Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:

3 Exploring How Public Health, Nature, and Their Interconnections Are Valued
Pages 11-22

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 11...
... (Hassell)  A portfolio of indicators that link data streams on public health and environmental change would enable policy makers to connect action plans for public health with action plans for sustainable resource management and conservation and measure progress toward meeting policy goals.
From page 12...
... These human-caused changes are also affecting human health via cardiovascular changes, respiratory changes, mental health issues, heat strokes, increasing antimicrobial resistance, and increasing exposure to vector-borne diseases. Quoting a 2019 report from the Lancet Countdown project, Potter said, "The life of every child born today would be profoundly affected by climate change and other planetary health issues, with populations around the world increasingly facing extremes of weather, food, and water insecurity, changing patterns of infectious disease and a less certain future.
From page 13...
... INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGES TO FOSTER RESILIENCE Presented by Ann Marie Chischilly, Northern Arizona University Chischilly pointed out that there are 574 federally recognized Native American and Alaska Native tribes in the United States. In addition, approximately 100 tribes are recognized at the state level,
From page 14...
... . She also listed eight guidelines for engaging Indigenous Peoples in research projects that will involve using ITEKs, noting in particular the importance of involving tribal leadership instead of engaging only with specific community member(s)
From page 15...
... partnered with Hassell and his collaborators to evaluate the effects of environmental stewardship on public health and implications for valuing and evaluating the co-benefits of sustainable natural resource management and public health. This was part of WWF's work on developing its new Africa strategy to examine the public health effects of its applied work in six areas: providing nature-positive finance, greening development, promoting sustainably managed landscapes, improving climate change adaptation and mitigation, protecting critical biodiversity areas, and engaging communities.
From page 16...
... Decision-supporting tools might include those that can project public health outcomes into future environments, which would enable natural resource managers and public health professionals to test interventions and explore some of the economic tradeoffs between sustainable development activities and health. On a broader scale, Hassell pointed out, a portfolio of indicators that link the data from public health and from environmental change would enable policy makers to connect action plans for public health with action plans for sustainable resource management and conservation.
From page 17...
... Resilience is in demand, she said, because of multiple global crises -- the biodiversity crisis, the climate crisis, the social justice crisis, the crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic and underlying drivers of health burdens that remain unaddressed, and the crisis arising from authoritarian challenges to democracy -- that are intertwined and connected to humanity's relationship with nature. In that regard, she noted that the alternative values and ways of relating to nature that Chischilly discussed regarding Indigenous knowledge, promoted through respect and reciprocity among the research community, could shift the paradigm so humanity could live in greater harmony and oneness with the natural world.
From page 18...
... The first is that, for the past 15 years, the climate and health community has emphasized the health benefits arising from climate mitigation, such as health benefits from reducing air pollution through reducing fossil fuel emissions, and the economic value from improving human health exceeds the cost of the mitigation measures. This example and others point to the important benefits for human health and the profound implications for health equity that can result from broader climate actions.
From page 19...
... In another example where a wildlife migration corridor is built over the highway, a key consideration through the ecosystems health lens is how to design the migration corridors such that expanding human land use will not impair natural adaptation to climate change. Research may also be needed to compare the overall health impacts between having the highway with migration corridors as mitigation measures compared with the original ecosystem.
From page 20...
... Hassell acknowledged that it is challenging to integrate human behaviors into models, but there are examples of bottom-up modeling for emerging infectious diseases where risk is determined through ecological factors interacting with human behavior and environmental change. Such models provide the opportunity to integrate a fine-scale understanding of people's relationships with the environment in a way that leads to a better understanding of risk and that is not captured by top-down approaches to modeling risk at a broader scale.
From page 21...
... Hassell compared the current social sentiment and research practices regarding public health and environmental change to where the biodiversity conservation field was 10 to 20 years ago in linking biodiversity to environmental change. In his view, there are important lessons in how the biodiversity conservation community came together to set data standards and collect critical data that link biodiversity changes to drivers of environmental change.


This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.