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1 Introduction
Pages 1-10

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From page 1...
... The first session, held in March, was an introduction that focused specifically on what it means to take a "syndemic" approach to COVID-19,1 and what the implications would be for global recovery. Discussions centered on the multifactorial nature of COVID-19 as a syndemic, including its amplification of existing health threats and the socioeconomic risk factors that affect disease outcomes in different communities.2 The second workshop in the series focused more broadly on key ­lessons and emerging data from ongoing pandemic response efforts that can be incorporated into current health systems to improve resilience and preparedness for future outbreaks.
From page 2...
... Chapter 4 discusses recovery efforts to mitigate the next pandemic through community engagement and other tools for capacity building. Finally, Chapter 5 features strategies for a post-COVID pandemic world by using the lessons that have been learned throughout 2020 and 2021 in biomedical research, public health policy responses, and community engagement and partnership.
From page 3...
... Clark underscored that the COVID-19 pandemic hit during a time of numerous intersecting global challenges, not the least of which are biodiversity loss, climate change, intractable conflicts, and entrenched poverty and insecurity. She added that each one becomes a mutually reinforcing threat multiplier to the others.
From page 4...
... Extrapolating based on the effects of human immunodeficiency virus, she said these children could be at a higher risk of developmental delays, experience mental health difficulties, and become vulnerable to abuse. Health Inequities Clark highlighted the increased likelihood of minority ethnic groups being harmed by the pandemic and said IP was convinced that existing inequalities increased opportunities for exposure and spread of the virus.
From page 5...
... IP was very clear that the global pandemic preparedness and response could not be left to health administrators and the WHO alone, and that there is a need for a whole of government response and multisectoral efforts, both internationally and within national governments. IP called for new mechanisms and for a strengthened WHO with the "independence, funding, and authority it needs to play the role it must play." IP also strongly advocated for the establishment of a global health threats council composed of heads of state and government to ensure ongoing high-level political leadership and awareness around pandemic preparedness and response.
From page 6...
... Al Kuwari believed that Qatar is managing the pandemic well, but because of global inequalities, she recognized it is still at risk from other countries and ongoing infection rates. She shared several of her country's lessons learned throughout this process (see Box 1-1)
From page 7...
... wellness for the general public, recovered patients, and the health care workforce. Second, she anticipated seeing more evidence of "long COVID." There will also likely be unavoidable delays to accessing health care during acute outbreaks, resulting in a need to address a significant backlog.
From page 8...
... In conclusion, she expressed confidence that health systems in countries can become stronger, but only by harnessing collective experiences can they ensure that systems will be well prepared to detect and respond to future crises. Discussion In terms of positive outcomes from the COVID-19 experience, Clark noted that it did get people thinking that perhaps there could be a recovery that was more inclusive and more equitable than the systems of the past.
From page 9...
... She also called for the implementation of the IP report recommendations, as well as improving the financing of health care, developing a robust health care workforce, and encouraging health care workers to become advocates for patient safety. PREPUBLICATION COPY -- Uncorrected Proofs
From page 10...
... PREPUBLICATION COPY -- Uncorrected Proofs


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