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3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body
Pages 21-30

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From page 21...
... ( Ford) • Community health workers in Native American tribes help patients navigate their dental health needs and triage between concerns needing urgent treatment and those that could poten tially wait to be addressed until the following year.
From page 22...
... LIVED EXPERIENCES AND VISIONS FOR IMPROVED MODELS OF CARE The second half of the workshop began with an introduction from the session moderator, Anita Glicken of the National Interprofessional Initiative on Oral Health. The session featured several community health workers and individuals with meaningful lived experiences in the realm of oral health.
From page 23...
... Tribes are allocated very limited funds to spend on dental care, and once that money is gone there are no additional funds for dental insurance to cover the costs of addi­tional care. Thornton explained that community health workers in these communities help patients navigate their dental health needs and triage between issues needing urgent treatment and those that could potentially wait to
From page 24...
... In describing each of these scenarios, Thornton spoke of the role of community health workers in helping patients navigate complex and confusing circumstances and in assisting some of the most marginalized patients in receiving the oral health care that they need. The next speaker was Md Koushik Ahmed, who spoke about dental health care in rural Bangladesh.
From page 25...
... Thornton recounted a story of a child with extreme dental fear who overcame this fear after working with Thornton's team and receiving the gift of a new toothbrush. Brown added that community health workers and care providers could go into schools, churches, nonprofit organizations, and other community hubs to offer dental screenings and education services.
From page 26...
... He emphasized the importance of collaboration across fields, saying that professionals such as social workers, psychiatrists, doctors, and community health workers could be more involved in promoting and supporting oral health. On this point, many panelists added their thoughts.
From page 27...
... " Perhaps, he suggested, admissions processes might be altered to shift the focus of oral health toward community health and prevention, given that a gap exists between dental education practices and community needs. To help close that gap, Glick said, oral health promotion could benefit from a celebrity spokesperson who could help normalize a preventionbased approach to oral health.
From page 28...
... Further expanding the conversation, Berman and Fisher turned to two presenters from outside the United States, who described lessons learned from incorporating oral health promotion and prevention into non-dental health clinics. First to speak was Matanhire, a public health dentist in Zimbabwe who shared her experiences with integrating oral health into mental health, community-based programs in Zimbabwe.
From page 29...
... Their results showed 10 percent caries in their population versus 60 percent in controls and demonstrated cost savings through oral health promotion in very young children. Villena reiterated a point that had been mentioned throughout the workshop, saying "it is always better and easier to establish a good habit earlier in life than to try to change a bad one." Keeping to the theme of community-engagement and value proposition, Fisher asked Albino to share her thoughts on the importance of integrating health care teams in addressing the social determinants of health while focus­ing on the unique social needs of individual communities.
From page 30...
... In this way, the existing health care workforce would become competent in and role models for interprofessional collaborative care, teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and interprofessional communication. He suggested modeling this work after successful programs in other countries, where oral health has been successfully integrated into overall health care, and extending the education to practitioners outside of the traditional health care framework to include all professionals who may have a meaningful impact on the health of individuals and communities.


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