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2 Learning from Interprofessional Oral Health Models of Education
Pages 5-20

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From page 5...
... (McNeilly) • Dental hygienists could spend more time working in commu nity settings to deliver preventive oral health care services to populations that are often left out of the current dental health care delivery model.
From page 6...
... Discussants spoke about a collaborative approach to oral health care models, how to make health education more integrative, and how to prepare professionals, conceptually and in practice, to integrate oral health into overall health. INTEGRATING ORAL HEALTH INTO OVERALL HEALTH In his presentation on the importance of integrating oral health into overall health, Mays also spoke about current issues in oral health education and practice as well as the importance of visual storytelling in health care.
From page 7...
... * HPSAs (health professional shortage areas)
From page 8...
... While Mays noted that Medicaid expansion and the Children's Health Insurance Program have provided major improvements in oral health care access for low-income children, he said there is a need for continued improvement in these programs, especially with how they reimburse providers for dental exams. Mays described the findings of a pilot study involving patients within a University of Minnesota dental clinic that examined those social determinants of health that affect access to oral health promotion, prevention, and care, noting that unemployment stood out as a major driver of unmet need (see Figure 2-2)
From page 9...
... FIGURE 2-2  How specific social determinants of health affect access to oral health care, based on a survey of 175 participants at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. SOURCE: Presented by Keith Mays, November 3, 2022.
From page 10...
... This model of care was extremely successful, he said, and it ­illustrates the potential of a holistic and prevention-focused approach, which hopefully will be followed by other systems of care in the future. THE ORAL HEALTH ROLES OF DIFFERENT HEALTH PROFESSIONS: A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION Robert Weyant with the University of Pittsburgh School of Dentistry introduced a conversation centered around the critical question of how oral health can be more fully integrated into overall health, both conceptually and operationally.
From page 11...
... Later speakers, including Daniel McNeil from the University of Florida, Colleen Lampron with AFL Enterprises, LLC, and Michael Glick from the Center for Integrative Oral Health at the University of Pennsylvania, discussed topics including policy barriers and reinforcing the importance of oral health educators and leaders being actively involved in policy development and advocacy. For example, Weyant said that research shows cost to be the biggest barrier to routine dental care in the United States and that the way dental care is financed can be addressed through policy change.
From page 12...
... Next, Weyant facilitated a discussion with a panel of health professionals and educators representing medicine, public health, nutrition/ dietetics, nursing, and psychology about the oral health roles of different health professions and how they can work across disciplines to promote oral health. Weyant began the conversation by highlighting the severity of the lack of oral health promotion and prevention in some communities in the United States.
From page 13...
... Finally, Ziegler urged increased collaboration between medical and dental schools and among all health professionals. Integrating Oral and Overall Health Weyant posed a question about the role of nursing in oral health to Haber, who spoke about her work integrating oral health and overall health while leading the national Oral Health Nursing Education Practice program (AAN, 2021)
From page 14...
... Silk closed by assuring attendees that the tools to accomplish care integration already exist, but commitments to change are needed across states, towns, and institutions. The Role of Social Workers in Oral Health Education Weyant then spoke with Hemmings, a social worker, about the role of social workers in oral health and in the education of health professionals.
From page 15...
... Psychology can be used in addressing mental health issues involved in oral health, such as dental fear and anxiety, he said, and there are numerous applications for psychology in interprofessional oral health care and education, including training on communication and interaction skills, understanding inequities, respectful and effective patient communication, and skills for interacting with public health, public policy, and other professionals that affect the quality of oral health care. McNeil mentioned that he is currently working on a project training oral health providers to use psychological tools to work with young children and their caregivers.
From page 16...
... Critical to this reimagining is addressing barriers in access to care and redesigning the oral health care model to focus on prevention; Lampron suggested that public health professionals could work with policy makers to ensure the financing and coverage of evidence-based services. For example, there has been some evidence to suggest that telehealth positively affects oral health, and Lampron said that coverage of telehealth for oral health care could play a large role in removing barriers to care access for those who struggle to get to the dentist.
From page 17...
... FIGURE 2-3  A visual depiction of an interconnected health care system designed for oral health equity. SOURCE: Presented by Colleen Lampron, November 3, 2022.
From page 18...
... She also suggested that it would likely be beneficial if faculty in health care programs received integrative and collaborative continuing professional education, and she said it would be valuable to integrate oral health metrics into primary health care standards, as this would require primary care doctors to take notice of oral health. Continuing the discussion, Hemmings added that addressing the social determinants of health will be key to overcoming barriers and that special attention should be given to retraining dentists who have been in the field for decades but have not received training on a holistic perspective to oral health.
From page 19...
... This early integration is beneficial and important to their future ability to work collaboratively and could help enable future health care practices that are more fully integrated between oral health and medical care. Willgerodt relayed a participant comment suggesting that if state regulations allowed trainees from one health profession to be supervised by providers from other health professions, it would be valuable to offer interprofessional education in which dental hygienists and dental therapists were educated together with other health care professions in hospitals and community centers.


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