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From page 32...
... 32 C H A P T E R 2 Measuring Changes in Air Service and Regional Economic Activity This chapter offers an overview of the basic measures of air service and socioeconomic data that are most relevant to quantifying the relationship between the two concepts. "Socioeconomic" data refers to those metrics used to measure changes in a region's economy and society, such as changes in the population, its education, and employment.
From page 33...
... 33 Basic Data Element: Passenger Service General Definition routing" reflects the full itinerary that a passenger flies and may contain one or more segments or flights. O&D routings with one segment are called nonstop.
From page 34...
... 34 Federal regulations require airlines and airports to report significant amount of data to the Department of Transportation (BTS)
From page 35...
... 35 The 2014 ACRP report on the economic impacts of air cargo on the regional economy noted the difficulty of quantifying the economic effects of air cargo in the regional economy. However, it is generally agreed that industries are concentrated within regions with direct access to air cargo operations.
From page 36...
... 36 Table 6: Summary of Major Economic Metrics Indicator Description Employment The number of jobs or employees (or some other measure of labor such as Full Time Equivalent) associated with the activity that is being examined.
From page 37...
... 37 • U.S. Census Bureau (USCB)
From page 38...
... 38 They cover a range of topics beyond transportation and economic activity, such as criminal justice, environmental matters, aging, and health. There are 13 designated "principal statistical agencies" (https://nces.ed.gov/fcsm/agencies.asp)
From page 39...
... 39 making the information available at little or no effort to the user. This can be valuable for those with available funds but a lack of time needed to scour public websites and assemble data into useable formats.
From page 40...
... 40 may arise due to differentials in the key factors of production that include land, labor and capital. A competitive advantage in any of these factors can trigger an economy of scale capable of generating higher wages and productivity levels in certain places.
From page 41...
... 41 Figure 21: Examples of Regional Clusters Identified by the U.S. Cluster Mapping Project Source: Adapted from U.S.
From page 42...
... 42 An LQ is calculated by comparing an industry's share of local employment with its share of national employment. Consequently, LQs reveal the concentration of an industry within a specific area to the concentration of that industry nationwide.
From page 43...
... 43 Within each major component may be multiple indicators. The economic component, for example, may include measures of income, housing costs and quality, transportation accessibility, and highway congestion.
From page 44...
... 44 from external economic downturns. On the other hand, regional economists, economic developers and others have emphasized the value of industry clusters (specialization)
From page 45...
... 45 ACRP Report 98 includes information on airport catchment areas, especially in those situations where a region may be served by more than one airport. In such instances, airport catchment areas can overlap with one another.
From page 46...
... 46 Figure 22: The Reno–Tahoe MSA vs. its Catchment Area – More than one airport may be located within an MSA.
From page 47...
... 47 Sugar Land MSA includes both George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH) and William P
From page 48...
... 48 all of the businesses (by type) within that area.
From page 49...
... 49 For the drive time analysis illustrated above, information is readily available on: – The population within the region and changes over time – The "daytime" population, separating residents from workers – The population within the standard "working age" (between 18 and 64) – Unemployment rate – Percent of the population with college degrees (Bachelor's and higher)
From page 50...
... 50 Figure 24: Simplified Diagram of Input–Output Flows Air Service Is an Input to the Production of Goods and Services by Other Industries Commercial air service is itself an economic activity, but it is also an input to other businesses in the regional economy. The BEA's national I-O tables provide insight into how commercial aviation is "consumed" in the economy, whether by households (i.e., leisure travel)
From page 51...
... 51 Figure 25: The End Users of Commercial Air Transport Measuring Changes in Connectivity The IATA, the trade association representing the world's airlines including many of the largest U.S. carriers, has researched the value that improving air transport connectivity brings to regional economies.
From page 52...
... 52 passengers can fly to points 5-8 and additional locations 9-12. Connectivity for travelers from Airport A to points 5-8 improved because of the additional travel options, and now travelers from Airport A gained access to another four markets.
From page 53...
... 53 Similar findings have been reported in other studies of connectivity. A study from the consulting firm PriceWatershouseCoopers (2017)
From page 54...
... 54 that the availability of a commercial service airport is a significant factor to consider when contemplating the establishment or relocation of a business. (Pennsylvania DOT, p.

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