Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:


Pages 55-65

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 55...
... 55 C H A P T E R 3 Analyzing the Data: Case Studies Illustrate Changes in Air Service and Regional Economic Activity Reflecting the broader objective to help as many airports and communities as possible with understanding the relationship between air service and economic development, the project team examined changes in air service and socioeconomic measures for all U.S. primary service airports and the regions they serve for the period 2008-2019.
From page 56...
... 56 First, the team excluded airports where air service was provided only because of the EAS program. By definition, the EAS program subsidizes air service to regions where commercial service would not otherwise be provided.
From page 57...
... 57 Table 8 : Airport – CSA/MSA Summary: Airports within Major Statistical Areas Total Primary Service Airports 403 EAS Airports 63 Subtotal – Non-EAS Airports 340 Airports within an CSA 193 Airports outside an CSA but inside an MSA 86 Subtotal 279 Airports outside either a CSA or MSA 61 Airports within a MicroSA 26 Airports outside of an MSA or MicroSA 35 Note: MicroSAs or Micropolitan Statistical Areas are similar to MSAs but smaller. MicroSAs have at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
From page 58...
... 58 The key socioeconomic data analyzed were: – Total population – Total employment – Employment in selected industry sectors (e.g., manufacturing; IT; finance and real estate; PST services; management of companies) – Regional economic strength, determined by: – Location quotients – Presence of strength in selected economic clusters Time Period of Analysis The project team examined the air service and economic data for three years: 2008, 2015, and 2019.
From page 59...
... 59 tonnage and separate measures of activity and tonnage by integrators (e.g., FedEx) , pure or "dedicated" freight operators (e.g., Atlas Air)
From page 60...
... 60 Figure 27: Case Study Airport Locations, Size, and Nature of Operation Examined Observations from the Case Studies For each airport region, the team prepared both a comprehensive case study and an abbreviated version to meet different readers' levels of interest. On average, the full versions of the case studies are about 15 pages in length while the short versions are 2-3 pages.
From page 61...
... 61 between total O&D traffic and regional employment in the greater Fresno, California region. Figure 29 focuses the analysis onto changes in total O&D traffic and employment in "aviation-dependent" industry sectors in the Greater Des Moines region.
From page 62...
... 62 Figure 28 : Scatterplot of Total O&D Traffic and Total Regional Employment, Fresno Area Figure 29: Scatterplot of Total O&D Traffic and Employment in Aviation-Reliant Industry Sectors, Greater Des Moines Regions served by airports with international air service had evidence of increasing foreign investment and job growth. Increases in those types of economic activity were especially clear in the regions served by
From page 63...
... 63 AUS, SAN, and RDU, where new nonstop service to Europe contributed to new foreign investment by European-based firms. Engagement with Regional Stakeholder Organizations All the case study airports engaged with one or more regional economic stakeholders for purposes of air service development.
From page 64...
... 64 the value of air service is not simply about making it easier for corporate executives to visit the region but also contributing toward a standard of living that will attract the businesses and residents who want to see the community thrive. Measuring Changes in Connectivity For most case study region airports, connectivity declined following the Great Recession but then improved as the airline industry and national economy recovered.
From page 65...
... 65 air service facilitates not only economic growth but a high quality of growth that supports a higher standard of living and a more resilient economy. Conveying Economic Impact and How Air Service Supports Regional Economic Activity Airports and stakeholders tended to focus mostly on airport economic impact assessments rather than evaluations of how changes in air service contributes to broader regional economic development.

Key Terms



This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.