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Currently Skimming:

5 Exploring Challenges, Gaps, and Opportunities for Moving from Knowledge to Action
Pages 27-38

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From page 27...
... (Webb)  Indigenous cultural practices are the basis of common interventions for risk prevention and health promotion across a variety of health outcomes.
From page 28...
... In addition, said Dirzo, "We tend to neglect the fact that the human enterprise is driven by our insatiable emphasis on growth [and] that the collective action of our cultural silos and lack of integration foments the threat to our life supporting systems, and leads to a terrible social inequity whereby the sectors of society that contribute the least to the manifestations of the Anthropocene are the most impacted by global change." Sleeman added that the diseases the National Wildlife Health Center studies are increasingly affecting human health, livestock health, agricultural economies, and environmental integrity.
From page 29...
... Fernandez explained that Indigenous cultural practices such as dancing, storytelling, as well as activism or practices that involve human interconnectedness within nature -- gathering wild rice or fishing, for example -- are the basis for common interventions for risk prevention and health promotion across a variety of health outcomes. Understanding the trauma Indigenous Peoples experience requires understanding how separation from the land has negative effects on health, said Fernandez.
From page 30...
... Examples include the Trail of Tears or militarized boarding schools designed to "kill the Indian and save the man." In addition to the historical traumas that involved sustained and multigenerational cultural and psychological annihilation, Indigenous Peoples continue to face attempts at environmental dispossession today. One well-known example is the battle that the Standing Rock water protectors continues to fight to protect their access to clean drinking water from the Dakota Access Pipeline.3 Fernandez presented an Indigenous theoretical framework showing how relationships with trauma and resilience can occur simultaneously and how to prevent negative health outcomes (Figure 51)
From page 31...
... Her research, she added, centers Indigenous traditional health knowledges in partnership with mainstream theories and methodologies that are culturally congruent. Her current work looks at how the relationship among place, culture, and nature might affect sleep health and chronic disease.
From page 32...
... An important question, said Luby, is how Nipah virus gets into humans, and epidemiologic studies identified an association between human Nipah infection and drinking fresh date palm sap. Anthropologists on his team determined that from late November through March, local populations in Bangladesh collect sap from date palms and sell it fresh as a local delicacy or use it to make molasses.
From page 33...
... Dirzo asked Fernandez to elaborate on the concept of traditional health knowledge. Fernandez responded by saying that traditional ecological knowledge, traditional health knowledge, and cultural practices that involve human interconnectedness with nature are all terms in English.
From page 34...
... In the environmental community, it is easy to focus on human impacts, but the alternative non-reductionist framing views people and nature as inseparable parts of a system that includes negative effects as well as human stewardship of natural systems and how nature sustains and fulfills human life. "If we focus on those reciprocal relationships and we make clear those intimate connections between people and healthy functioning ecosystems and healthy functioning communities, economies, and countries, then it becomes increasingly clear that caring for ecosystems is caring for ourselves," said Guerry.
From page 35...
... As for a common agenda, she said there is a need to align global health and global environmental policies. Currently, global environmental policies are segregated from the global health agenda.
From page 36...
... She suggested building that longer-term engagement into project budgets to ensure communities sufficiently benefit from the knowledge generated. Willetts commented that in her experience working in community health centers and community medicine, patients talk about home remedies, alternative remedies, and even ecological remedies that communities and families of different backgrounds use, but there is no way for Western medicine to respond and support traditional medicine.
From page 37...
... Luby called for having the courage to confront the exploitative, destructive linear economy and believing in the ability to realize a better future. Willetts said that evidence is not enough.


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