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4 Systematizing Recovery Efforts to Mitigate the Next Pandemic
Pages 37-54

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From page 37...
... Finally, several tools for recovery and capacity building were presented, including ensuring sustainable vaccine manufacture, creating a global pathogen monitoring network, and a vaccine champion group to improve health literacy. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Many SDOH emerged as key factors related to COVID-19 risk of exposure and severity for populations around the world.
From page 38...
... , highlighted how racism, discrimination, SDOH, and a need for better community engagement were evident and influential during COVID-19, and how they are relevant to other present and future public health challenges. Race and Health Disparities Pérez-Stable explained that the existing racial, ethnic, and health dis parities among Black, Latino/a/x, Indigenous, working, and disadvantaged people came to the forefront during COVID-19.1 For instance, COVID-19 has highlighted that race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are predictors for many negative health outcomes such as stroke and type 2 diabetes, even when controlling for other factors such as behavior (Gu et al., 2020)
From page 39...
... . Community Engagement The Moderna vaccine trials, Pérez-Stable explained, elucidated that increased structure in community engagement is necessary to achieve diversity in study participation, which requires time, investments, and infrastructure.3 The Moderna vaccine trials were initially not as inclusive of underserved minority populations as leaders had hoped.4 Therefore, 3  At the time of the workshop, a vaccine to protect against COVID-19 that is made by Moderna has received emergency use authorization from the U.S.
From page 40...
... initiative, which focused on inclusive research through COVID-19 awareness and communication.6 This initiative allowed academic researchers who are familiar with community engagement to partner with community organizations, health departments, and other organizations that might be interested in health and health disparities, such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, as well as faith-based and advocacy-based organizations. PérezStable said that CEAL could be a framework for future community-engaged research.
From page 41...
... The initiatives described include the Penn Medicine Center vaccination clinic in Philadelphia, the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, the COVID-19 response of the New Mexico Department of Health, and community engagement strategies in Paraguay. Care Equity in Philadelphia Lauren Hahn, senior innovation manager at Penn Medicine ­Center for Digital Health, also highlighted the evident inequalities during COVID-19 and the need for "intentional efforts to reduce these disparities." COVID-19 vaccination rates are associated with race and wealth, she stated.
From page 42...
... The first key factor in the success of the Penn Medicine Center vaccination clinic was an emphasis on multidisciplinary partnerships, both from within the hospital and the community, Hahn explained. For instance, outpatient health care professionals were redirected to infectious disease and emergency preparedness.
From page 43...
... . CHWs and patient navigators, employed by social support organizations, are embedded in the hospital health care team, Peretz explained, so they can tackle SDOH within health care services.
From page 44...
... Peretz reported on the success of the CHW program, saying that among adult CHW program participants from 2012 to 2021 with diabetes, 62 per cent experienced decreases in their HbA1C levels,8 and 89 percent met their medication management goals. Within the pediatric asthma CHW program, hospitalizations decreased by 76 percent and emergency department visits decreased by 68 percent, she added.
From page 45...
... A community vaccine equity task force was part of the ICS, which ensured that underserved communities were prioritized in responses such as mobile team support. Miranda Durham, the northwest region health officer and vaccine planning chief for the New Mexico Department of Health, explained that another important aspect of achieving equity using the ICS was establishing regular staff meetings that include data teams, CHWs, medical students, and public health professionals.
From page 46...
... Rapid Community Assessment Tool in A ­ lbuquerque to identify some barriers in access to vaccines: registration app, lack of knowledge regarding whether there is vaccination fee, and confusion about vaccine transportation assistance. The community was also involved in proposing possible solutions: alternative registration methods, increased support in using the registration app, clear messages about free vaccination, paid time from work to be vaccinated, or accessible vaccination sites, especially in Latino/a/x communities.
From page 47...
... . SOURCES: Guillermo Sequera presentation, September 23, 2021; Johns Hopkins University CSSE COVID-19 Data.
From page 48...
... Sequera highlighted the importance of including women in panel discussions and policy formulations regarding grief and pandemic effects. He also warned against solely prioritizing large hospital facilities over primary care facilities, which are predominantly staffed with women, in terms of financial support and policies.
From page 49...
... Sequera agreed, explaining that if community members are not included as active stakeholders, they are less likely to support public health initiatives. Parajón emphasized the need for continuous evaluation of these community engagement efforts, noting that community engagement must happen with a proper structure, plan, datagathering mechanism, and sufficient staff who can analyze and operationalize the data.
From page 50...
... But because cloud storage is now accessible and relatively cheap, it is an effective solution to the data storage barrier. DeRisi said that currently, his laboratory is working to create a global emerging pathogen monitoring network, which can aid in rapid dissemination, uniformity of analysis, and increased international transparency of emerging pathogens.
From page 51...
... First, she said, limited health literacy in the general public means that individuals do not have the proper information to make informed decisions or do not know when or how to seek health care services, leading to higher rates of hospitalizations, emergency room visits, and vaccine hesitancy, and lower rates of preventative measure uptake. Second, Madad said that "ongoing, consistent, and reliable science and risk communication" would help health care workers and the general public to better support evidence-based public health measures.
From page 52...
... Further­more, Cutler believed that strong scientific support within public health, as seen regarding climate change, will help propel commitment to public health innovation and investment. It would also be important to incentivize multidisciplinary collaboration between public health and health care, Madad and Kruk emphasized.
From page 53...
... SYSTEMATIZING RECOVERY EFFORTS 53 communication. Furthermore, Kruk added that informing the public of how their information will be used can help individuals feel safer and more willing to allow public health officials to collect their data, which can then be used for more effective public health communication and interventions.
From page 54...
... PREPUBLICATION COPY -- Uncorrected Proofs


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