H7 H8 H9 H10    
From page 21...
... 21 7 Appendix 3: Sample On-Site Risk Assessment 1 2 3 4 5 Rating O pe ra tio na l F ac to rs Type of Operation Normal Demo Training/ Recurrency Mx Checkout Test Flight Duration of Operation < 1 hour 1-2 hours 2-4 hours 4-6 hours >6 hours Simultaneous Operations 1 AV 2 AVs 3 AVs >3 AVs Pi lo t i n Co m m an d Fa ct or s Hours of Rest in Last 24 Hours >8 7-8 5-6 3-5 <3 # of Flights in Type >100 21-100 11-20 5-10 <5 # of Flights in Last 90 Days >10 6-10 3-5 1-2 0 Total UAS Hours >100 51-100 26-50 10-25 <10 E nv iro nm en ta l F ac to rs Current Wind <5 kts 5-10 kts 11-14 kts 15-20 kts >20 kts Forecast Wind for Landing Time <8 kts 9-12 kts 13-15 kts 16-20 kts >20 kts Weather Forecast for Operation Clear Reducing Visibility Precipitation T-Storm Surrounding Area Open Field (or Indoor, with no spectators) Vegetation Mountainous (or Indoor, with spectators)
From page 22...
... 22 8 Appendix 4: Sample UAS Incident/Accident Report Name: E-mail: Phone: Association: Aircraft Registration Number: Accident Date: Location of Accident: Accident Involved (e.g. serious injury, death, property damage greater than $500 -- other than Unmanned Aircraft)
From page 23...
... 23 Call Out Protocol / Chain of Command Property Damage Less than x$ Property Damage Greater than x$ Minor Injury Major Injury UAS Damage Only Public Relations Please refer to the SMS case study for an example of a call out protocol. This chart should be used to quickly find a point of contact for a specific accident or incident.
From page 24...
... 24 Toolkit 1b: Safety Management System Example for Managing UAS in the Vicinity of Airports Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 25...
... 25 Contents 1 Safety Policy and Objectives ............................................................................................ 28 Safety Accountability ......................................................................................................................................
From page 26...
... 26 Mandatory Incident/Accident Reporting System ..................................................................................... 42 Anonymous UAS Safety Reporting System (AUSRS)
From page 27...
... 27 "Our Commitment to Safety Culture Statement" Embry-Riddle's unique Safety Culture has been the foundation for our University's success throughout the years. It is embedded throughout every function within the University and instilled within every member of our community from day-one.
From page 28...
... 28 1 Safety Policy and Objectives Safety Accountability The overall implementation of the Safety Management System (SMS) lies with the Associate Vice President for Safety/Risk (AVP)
From page 29...
... 29 • Identify the likelihood and severity levels of risks and mitigate them to acceptable levels. • Identify appropriate levels of risk authority for the planned activity.
From page 30...
... 30 • Aviation Technical Advisor, Prescott • Student Clubs, Daytona • Student Clubs, Prescott • Student Clubs, Worldwide • ERAU Asia The committee will meet at a minimum once per quarter, or as necessary to meet its goals. 1.2.4 Accident Investigation Board (AIB)
From page 31...
... 31 It is the responsibility of the Person In Charge if Pilot In Command (PIC) is not on site to initiate the Emergency Response Plan.
From page 32...
... 32 UAS operated in violation of any federal, state, or local laws or contract provisions will be subject to grounding. UAS owned by ERAU will be operated under the authorization of the University and the FAA as situations warrant: • Authorizations could be in the form of written University approval, a Public Use Certificate of Authorization (COA)
From page 33...
... 33 operate safely with other airspace users. In most cases, FAA will provide a formal response within 60 days from the time a completed application is submitted.
From page 34...
... 34 2 Safety Risk Management Safety Risk Management (SRM) is used to analyze systems, processes, and/or procedures to understand the critical characteristics of the risks associated with those activities and the operational environment in which they take place.
From page 35...
... 35 2.1.2 Risk Analysis ERAU employs a SRB to perform an Initial Safety Risk Analysis (ISRA) to analyze all hazards that impact a given UAS operations' possible risks, and to develop controls to mitigate those risks.
From page 36...
... 36 2.1.3 Required definitions: LIKELIHOOD Frequent: Likely to occur many times; Will be continuously experienced unless action is taken to change events. Likely: The activity or event is expected to occur 50-90% of the time; Will occur often if events follow a normal process or procedure and is repeatable.
From page 37...
... 37 • Potential loss (breakdown) of entire subsystem or divisional operation • Production errors containing regulatory violations that pose direct consequence to the operation Moderate • Accident or incident with minor injury and/or minor aircraft damage • Non-life threatening employee/customer injury, with recording of Lost Time Injury • Small environmental impact • Security finding requiring a corrective action plan • Production element errors that may pose indirect consequences to the operation • Aircraft damage resulting in out of service < 5 days • Potential to cause sustained irregular operations until issue is resolved • Additional public relations efforts and resources required Minor • No regulatory action • No environmental impact anticipated • No evident security threat affected • Minor errors in completed University policy and procedures • Production errors containing quality system and/or opportunities for improvement • No equipment damage to slight damage – outcome deferrable with no operational impact • $0 Regulatory fines • No public relations impact Negligible • No regulatory violation • No environmental impact • No security element affected • Initiative delivered against University policy and procedures • No public relations impact • No aircraft damage – no operational impact Finding element present limited opportunities for improvement ERAU will mitigate identified hazards to a level ‘as low as reasonably practicable' (ALARP)
From page 38...
... 38 2.1.4 Risk Assessment When the hazard is identified, it is brought into the risk assessment process and given a Risk Assessment Code (RAC) , from Figure X above.
From page 39...
... 39 Risk management activities will be traceable. In the risk management process, records provide the foundation for improvement in methods and tools, as well as in the overall process.
From page 40...
... 40 3 Safety Assurance Safety Performance Monitoring and Measurement 3.1.1 Audits ERAU will periodically measure the effectiveness of its Flight Departments. The University will audit the overall program to ensure compliance with governmental regulations and to review the climate of the Safety Culture.
From page 41...
... 41 • Inspection and quality control of repair processes. • Records and record keeping procedures.
From page 42...
... 42 3.1.4 Advisory Committee Audits The Advisory Committee audit will be conducted by a team comprised of members of the ERAU Industrial Advisory Committee. • External Audits are to follow the audit process policy.
From page 43...
... 43 • Accident o Property Damage of any type (Other than UAV) o Injury of any type This report will be reviewed by the Safety Manager and escalated to the appropriate superior.
From page 44...
... 44 4 Safety Promotion Safety Promotion involves encouraging employees, students and operators alike to be accepting of the Safety Culture. If any entity feels that the Safety Culture is a hindrance, then the SMS will ultimately fail through inaccurate reporting, non-compliance or disregard for safety measures.
From page 45...
... 45 5 Appendix 1: UAS Operation Request Form UAS Operation Request Form * Requests must be submitted no later than 5 business days before the event Submitter Information Name: E-mail: Department: Date of Request: Proposed location: Event Information Aircraft make/model: Aircraft weight (pounds)
From page 46...
... 46 6 Appendix 2: Initial Risk Assessment INITIAL OPERATIONS RISK ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTATION Risk Assessment For: Organization & Location Today's Date: Click for date Reason for Risk Assessment (select all that apply) : ☐New System Design ☐Modification to an Existing Operation or Procedure ☐ Change to Existing System Design ☐Operational Environmental Change ☐New Operational Procedure ☐Ineffective Risk Control ☐Other: PROCESS/SYSTEM ANALYSIS Brief description of process of system to be assessed: RISK ANALYSIS / HAZARD IDENTIFICATION HAZARD POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCE(S)
From page 47...
... 47 RISK Mitigation System/Project: _ Responsible Manager: _ Hazard Control Substitute Risk Residual Risk H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 H6 H7 H8 H9 H10
From page 48...
... 48 7 Appendix 3: Sample OSRA 1 2 3 4 5 Rating O pe ra tio na l Fa ct or s Type of Operation Normal Demo Training/ Recurrency Mx Checkout Test Flight Duration of Operation < 1 hour 1-2 hours 2-4 hours 4-6 hours >6 hours Simultaneous Operations 1 AV 2 AVs 3 AVs >3 AVs PI C Fa ct or s Hours of Rest in Last 24 Hours >8 7-8 5-6 3-5 <3 # of Flights in Type >100 21-100 11-20 5-10 <5 # of Flights in Last 90 Days >10 6-10 3-5 1-2 0 Total UAS Hours >100 51-100 26-50 10-25 <10 E nv iro nm en ta l F ac to rs Current Wind <5 kts 5-10 kts 11-14 kts 15-20 kts >20 kts Forecast Wind for Landing Time <8 kts 9-12 kts 13-15 kts 16-20 kts >20 kts Weather Forecast for Operation Clear Reducing Visibility Precip T-Storm Surrounding Area Open Field (or Indoor, with no spectators) Vegetation Mountainous (or Indoor, with spectators)
From page 49...
... 49 8 Appendix 4: Sample UAS Incident/Accident Report Name: E-mail: Phone: Campus: Department/Club: Aircraft Registration Number: Accident Date: Location of Accident: The Accident involved… o Serious Injury o Death o Property Damage greater than 500 (other than Unmanned Aircraft) Description of Accident:
From page 50...
... 50 Description of Accident: Call Out Protocol Property Damage Less than 500$ Property Damage Greater than 500$ Minor Injury Major Injury UAS Damage Only Public Relations Flight Training Standardization Manager Flight Training Standardization Manager Flight Training Standardization Manager Flight Training Standardization Manager Flight Training Standardization Manager Flight Training Standardization Manager Department Chair Associate Vice President Safety/Risk Associate Vice President Safety/Risk Associate Vice President Safety/Risk Department Chair Department Chair Associate Vice President Safety/Risk Department Chair Department Chair Department Chair Associate Vice President Safety/Risk Campus Safety Dean Campus Safety Chancellor Dean Dean President Chancellor Chancellor President President
From page 51...
... 51 9 Appendix 5: DB Sample Emergency Response Plan Person In Charge • If necessary, call 911 • Render First Aid as necessary • Contact UAS Flight Training Standardization Manager via call out list • Preserve accident/incident site to ensure aircraft wreckage is not tampered with • Secure the Ground Control Station/device Flight Training Standardization Manager (FTSM) • Obtain Crash bag and proceed to site • Contact the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
From page 52...
... 52 Department Chair • If necessary, activate the Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
From page 53...
... 53 • Assist the Director of Media Relations, Corporate Communications in facilitating communications with employees and students, as appropriate, via the broadcast voice, e-mail and/or RAVE messages. • Communication liaison between appropriate law enforcement and/or rescue agencies.
From page 54...
... 54 Director of Media Relations, Corporate Communications • The Director of Media Relations, Corporate Communications is the only authorized source of information to the media. • The primary meeting area for media is dependent on the situation and location.
From page 55...
... 55 10 Appendix 6: Audit Process Policy An audit is to focus on the safety aspects of flight operations, maintenance, and the quality of the overall Safety Program. Emphasis will be on management effectiveness and organizational Safety Culture.
From page 56...
... 56 • Facilities ❖ Operations • Operations manual • Flight operations • Flight training facilities • Flight training aircraft • Flight training personnel • All manuals as applicable ❖ Provide recommendations of flight operations for Risk Management The following areas shall be audited in addition to the above: External audits • Provide recommendations for Advisory Committee flight operation safety evaluations • Evaluation of the management process • Evaluation of the effectiveness and organizational Safety Culture Advisory Committee audits • Provide recommendations for Advisory Committee flight operation safety evaluations • Compliance with all applicable FAR's, AC's, SDR's etc. • Curriculum review • Evaluation of Risk Management process • Survey compliance and safety "attitude" at both campuses Insurance audits • Compliance with all applicable FAR's, AC's, SDR's etc.
From page 57...
... 57 • Crew Resource Management program. • Flight dispatch coordination, including scheduling, and flight/duty time management.
From page 58...
... 58 11 Appendix 6: Combined Audit Schedule Campus Audit type Year Daytona University Safety Office Prescott External External External 2011 2011 2011 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott Insurance Insurance Insurance 2012 2012 2012 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott Self Self Self 2013 2013 2013 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott Advisory Advisory Advisory 2014 2014 2014 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott Insurance Insurance Insurance 2015 2015 2015 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott External External External 2016 2016 2016 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott Self Self Self 2017 2017 2017 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott Advisory Advisory Advisory 2018 2018 2018 Daytona University Safety Office Prescott External External External 2019 2019 2019
From page 59...
... Toolkit 1c: UAS Operation Request Form Template for Managing UAS in the Vicinity of Airports Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS D M 31 2019
From page 60...
... 60 UAS Operation Request Form * Requests must be submitted no later than X business days before the event Submitter Information Name: E-mail: Affiliation: Date of Request: Proposed location: Event Information Aircraft make/model: Aircraft weight (pounds)
From page 61...
... Toolkit 1d: Initial Risk Assessment Form Template for Managing UAS in the Vicinity of Airports Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 62...
... 62 INITIAL OPERATIONS RISK ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTATION Risk Assessment For: Organization & Location Today's Date: Click for date Reason for Risk Assessment (select all that apply) : ☐New System Design ☐Modification to an Existing Operation or Procedure ☐ Change to Existing System Design ☐Operational Environmental Change ☐New Operational Procedure ☐Ineffective Risk Control ☐Other: PROCESS/SYSTEM ANALYSIS Brief description of process of system to be assessed: RISK ANALYSIS / HAZARD IDENTIFICATION HAZARD POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCE(S)
From page 63...
... 63 RISK Mitigation Plan System/Project: _ Responsible Manager: _ Hazard Control Substitute Risk Residual Risk H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 H6 H7 H8 H9 H10
From page 64...
... 64 Toolkit 2: Safety Risk Assessment Checklist Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 65...
... 65 Safety Risk Assessment Checklist guide / onsite checklist  Meets legal requirements  Land owner permission  Communication  Type of flight  What is the hazard (low, medium, high)  Operating conditions  PIC condition (include certifications or if supervised student pilot)
From page 66...
... 66 The following table provides a scoring metric for aggregating risk across Operational Factors, Pilot in Command Factors, and Environmental Factors. Adding up the individual score will provide a high level analysis of the potential risk of an operation.
From page 67...
... 67 Toolkit 3: UAS Aircraft Performance Table Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 68...
... 68 Pl at fo rm Example aircraft Size Speed Duration Range Ground Infrastructure Uses M ul ti ro to r ( sm al l < 55 lb s) DJI Mavic Pro https://www.dji.com /mavic 1.62 lbs (734 g)
From page 69...
... 69 Pl at fo rm Example aircraft Size Speed Duration Range Ground Infrastructure Uses Aerosonde https://www.textron systems.com/whatwe-do/unmannedsystems/aerosonde 80 lbs Empty 40-65 kts 14+ hrs 92 km Rail launch system Ground control station Operated by Textron as part of the ISR services contract T ac tic al (l ar ge ) MQ-1B Predator http://www.af.mil/A bout-Us/FactSheets/Display/Artic le/104469/mq-1bpredator/ 1,130 pounds Empty 84-135 mph 24+ hrs 770 miles Crew of 2 Ground control station 5,000 by 75foot (1,524 meters by 23 meters)
From page 70...
... 70 Toolkit 4: Airspace and Airport Diagram Charts Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 71...
... 71 Contents 1 Airspace Classification Chart ........................................................................................... 72 2 Airport Diagram Charts ....................................................................................................
From page 72...
... 72 1 Airspace Classification Chart UAS are legally allowed to fly in class G airspace below 400ft within 5 nm of an airport, this chart shows the classification of airspace and where class G is designated. https://www.faasafety.gov/gslac/ALC/course_content.aspx?
From page 73...
... 73 2 Airport Diagram Charts Sample Airport Diagram An airport diagram depectics areonautical information in and around an airport providing critical information for manned and UAS operations. https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/flight_info/aeronav/digital_products/aero_guide/media/editions /cug-complete.pdf
From page 74...
... 74 Obstruction Identification 3D Surfaces Part-77 Diagram This ALP Part 77 Surface Map shows the conical and transitional surfaces that might be penetrated by UAS operations and should be included in FAA UAS Facility Maps. https://www.ngs.noaa.gov/AERO/oisspec.html
From page 75...
... 75 3 UAS Facility Maps These maps, available online, are for informational and planning purposes to identify airspace where the FAA may authorize operations without additional safety analysis and should be consulted as a resource when applying for a Part 107 Airspace Waiver and Authorization. In controlled airspace, the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC)
From page 76...
... 76 Toolkit 5: Sample NOTAMs and DROTAMs Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 77...
... 77 Contents 1 NOTAMs and DROTAMs: .............................................................................................. 78 2 Examples: .........................................................................................................................
From page 78...
... 78 1 NOTAMs and DROTAMs: This toolkit item includes both NOTAM and DROTAM examples. These are included to assist in the making of DROTAMS and how they differ from NOTAMs.
From page 79...
... 79 2 Examples: NOTAMs ! PIT 05/400 PIT TWY P SFC PAINTED HLDG PSN SIGNS FOR RWY 10R/28L NORTH SIDE NOT STD 1805291918-1808011000 Issuing Airport: (PIT)
From page 80...
... 80 This is a sample NOTAM issued for Killeen-Fort Hood Regional Airport and Southern California Logistics Airport (Neubauer 2015)
From page 81...
... 81 Toolkit 6: Sample UAS Operational Plan Template Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 82...
... 82 Contents 1 Title Page .......................................................................................................................... 83 2 Overview ...........................................................................................................................
From page 83...
... 83 1 Title Page Provide a name of the operation as well as the date of the operation. 2 Overview Identify the current operating environment for sUAS in the NAS 3 Background This section is for a description of the background of the organization and the proposed flight projects.
From page 84...
... 84 Resources A series of resources will be required to successfully complete the activities outlined in this operational plan. This section contains the details of these resources and how they will be used.
From page 85...
... 85 The communication protocol for UAS operations is an important consideration to plan for all missions. At towered airports, a preliminary protocol should be developed already from previous coordination activities with the tower.
From page 86...
... 86 • Loss of control/Lost Link • Loss of communications • Loss of visual/position Non-Punitive reporting mechanism Questionable practices or violation of law and/or policies, participants will be encouraged to report the details of the occurrence to: List available representatives and their contact information.
From page 87...
... 87 Toolkit 7: Sample Landowner Permission for UAS Operations Document Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 88...
... 88 SAMPLE APPLICATION AND PERMIT FOR USE OF AN UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS (UAS) Application must be submitted not less than 10 days prior to use date.
From page 89...
... 89 Permission is hereby granted to: Permittee Name:_______________________________________________________________________ Organization:__________________________________________________________________________ Activity:______________________________________________________________________________ Location/Area: ________________________________________________________________________ Date(s) :_______________________, 20___ between the hours of ________ and ________, subject to the terms and conditions described below.
From page 90...
... 90 8. Violation of permit terms may result in rescission of the permit.
From page 91...
... 91 Toolkit 8: Sample Airport UAS Policy Documents Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 92...
... 92 Contents 1 Examples of Airport Policy Documents: .......................................................................... 93 2 UAS Policy Template .......................................................................................................
From page 93...
... 93 1 Examples of Airport Policy Documents: Airport Topics Addressed Link Sea-Tac (KSEA) Limits to airspace and coordination requirements by type Airport contacts Reference Links Map of UAS no-fly zone and 5-mile notice area https://www.portseattle.org/page/seatac-airport-operation-rules-dronesuavuas Boise (KBOI)
From page 94...
... 94 Airport Topics Addressed Link Pittsburgh International (KPIT) Hobbyist Rules B4UFly info Contact info for PIT and AGC airports Guidance on reporting unsafe activity Reference links http://www.flypittsburgh.com/newsroo m/drones Ormond Beach Municipal (KMON)
From page 95...
... 95 2 UAS Policy Template Based on the policies listed above several important components of an airport UAS policy are described below. Overview Provide a high-level summary of the airport or representative body's policy (e.g.
From page 96...
... 96 Toolkit 9: UAS Airport Operations FAQs and Other Resources Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 97...
... 97 Contents 1 Business FAQ for UAS Operations at Airports ................................................................ 99 Infrastructure and costs considerations ......................................................................................................
From page 98...
... 98 Are there special restrictions / approval process for SAC-Experimental UAS operations from or in the vicinity of airports?
From page 99...
... 99 1 Business FAQ for UAS Operations at Airports With technical and operational development of UAS operations, U.S. airports should be able to accommodate businesses utilizing UAS for commercial activities at or in the vicinity of airports.
From page 100...
... 100 UAS market size, economic impact, and other information for public outreach 1.2.1 What information should typically be shared with the public to inform the public about UAS operations? Building community support for UAS operations at airports is important, as airport surrounding communities need to be informed about UAS operators and UAS flight activities than may impact them.
From page 101...
... 101 Figure 1: Model Registrations by Week Source: FAA Aerospace Forecast 2018-2038 (FAA, 2018) Figure 2: Commercial sUAS Registrations by Quarter (FAA, 2018)
From page 102...
... 102 Figure 3: Forecast of 55 lbs+ public and commercial UAS in the NAS versus GA aircraft Source: UAS forecast by Volpe; GA aircraft forecast by FAA Table 1, Table 2, and Table 3 present Forecast International (FI) projections of UAS production (in both number of units and monetary values)
From page 103...
... 103 Table 2. Major UAS Companies Company % Share Main System Northrop Grumman 19.64 Global Hawk General Atomics 11.75 Predator IAI 2.96 Heron AAI 2.05 Shadow Boeing 1.42 ScanEagle All Others 62.18 Source: Forecast International The United States dominates the development of UAS with 38.1 percent ($11 billion)
From page 104...
... 104 Personnel training for UAS operations 1.3.1 Are there any organizations that provide personnel training for UAS operations? Yes, there are many government and commercial organizations provide UAS training.
From page 105...
... 105 UAS airport integration planning 1.5.1 What resources exist for airport planning or other consulting to better aid airports in UAS integration planning? A good resource is ACRP report 144: Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)
From page 106...
... 106 2 Legal FAQs What should I do if I see a UAS crash on or around the airport property? The Remote Pilot is obligated to assess the damage to third parties or injuries to persons and notify the FAA.
From page 107...
... 107 Likewise, where does a person go to see whether there are any Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) available at or around a local airport?
From page 108...
... 108 3 References FAA.
From page 109...
... 109 4 Other FAQs and Resources The FAA provides guidance for airports/airspace with respect to what is allowed for commercial and recreational users, as well as what to do in the case of an accident/incident. Additionally, there are instructions for those commercial operators requiring waivers/authorizations to operate in their airspace.
From page 110...
... 110 An example of a State Department of Transportation policy guidance. This delves into the rules for public UAS use.
From page 111...
... Toolkit 10: Engagement and Communication Strategies Prepared for: AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (ACRP) Project 03-42: Airports and UAS
From page 112...
... 112 Contents 1 Websites and Webpages .................................................................................................. 113 2 Social Media ....................................................................................................................
From page 113...
... 113 1 Websites and Webpages The efficiency, benefits, and challenges of using a website as a UAS communication and engagement mechanism is summarized in the following table. WEBSITE/PAGE FUNCTION EXAMPLES BENEFITS CHALLENGES • Information, documentation, multi-media hosting and curation • Calendar, Schedule • Directories (point-of-contact identification)
From page 114...
... 114 2 Social Media This table provides a summary of benefits and challenges of social media as an engagement and outreach tool. Similar to websites, social media provides various online platforms and approaches to reach stakeholders.
From page 115...
... 115 IN-PERSON INFORMATION SESSIONS EXAMPLES BENEFITS CHALLENGES • Townhall Meetings • Community Roundtable • Conference • Symposium FAA (FAA TV) , UAS Integration Pilot Program Webinar Mohawk Valley Community College's Center for Corporate & Community Education and the STEM Center and SkyOp, LLC, Drone/Unmanned Aerial Systems Training Information Session 4 Education and Training This table higlights some areas in the growing network of education resources, both free and paid, that are related to UAS.
From page 116...
... 116 5 Documentation This table provides a summary of benefits and challenges of using documents as an engagement and outreach tool. The exchange of documentation provides the opportunity to share information to a desired audience through materials that can be distributed using websites or through direct exchange (physical or digital)
From page 117...
... 117 DOCUMENTS CATEGORY EXAMPLES BENEFITS CHALLENGES • Press Releases FAA UAS Test Site Designation (Cifuentes, 2014) American Association of Airport Executives Press Releases ([doc]
From page 118...
... 118 DOCUMENTS CATEGORY EXAMPLES BENEFITS CHALLENGES How to Label your UAS (FAA, n.d.-f)

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