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Future of the Nation's Laboratory Systems for Health Emergency Response: Proceedings of a Workshop - in Brief
Pages 1-14

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From page 1...
... The views summarized here reflect public health emergencies and to discuss the future the knowledge and opinions of individual workshop of laboratory capabilities, capacities, and coordination participants and should not be construed as consensus for public health emergencies response across public or recommendations among workshop participants or and private entities nationally. During the first day of the members of the Forum on Medical and Public Health the workshop, panelists examined the performance of Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies, Forum on current laboratory systems for public health emergency Microbial Threats, or the National Academies.
From page 2...
... , the Laboratory Response Network (LRN) , the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN)
From page 3...
... state. cited numerous examples of surveillance networks, including the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus In providing a broader perspective regarding PHLs, Surveillance System,9 CaliciNet, FoodNet,10 the Animal Becker explained that they are part of a complex system Contract Outbreak Surveillance System,11 and the composed of state and local governmental laboratories National Wastewater Surveillance System,12 and noted that provide laboratory services for their population.
From page 4...
... the senior scientific director and head of research and Facilitators to Public Health Emergency Preparedness and development of infectious disease and immunology at Response Quest Diagnostic Infectious Disease, further elaborated Christina Egan, the deputy director of the Division of on the role that national reference laboratories play in Infectious Diseases and chief of biodefense and mycology the NLS by describing how they can serve as a resource laboratories at the Wadsworth Center at the New York and partner during public health emergency response State Department of Health, noted that in its response because of their national footprint and infrastructure. to previous incidents, such as the 2001 Anthrax events, But partnerships, roles, and responsibilities need to the federal government made funding available to be discussed in advance and early on in the process if PHLs to enhance capabilities and capacities in various they are to be effective and to reduce the initial chaos forms, ranging from trained personnel to supplies of responding to an emergency.
From page 5...
... 17 during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as allowing Barriers to Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response remote review of pathology slides and data, the use of Existing gaps in laboratory capabilities, capacities, and alternate collection devices and expired reagents, and resources that could negatively affect response activities expedited review of CLIA applications, aided response also surfaced throughout workshop discussions. During 14 https://asm.org (accessed June 5, 2023)
From page 6...
... "data to information" by Fleisher. Public entities are also affected by financial obstacles, Van Meter's sentiments on the issue of the defined as King pointed, mentioning specifically the absence minimum data set and the need for interoperability were of a "coordinated and funded emergency response clear in her comment that this is "like the Holy Grail network for governmental laboratories involved in we've all been chasing for a long time." She explained environmental testing." She explained that the "EPA further by saying that reporting requirements in general eRLN [Environmental Response Laboratory Network]
From page 7...
... Salerno offered a conceptual framework ICLN is "a little bit resource constrained," as he is the for evaluating laboratory system response in which single federal staff member. Van Meter highlighted the various entities, ranging from federal agencies through pervasiveness of the workforce issue with, "You can't academia, are assessed in the phases of surveillance, talk about clinical laboratories these days without noting the initial response, the initial surge response, the the workforce challenges that we are all facing," she expanded surge response, and recovery.
From page 8...
... advance more open and interoperable public health Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, data. and Colleen Kraft, a professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of the Division of Sam Scarpino, the director of artificial intelligence Infectious Diseases, an associate medical officer at Emory (AI)
From page 9...
... test manufacturers, physician associations, patient associations, and educational institutions; by contrast, Aspinall further elaborated on the benefits of Binnicker offered a more targeted approach in which four partnerships but stressed the need to communicate to five strategic diagnostic test manufactures that could frequently and educate partners regarding the serve as a "go-to" for novel emerging infectious diseases strengths and weaknesses of testing. She spoke about are approached during "peacetime" and cited the Prepare the importance of educating providers on the power for and Response to Existing Viruses, Emerging New of diagnostics based on her experiences during the Threats (PREVENT)
From page 10...
... Gronvall said that many of these recommendations One of Gronvall's primary proposals for improvements are complemented by the National Academies study in this response phase was to create a "permanent, Ensuring an Effective Public Health Emergency Medical private–public testing coordination body." She explained Countermeasures Enterprise.27 that such an advisory body would involve stakeholders 27 https://nap.nationalacademies.org/catalog/26373/ensuring-an effective-public-health-emergency-medical-countermeasuresand serve as a transparent conduit of preparedness enterprise (accessed June 5, 2023)
From page 11...
... She reflected on Becker's In the concluding roundtable panel discussion, description of the NLS as a "system of systems" and said participants reflected on the entirety of the workshop that while the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders discussions to articulate the elements, stakeholders, had been discussed, two important concepts were and functions of an ideal NLS structure that would be missing: (1) the dynamic interactions between these prepared to respond to future public health threats and systems, which she described as "definitely not static," emergencies.
From page 12...
... He suggested a similar tactic to enhance the agnostic testing, the identification and mitigation of scalability of assays by building in the interoperability potential obstacles that could limit necessary surge and of reagents among commercial kits across scalable scale-up capabilities, a digital means of integrated data automated platforms during development. Genzen sharing, and "biosafety and biosecurity by design." recommended that processes be simplified and that Kubin reinforced the significance of these attributes in regulatory requirements be "right-sized" to simplify her comments about the need for accurate data to guide the management of surge capacity and paperwork, investigations and make informed, sound public health respectively, and he concluded with the concept of decisions.
From page 13...
... REFERENCES Grabenstein, J
From page 14...
... George, Bipartisan Commission on Biodefense; Joanne Andreadis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Benjamin Chan, New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services; Lee Fleisher, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Kenra Ford; New York City Health + Hospitals; Jeannette Guarner, Emory University School of Medicine, Joneigh Khaldun, CVS Health; William Meyer, Quest Diagnostics; Andrew Scott, Department of Homeland Security; Jill Taylor, Association of Public Health Laboratories; Brannon Traxler, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, and Susan Van Meter, American Clinical Laboratory Association. REVIEWERS To ensure that it meets institutional standards for quality and objectivity, this Proceedings of a Workshop -- in Brief was reviewed by Joneigh S


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