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6 Addressing Knowledge Gaps Through New and Emerging Cross-Cutting Research
Pages 39-46

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From page 39...
...  UNICEF has noted that climate change is one of the most intersectional challenges in history, with its causes and effects embedded deeply in the wider systems that shape economic and social inequality. (Van Hoorn)
From page 40...
... "This approach might seem more aligned to the complexity of planetary health and other complex systems with which people interrelate," said Redvers. Redvers explained that the Indigenous scientific method is contextual, holistic, symbolic, nonlinear, and relational; is not limited by time; and uses the collective observation of its people to explain natural phenomenon through real and metaphoric narratives.
From page 41...
... THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON CHILDREN Presented by Judith Van Hoorn, University of the Pacific Young children are the humans who are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, yet they have received less attention than adolescents and adults, said Van Hoorn. In fact, the World Health Organization has estimated that children under age six and their mothers will experience more than 80 percent of the effects of climate change on physical health (Xu et al., 2012)
From page 42...
... "I do not think we fully understand how this affects young people," said Hickman. "When we use the Western medical model to frame this distress, we are missing something absolutely crucially important." Showing a picture of a small rodent that went extinct because of climate change, Hickman cautioned that while the extinction of this rodent may not have any effect on the human population and health, this complacency could begin to be extrapolated to other animal species such as giraffes and polar bears, or even to entire countries and regions.
From page 43...
... Perhaps instead of eco-anxiety, this should be called climate horror or climate devastation, she said. These conditions may require a new framework for understanding climate change–related distress that connects empathically with the urgent issues people are facing.
From page 44...
... She also noted that children learn about climate change separately from the ordinary, everyday part of their lives; instead, climate change needs to be taught as part of their everyday lives. Liz Willetts, from the International Institute for Sustainable Development, asked if presenters could speak to how the medical system views biodiversity and its effects on human health, and whether
From page 45...
... She noted that the United Kingdom has been progressive in this regard, with efforts underway in Germany, Australia, Canada, and the United States to increase the integration of either climate change and human health or planetary health as it pertains to human health in coursework, and some countries include questions relevant to climate change and health in physician board exams. The challenge, said Redvers, is to include discussions about biodiversity loss and some of the more holistic elements of social justice as part of this integration.


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