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Pages 55-61

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From page 55...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-6 Figure 3-3 Summary of Fare-Free Transit Impacts Access, Mobility & Equity Benefits  Increases transit ridership  Reduces financial barriers to accessing transit  Mitigates impacts of historically inequitable transportation policy  Increases focus on operating service over collecting revenue  Eliminates fare-related policing  Expands access to those who do not benefit from discounted programs provided through employers Costs  May constrain funding that could be spent on service  May lead to more regressive source of funding (e.g., sales tax) Operational Efficiency Benefits  Increases service productivity  May decrease dwell times, increasing speed and reliability  Eliminates fare-related disputes  Eliminates fare collection equipment and attendant labor requirements (e.g., operations and maintenance)
From page 56...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-7 Note: Impacts noted in this chart may vary by type of fare-free transit. For example, a partially fare-free transit system may not completely eliminate farebox equipment, which would not allow the transit agency to benefit from reduced operating and maintenance costs associated with fare collection equipment.
From page 57...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-8  Partial fare-free transit that is focused in areas and on modes that are most used by low-income, minority, and youth riders allows transit agencies to maintain a source of fare revenue, particularly from higher-earning riders.  Existing transit subsidies, such as employer passes, often provide de facto fare-free transit to certain riders, many of whom are higher-income.
From page 58...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-9 Operational Efficiency Fare-free transit may produce operational benefits, such as increased productivity and reduced dwell times. More specific survey and interview findings related to operations benefits of fare-free transit include:  Because fare-free transit almost always increases ridership it also typically leads to increased productivity, in terms of boardings per revenue hour.
From page 59...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-10 LINK Transit's Small Transit Intensive Cities Funding Implications Link Transit found in their fare-free transit evaluation that the anticipated ridership increase was expected to qualify the transit agency for approximately $275,000 in additional funding from the Small Transit Intensive Cities (STIC) funding program.
From page 60...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-11  Fare-free transit often results in lower operating costs and increased ridership, which reduces a transit agency's costs per passenger trip.  Fare-free transit expands funding opportunities that could become more reliable than fare revenue, including grants specific to fare-free transit, grants for increasing operating efficiency, and community funding partnerships.
From page 61...
... Fare-Free Transit Evaluation Framework 3-12 Community Impacts Fare-free transit has benefits for more than just transit agencies and their riders. These external benefits can range from short-term congestion reduction to long-term economic development and civic pride.

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