Skip to main content

Currently Skimming:

Appendix E: Data Extraction Tables
Pages 243-452

The Chapter Skim interface presents what we've algorithmically identified as the most significant single chunk of text within every page in the chapter.
Select key terms on the right to highlight them within pages of the chapter.


From page 243...
... Appendix E Data Extraction Tables This appendix contains the following: • E-1: General Study and Population Characteristics -- Data Extrac tion Table • E-2: Intervention Description -- Data Extraction Table • E-3: Outcomes -- Data Extraction Table 243
From page 244...
... (2022) RCT grative lifestyle English- recruited from Education level: NR End: 241 End: 239 pattern analysis speaking first- first-time par- 20% completed Eligible: 630 Follow-up: Follow-up: 165 approach, the time parents ent groups and high school main carers 172 objective was participating assessed by the Race: NR (62 first-time Baseline used for to assess the in "first- nurse Ethnicity: NR parent groups)
From page 245...
... (2014) RCT maternal feed- End: 241 End: 239 ing knowledge, Follow-up: Follow-up: NR feeding practic- NR es, self-efficacy, and dietary intakes acted as mediators of the effect of the INFANT intervention to improve child diet quality continued 245
From page 246...
... (2013) RCT effect of the IN- End: NR End: NR FANT program Follow-up: Follow-up: NR on young chil- NR dren's dietary patterns INFANT Campbell Cluster Assess the Baseline: 271 Baseline: 271 [Australia]
From page 247...
... fects of wean- Healthy cians par- Education level: 425 End: 177 End: 181 (2022) ing (i.e., the infants, stable ticipated and 31% (control)
From page 248...
... et al. tive of antenatal pre-pregnancy ing maternal Education level: 2,286 1,139 End: 995 (2021)
From page 249...
... (7,985 parents) 1,008 14 mo: 821 BMI, health youth health home visit of and 46% (inter- were invited 6 mo: 687 36 mon: 766 behavior, and care organiza- youth health vention)
From page 250...
... had less Completed: urban site maternal infant ish speaking, study sites than high school 412 was in this feeding practic- singleton Interested education group es, knowledge, uncomplicated women were Race: NR and styles at 10 pregnancy, informed about Ethnicity: 100% mo in low-in- intended to the study, Hispanic come Hispanic receive consented, and Language spo families pediatric care randomized ken: English and at the study at 32 wks of Spanish(percentage sites gestation not specified) Women with Maternal age: diabetes, 29 yrs (both depression, or intervention and intrauterine control groups)
From page 251...
... Eligible: not and nutri- Mother's vertisements: Education level: reported tional training self-reported the first for 16 average yrs of Enrolled: 128 for first-time history of group train- education dyads mothers can present/past ing for moth- Race: NR Completed: improve feed- mental illness ers of infants Ethnicity: 85% of NR ing interaction (e.g., schizo- aged 4–6 mo mothers born in at age 12 mo phrenia, eat- (intervention) Israel ing disorders)
From page 252...
... (2019) weight or Healthy diatricians Education level: all pe- newborns; 11 newborns; 11 obesity full-term registered in NR [professional diatricians in pediatricians pediatricians occurring at 2 newborns the district category was 4- Veneto region 1st yr well 1st yr well yrs of life; im- whose parents interested scale of 1–9]
From page 253...
... H/Lat. not reported Language: % speaking English, % Spanish not reported Maternal age: 29.4 years (mean)
From page 254...
... Successfully 18 months are overweight tion AU. Each NR completed: or obese on participant Ethnicity: 2.9% 1,602 parents child outcomes Exclusion: provided writ- Asian, 2.6% and infants at age 18 mo Women with ten informed Other, 3.8% eligible for Type I or II consent, and Indian follow-up and diabetes diag- the ethics Language: % completed nosed before committee at speaking English, consent pregnancy each collabo- % Spanish NR rating hospital Maternal age: 30 approved the yrs (mean)
From page 255...
... and were clinics Education level: Completed 9 mo follow- 9 mo follow foster behav- Medicaid 51% high school run-in period up: 34 up: 37 iors promoting insured; >18 graduates and were ran healthy infant yrs old and Race: 88% Black domized: 87 growth and English speak- Ethnicity: 2% Completed: 85 preventing ing; singleton Latina, 7% Asian obesity pregnancy or American between 20–32 Indian wks at the Language spo time of enroll- ken: NR ment, owned Maternal age: a smartphone 27 yrs with a data plan Exclusion: Women with a major mental illness (e.g., schizophre nia) or other severe mor bidity (e.g., renal failure)
From page 256...
... et al. center RCT dietary intake healthy term borns/care- Education level: 58% 4,376 End: NR End: NR (2016)
From page 257...
... Exclusion: Clinical range score on the Kessler 10 Psychological Distress Scale (K10) below 30; if the infant has any diagnosed congenital abnormality or chronic condition likely to influence normal development (including feeding behavior)
From page 258...
... (2015) center RCT term outcomes stratified by of intervention clinic effects on ma ternal feeding practices and child anthropo metric indica tors of obesity risk across 4 outcome assessment points (14 months and 2, 3.5, and 5 years of age)
From page 259...
... (2014) center RCT parent-report stratified by ed child eating clinic behavior and maternal par enting impact outcomes of an infant feeding intervention to reduce child obesity risk Daniels et Multi- Evaluate al.
From page 260...
... (2012) center RCT universal stratified by obesity preven clinic tion interven tion, which commenced at infant age 4–6 mo, using outcome data assessed 6 mo after comple tion of the first of two inter vention mod ules and 9 mo from baseline
From page 261...
... or Language spoken: at improving nutritional care intervention NR child feed- and discharged (n = 2) ; two Maternal age: NR ing practices home within 5 urban sites and growth days after birth and 2 subur- Intervention group patterns and ban sites; one had higher number ultimately Exclusion: NR of the urban of African American reducing risk sites was low caregivers, higher for overweight income unemployment rate, and obesity lower household in later in life come, lower completed education level, and less home ownership than the control group continued 261
From page 262...
... NR NR End: NR End: NR Kingdom, domized, ing parents to ment; sufficient- ter of preg- Education level: Eligible: NR Follow-up: Follow-up: Greece, parallel introduce a va- ly proficient in nancy and (% < high school) Enrolled: 146 71 68 Portugal]
From page 263...
... infant feeding wks, chronic staff obtained 23/23 yrs (mean) Baseline: behaviors at 1 disease, foster written 101 partici yr compared placement, or informed pants with routine known genetic consent and End: 61 advice as out- disorder described Follow-up: lined in Bright the study in NR Futures (BF)
From page 264...
... (2011) randomized feasibility of er–infant pairs mailed a Education level (col- (pre-eligible)
From page 265...
... of old infants SES: NR Eligible: NR End: NR Follow-up (2 educational age who were attending Education level: Enrolled: 251 Follow-up (2 years) : 99 intervention attending a routine health 86%/89% college Completed: NR years)
From page 266...
... TABLE E-1 Continued 266 Number of Author Individuals Ap- Number of Number of Last Inclusion and proached and Participants Participants Trial Name Name, Study Study Objec- Exclusion Population Charac- Completed the in Interven- in Compara[Country] Year Design tive Criteria Recruitment teristics Intervention tion Group tor Group Exclusion: Chil- community- Hispanic dren with birth based, Language spoken: weights of 2 kg pediatric NR or less, a chron- group prac- Maternal age: NR ic illness other tice located than asthma, in Toronto, had previ- Canada.
From page 267...
... educational Exclusion: ed of parents SES: (reported mean Eligible: NR End: NR End: NR kiosk that uses Parents of 4-mo- of children or median) NR Enrolled: 101 Follow-up: Follow-up: interactive, old infants who receiving Education level: parents NR NR self-guided, had previously healthy well- (83%/79% high Successfully computerized completed the child visits school diploma)
From page 268...
... of an educa- yrs of age, ticipating day University education sample: 581 and 103 78 parents tional program other factors not care centers Race: NR children parents End: 74 on healthy reported were invited Ethnicity: NR Eligible: 206 End: 75 children and alimentation, to informa- Language spoken: children and children 72 parents carried out Exclusion: tion meet- NR (but primarily 195 parents and 67 Follow-up: in day-care Children still ings with Spanish) Enrolled: 149 parents NR centers and exclusively pamphlets Maternal age: 35 yrs children and Follow-up: aimed at the breastfeeding and posters.
From page 269...
... design flavor–flavor attended nurs- children Race: NR Eligible: NR End: 29 learning as a ery for at least 2 aged 12‒60 Ethnicity: NR Enrolled: 4 1 month strategy for days per wk mo through Language spoken: Successfully follow up: increasing veg- local day care NR completed: 3 28 etable intake Exclusion: NR nurseries Maternal age: NR 6 month in preschool via email or follow up: children. telephone, 10 and managers were given study instruc tions.
From page 270...
... 1-yr family- aged 9–24 mo chosen and SES: 17% low SES sample: 404 End: 126 children based healthy in child care measured Education level: NR children, 137 children Follow-up: lifestyle in- centers located ordinally by Race: NR day cares Follow-up: 56 children tervention in low-SES and SES status Ethnicity: NR Eligible: NR 100 children implemented medium-SES resulting in Language: NR Enrolled: 203 through day- communities recruiting Maternal age: NR children, 70 care centers 2 child care day care cen on toddlers' Exclusion: Chil- centers per ters BMI z-scores dren classified SES status Successfully and reported as underweight Parents were completed: activity and or obese using invited to 191 children dietary-related BMI z-scores enroll their (included in behaviors child into the analyses) study with Follow-up (12 completed months)
From page 271...
... viders' infant Exclusion: NR cards to child SES: NR Eligible: NR were lost were lost feeding knowl- care centers Education level: NR Enrolled: 48 between between edge, attitude, with consent Race: 4%/13% Black; (child care the I and the I and C and behavior for each 83%/74% White providers) C groups groups (does changes after phase of the Ethnicity: 4%/0% Successfully (does not not specify viewing the intervention Asian, 9%/13% completed: 38 specify how how many infant feed- Instructions Hispanic/Latino, many from from each ing website.
From page 272...
... toddlers be- Start staff Ethnicity: NR parent–toddler tween the ages Language spoken: feeding prac- of 11 and 25 mo NR tices at the time of Maternal age: mean intake into the age 26 yrs study Exclusion: Caregivers with toddlers who already had diagnosed eating problem and non-English speaking fami lies
From page 273...
... RCT -- pilot of weekly SMS to participate, (2018) for improving unwillingness to infant feeding be randomized, practices and and not being infant weight able to read 273 continued
From page 274...
... (84%) increase mater- infant <5 mo old program in Education level: 50% Enrolled: 439 Combined Combined nal knowledge enrolled in WIC; NYC < high school Completed: 339 6-mo 6-mo follow of appropriate and agreeing to Race: NR Kept in analy- follow-up: up: 339 infant feeding be contacted by Women in the Ethnicity: 100% sis: 272 339 (77%)
From page 275...
... Hispanic sive parenting nancy, English from the Language spoken: intervention speaking, lived mother/in- NR designed to within ≤75 miles fant nursery Maternal age: Inter prevent rapid of Augusta, at Augusta vention: 24 years; infant weight GA, and had an Univer- Control: 22 years gain on Afri- infant ≥2,500 g sity Medical can American at birth Center mothers' infant feeding prac tices continued 275
From page 276...
... TABLE E-1 Continued 276 Number of Author Individuals Ap- Number of Number of Last Inclusion and proached and Participants Participants Trial Name Name, Study Study Objec- Exclusion Population Charac- Completed the in Interven- in Compara[Country] Year Design tive Criteria Recruitment teristics Intervention tion Group tor Group Exclusion: Known medi cal condition that could affect postnatal care (e.g., major mental illness, substance use disorder)
From page 277...
... responsive mothers with SES: income of Randomized: End (com- pleted parenting healthy, term, $50,000 or more: 291 pleted 1-year visit) : intervention on singleton new- 90%/75% Completed: 279 1-year 125 mother-report- borns; English- Education level: (completed 3–4 visit)
From page 278...
... grad 75%/75%; 12 mon = 100 RP group siblings siblings; deter- 77%/77% Baseline: 57 of control mine whether Race: NR End: NR group a responsive Ethnicity: NR Baseline: 60 parenting (RP) Maternal age: 30/32; At 12 End: NR intervention 28/31 months: 48 modified birth- total for At 12 order effects both RP months: 52 on diet groups total for both control groups
From page 279...
... nual household in- Enrolled: 279 intervention comes above $75,000 Completed at designed for 50%/50% 52 weeks: 253 obesity pre- Education: col vention on lege and postgrad parents' infant 62%/63% feeding prac- Race: Black 7%/5% tices in the White 87%/91% first yr after Ethnicity: birth NH/PI 0.7%/0% Asian: 4%/3% Other: 1.4%/0.7% Hispanic/Latino 9%/5% Maternal age: 29/29 years continued 279
From page 280...
... : 125 affects infant Education: col- Final analy dietary pat- lege and postgrad Final analy- sis: 130 terns 66%/65% sis: 129 Race: Black 5.4%/4.6% White 89.2%/92.3% Ethnicity: NH/PI 0.8%/0% Asian 3.1%/3.1% Other 1.6%/0% Hispanic 7%/6% Maternal age 29/29 years
From page 281...
... Race: Non-Hispanic Randomized: intervention on 93% 291 infant weight White 88% Completed first gain between Ethnicity: NR visit: 279 birth and 28 Maternal age: NR Completed at wks and over- 52 weeks: 253 weight status at age 1 yr continued 281
From page 282...
... Second- were excluded. Special Me ary outcomes dia" were child anthro-pomet rics and ma ternal feeding practices
From page 283...
... on sugar- race/ethnicity, ic and WIC receiving SNAP or Completed: NR follow-up: follow-up: sweetened mother to an program as EBT, 45% receive Follow up at 12 66 63 beverage (SSB) infant <14 wks, well as word WIC, 2% receive months: 123 consumption, and residence of mouth TANF, 55% report responsive within 50 miles one or more finan parenting, and of the Northern cial hardships, 35% infant feeding Navajo Medical water insecure, 23% practices, and Center, located low or and very low optimal growth in Shiprock, food security through 12 mo New Mexico Education level: 50% postpartum completed education Exclusion: beyond high school Unable to fully Race/ethnicity: participate or 100% Navajo were unwill- Language spoken: ing to undergo NR randomization Maternal age: 27 yrs continued 283
From page 284...
... of livar, or Hum- health fairs; can 96%/97% the perinatal phreys County women were White 4%/3% educational in Mississippi also referred Ethnicity: NR curriculum on by clinic Language spoken: compliance Exclusion: NR staff, WIC NR with infant nutritionists, Maternal age: 24 yrs feeding recom- social ser mendations vices, and and changes other partici in maternal pants infant feeding knowledge and beliefs
From page 285...
... interactive, 18 yrs old, have ed through SES: all low-income Eligible: NR home visiting a child aged postings at (<200% of federal Enrolled: 104 curriculum tai- 13–16 mo with- day care cen- poverty line) , >80% Completed: NR lored to low- out significant ters, libraries, on WIC or LINK socioeconomic cognitive or health clinics, (not defined)
From page 286...
... Ethnicity: 60% His of the infant Center linked panic/Latino, 19% and residence to the NFN other, 2% unknown in a BFF Center home visiting Language spoken: neighborhood at program. BFF NR infant's birth centers were Maternal age: 23 yrs paired by SES Exclusion: In- and racial/ fants with major ethnic com position and were random ly assigned to conduct either the standard NFN home visiting
From page 287...
... : 88 food prefer- Hospital <34 hospital were 45%/53% university Eligible: 214 ences differ in wks gestation; invited to Race: NR Enrolled: 206 infants follow- speak English or participate Ethnicity: 79%/84% Completed: 166 ing baby-led Te Reo Māori; New Zealand Eu instead of plan to live in ropean, 14%/10% traditional the Dunedin, Maori or Pacific, spoon-feeding New Zealand, 7%/6% Asian approaches to Language spoken: introducing NR solids Maternal age: 31 yrs (both groups) continued 287
From page 288...
... older on food and nutrient intake Exclusion: Not at 7–24 mo of living locally, age mother ≤16 years, booked Taylor et 2-arm RCT Determine after 34 wks al.
From page 289...
... ; and /79% New are not planning Zealand to leave the European; all local area prior groups 8% Maori; to their child's 10%/12%/11% second birthday /11% other Language spoken: Exclusion: NR Babies born Maternal age: All before 36.5 wks, groups 32 yrs or if a congenital abnormality or a physical or intellectual dis ability likely to affect feeding, physical activ ity, or growth is identified continued 289
From page 290...
... (2013) tal design learning between 4 and recruited Education level: NR 123 line: NR NR mechanisms to 8 mo, introduc- by leaflets Race: NR Eligible: 100 End: 31 End: 32 increase veg- tion of comple- or posters Ethnicity: NR Enrolled: NR 2-wk 2-wk follow etable accep- mentary foods distributed in Language spoken: Completed: 95 follow-up: up, tance in infants was started health pro- NR 31 3-mo follow at complemen- at >2 wk and fessionals Maternal age: NR 3-mo up, tary feeding, <2 mo before consult- follow-up: 6-mo follow namely repeat- the start of the ing rooms, 30 up: all 32 ed exposure study, no health pharmacies, 6-mo (RE)
From page 291...
... (2011) effectiveness Women aged women were vention/control potential 337 End: NR of a home- ≥16, expect- approached SES: 23%/19% sample: 2,700 End: NR 6-mo follow based early ing their first by nurses unemployed women (as- 6-mo up: 283 intervention on child, between at antenatal Education level: sessed for follow-up: 12-mo fol infant feeding 24–34 wks of clinics of 54%/56% completed eligibility)
From page 292...
... : 155 trained vol- eral occupa- clinics lo- support/jobseeker's Enrolled: 312 133 12-mo unteers could tional classes cated in more allowance Completed: 212 12-mo follow-up: improve infant II-V (nonprofes- disadvan- Education level: follow-up: 124 feeding prac- sional) ; babies taged neigh- 39%/33% left full 115 18-mo tices at age 12 born ≥37 wks; borhoods time education (<16 18-mo follow-up: mo, a RCT was birth weight across Cam- years)
From page 293...
... marketing vid- Exclusion: NR pany re- WIC participants Eligible: 665 End: 302 eos address- cruited panel (low-income) Enrolled: 665 ing common members Education level: 27% Completed: 600 misperceptions from diverse high school or less about ingredi- online sourc- Race: 33% Black, ents and claims es through 46% White, 10% on children's ads on social Asian, 8% mixed or sugary drinks media and other special inter- Ethnicity: 26% est websites; Hispanic emails were Language spoken: sent to NR eligible panel Parental age: 69% members 18–34 yrs continued 293
From page 294...
... (2022) lel group exposure to ≥37 wk, of Education level: 90% 282 End: 56 End: 52 land]
From page 295...
... and its breastfed for less NR 19 follow-up: effectiveness than 3 mo with a Maternal age: 26 yrs 4- & 6-mo 19 on rates of previous child follow-up: breastfeeding 19 up to 6 mo Exclusion: postpartum, Pregnancies rates of early conceived using introduction fertility treat of solids, and ments, those infant feeding at high risk for progression pre-term deliv ery, those with multiple gesta tion (i.e., twins, triplets, etc.) , or pregnancies complicated by morbid obesity, diabetes, hyper tension, meta bolic dysfunc tion, etc.
From page 296...
... , had ticipants had were female with experienced at agreed to be 74% of all parents least 1 comple- recontacted, aged 30–49 yrs mentary food, and partici and did not pant refer have food aller- rals between gies or genetic September or metabolic 2018 and disorders that April 2019 could affect food intake Exclusion: NR
From page 297...
... (2021) preserving the Parents at least with infants control group NR mothers mothers taste of the 18 yrs old, in maternity SES: NR Eligible: 670 End: 25 End: 26 ingredients good German hospitals or Education level: Enrolled: 72 of commer- language skills; in postnatal 8/25 and 4/26 Successfully cially prepared infants were courses in mothers with sec- completed: 51 complementary healthy term, the Dort- ondary foods would 0 to 3 mo, no mund region, Race: NR increase the known allergies Germany.
From page 298...
... prevention in weighing >2,500 were recruit- Education level: infants based g at birth. ed from two 93%/71% 2 or 4-yr on breastfeed- obstetrics and college ing attitude, Exclusion: Moth- gynecology Race: NR self-efficacy, ers with twin clinics Ethnicity: NR and duration, infants, infants Language spoken: recognition of with congenital NR hunger and deformities (e.g., Maternal age: 32/31 satiety cues, cleft palate)
From page 299...
... (2020) process evalua tion of Food4tod dlers eHealth intervention targeting food environment, parental feed ing practices, and toddlers' diet and to ex amine possible differences in these areas according to education and family compo sition continued 299
From page 300...
... , >37 wks recruitment Maternal age: 32/32 and 15 mo old and >3 kg agency yrs (mean) would result in a higher Exclusion: Chil exposure to dren introduced textured foods to comple and a higher mentary foods food texture before 4 mo acceptance by or after 6 mo, their infant using the baby led weaning method, and those already involved in an other study on eating behavior
From page 301...
... Randomized: follow-up: follow-up: SMS support to communicate at antenatal Education level: 66% 1,155 293 312 in improving in English, had clinics with university Follow-up 12-mo infant feeding a mobile phone, a letter of Race: NR completed at 6 follow-up: practices and and lived in invitation Ethnicity: NR months: 947 286 tummy time the recruitment Language spoken: Follow up Baseline and reducing areas 54% English, 46% completed at 12 SMS: 384 screen time Other months: 920 6-mo Exclusion: NR Maternal age: 85% follow-up: above 25-39 years 338 12-mo follow-up: 322 continued 301
From page 302...
... vention on pa- in the study if Facebook Education level: Enrolled: 715 236–269 End T3: rental feeding they had a 3–5 advertising 83%/80% college/ Completed T2 End T3: 143–165 practices and mo old infant, and through university degree (child age 12 152–178 infant eating were literate in emailing Nor- Race: NR mo) : 455 behaviors Norwegian, and wegian mu- Ethnicity: NR Completed responsible for nicipalities Language spoken: T3 (child age Helle et RCT Evaluate the providing food child health 7%/8% not Nor- 24 mo, 1 yr of al.
From page 303...
... introduction ton infants, recruited by income between 20- Eligible: NR End: 111 of taste por- 4–6 mo of age letter 49.9 Euros Enrolled: 250 tions and a >37 wks and Education level: Completed: 232 novel protein- >2,500 g liv- 71%/67% university reduced ing in Umeå Race: NR complementary and remain in Ethnicity: (of diet based on the study area mother) 98%/95% Nordic foods and would not Sweden on fruit and commence child Language spoken: vegetable care outside the NR intake, growth home Maternal age: 31 yrs and iron status (both groups)
From page 304...
... (2014) different vege- be healthy, full recruited 16 yrs Enrolled: 60 Baseline: 29 Baseline: 31 table exposure term, had been from chil- Race: NR Completed: NR End: NR End: NR methods over a breast fed from dren's cen- Ethnicity: NR 9-day period in birth and had ters, play- Language spoken: two groups of been breastfed groups, and NR infants: those exclusively post-natal Maternal age: early introduced to until the age of groups introduction: 31 yrs; solids prior to introduction of later introduction: the age of 5.5 complementary 34 yrs mo, and those feeding introduced af ter 5.5 mo as is Exclusion: recommended Infants who had eaten peas, were not exclusively breast fed until complementary feeding, had been weaned earlier than anticipated or were being weaned directly onto finger foods (baby-led weaning)
From page 305...
... (2017) long-term recruited tion/Control NR End: NR End: NR effect on tod- Exclusion: NR through SES: NR Eligible: NR 15 mo: 44 15 mo: 27 dlers' fruit and health care Education level: Enrolled: 110 24 mo: 40 24 mo: 24 vegetable intake centers 89%/80% some col- Completed: NR and sweet lege or more beverages, and Race: NR skepticism for Ethnicity: NR new food, of a Language spoken: 2-day interven- NR tion on how to Maternal age: 30/31 prepare home- yrs made food for toddlers 305 continued
From page 306...
... (2017) timing and singleton birth; newly partu- 0.5–3.5 months/ Eligible: NR Baseline: duration of an establish- rient women control Enrolled: 97 NR eating a va- ment of lacta- were re- SES: 65%/47%/50% Completed: NR End: 17 riety of veg- tion with cruited from /71%/67% house- Exposure etables during the intention advertise- hold income 1.5–2.5 mo breastfeeding to exclusively ment in local >$50,000 Baseline: on the liking of breastfeed for newspapers, Education level: NR vegetables in >4 mo; and no websites, and 76%/67%/50%/71%/ End: 15 both members reported Philadelphia 67% college Exposure of the dyad allergies to Women, Race: Afri- 2.5–3.5 mo fruits or veg- Infants, and can American: Baseline: etables Children of- 18%/40%/29%/21%/ NR fices 27% End: 14 Exclusion: NR Caucasian: Exposure 59%/47%/43%/64%/ 0.5–3.5 mo 60% Baseline: Asian: NR 0%/7%/0%/0%/7% End: 14 More than one: 24%/7%/29%/14%/ 7% Ethnicity: NR Language spoken: NR Maternal age: 33/31/30/32/32 yrs
From page 307...
... 87%/ tion influenced to participate 90% child's intake Race: NR of homemade Ethnicity: NR foods, lipid Language spoken: concentration, NR and vitamin D Maternal age: 30/ status 31 yrs (mean) -- Hether- Explora- Test the effects Inclusion: NR Advertising SES: NR Approached: Baseline: 20 Baseline: 20 [United ington et tory trial of providing in the local Education level: 43% NR End: 17 End: 18 Kingdom]
From page 308...
... NR parent–infant ing with intervention Education level: pairs vegetables Exclusion: NR study; par- High 40%/48% Successfully continued ents complet- Race: NR completed: NR eating more ed informed Ethnicity: NR vegetables consent at Language: NR than the group baseline Maternal age: 31/32 that started yrs weaning with fruits.
From page 309...
... vention repeated expo- between 4 and of Wagenin- SES: NR Eligible: NR choke/apple/ study sure to either 7 mo old, who gen and Education level: Enrolled: 101 plum vegetables or were not being Almere in the High 58%/44%/ parent–infant fruits on an weaned yet Netherlands 38%/63% pairs Baseline: infant's veg- where both Race: NR Successfully 24/27/24 etable and fruit Exclusion: the research Ethnicity: NR completed: NR /24 acceptance Infants with locations Language: NR End: NR during the known food were via local Maternal age: Follow-up: first 18 days of allergies, swal- newspapers, 31/30/21/32 NR weaning lowing or diges- maternity or tion problems, infant wel or other medical fare centers, problems that postnatal care could influence groups, and the ability to eat a mailing to subscribers of babyinfo. nl (a Dutch advertise ment website that gives a box with free products for subscribers expecting a baby)
From page 310...
... with different begun to give centers, and SES: NR pairs partici- End: NR End: NR levels of veg- vegetables nurseries, Education level: NR pated in phases etable variety asking them Race: NR A and B (in early in wean- Exclusion: NR to contact Ethnicity: NR both locations) ; ing on new the team by Language: NR 143 in phase C food accep- telephone if Maternal age: 29/30 tance during 2 interested to yrs mo following participate the start of in a study of In Aalen: (average weaning infant feed- taken for BF group/ ing practices; FF group at baseline consent form SES: NR completed by Education level: NR mother Race: NR Ethnicity: NR Language: NR Maternal age: 30/30 yrs
From page 311...
... (2008) effects of re- with at least 2 4–9 mo were Race: 55% Black; Eligible: NR infants infants peated dietary wks of experi- recruited 30% White Enrolled: 74 End: NR End: NR experience ence eating from adver- Ethnicity: 3% His- infants total Study 2: Study 2: with either one cereal or fruit tisements in panic/Latino, 12% (Study 1: 39 Baseline: Baseline: BM fruit or a vari- from a spoon local news- other or mixed infants; Study green bean Variety 12 ety of fruits on and little expe- papers and Language spoken: 2: 35)
From page 312...
... and dietary cereal but had were recruit- with some college Enrolled: 45 Follow-up: Follow-up: experiences on little experience ed through education Successfully NR NR fruit and green with vegetables advertise- Race: 36% Black, completed: NR vegetable and fruits ments in local 46% White acceptance by newspapers, Ethnicity: 0% Asian, 4- to 8-mo-old Exclusion: NR breastfeed- 7% Hispanic/Latino, infants ing support 0% Indigenous, 11% groups, and mixed/other WIC in Phila- Language: NR delphia, PA Maternal age: 32 yrs for green beans (GB) group and 32 yrs for green beans plus peaches (GB+P)
From page 313...
... (2006) tive process innovative tionnaires Education level: NR Eligible: NR End: 45 evaluation communica- Exclusion: NR responders Race: NR Enrolled: 45 tion strategies post interven- Ethnicity: 100% Cree Completed: 45 promoting iron tion recruited Language spoken: nutrition for from tele- NR infants at risk phone list Maternal age: NR for iron defi- provided by ciency anemia health care in a northern offices.
From page 314...
... and Gray- sectional impact of a questionnaire SES: Employed 126 1: 2: Donald food-based Exclusion: NR responders 28%/27% Eligible: 96 Baseline: 32 Baseline: 22 (2005) approach post interven- Education level: Enrolled: 54 End: NR End: NR in promot- tion recruited 10/9 yrs Complete: NR ing iron-rich from tele- Race: NR complementary phone list Ethnicity: 100% Cree feeding for provided by Language spoken: mothers with health care NR infants at-risk offices.
From page 315...
... each participant's home to collect child anthropometric data, physi cal activity data, and collect ques tionnaires. Dietary recalls were conducted at unscheduled times following the home visit.
From page 316...
... . Each foods, infant hunger and satiety session was 30–45 signals, and infant feeding practic- minutes.
From page 317...
... tive theory; discourage sweetened beverages, Then 1 mo later re- information discourage TV)
From page 318...
... ; well-child visits sive feeding, age-appropriate other (sup healthy foods, portion sizes, etc.) , port group)
From page 319...
... Outcome data collected via ques tionnaire at 12 mo of age. PROBIT Morandi "Intervention pediatricians" were Health care Live; remote Communica- Trained or 2 yrs (5 routine NR [Italy]
From page 320...
... research assistants drates and saturated fats, while (via telephone call increasing intake of fiber and at 22, 24, and 32 promoting consumption of two wks gestation and a Dodd et servings of fruit, five servings of face-to-face visit at al.
From page 321...
... meetings and ac infant feeding practices (11 wks) , of ground cess to Facebook sleep (7 wks)
From page 322...
... (2013) establishing solid feeding includ ing variety and texture, neutral Daniels et repeated exposure to healthy al.
From page 323...
... (educational materials aimed to to-human; and verbal) -- nurse prac- then annually until [United promote exchange between patient remote tech in person and titioners, 5 yrs States]
From page 324...
... , nurses, and visits: delivered habits with a focus on seven differ- in Na- visuals (hand- medical as- at the 2-, 4-, 6-, 9-, ent elements in eating behaviors, tionwide Multifaceted: outs) sistants and 12-mo well including frequency of meals, Children's counseling child visits (dura family meals, milk consumption, Hospital (individual)
From page 325...
... , invitation to four group-parenting skills train ing workshops and comprehensive educational materials. Pediatricians were trained on focused negotiation skills based on concepts of motivational interven ing and epidemiology of health consequences of excess weight gain.
From page 326...
... -- Sanghavi Participants were first checked in Gallup In- Remote tech Other: com- Computer- Number of con- NR [United (2005) by a clerk, who registered the child dian Medi- noninterac- puterized ki- ized kiosk tacts/duration of States]
From page 327...
... both theoretical and practical vention: nutrition visits (minutes) : content on food groups, Medi- educational 4 workshops that terranean diet, physical activity (group work- lasted 90 minutes and food labels, and progressive shops)
From page 328...
... alternating with 6–8 ex- tasting op- menters phase: children posures to another with nothing portunities of received up to 200g added (repeated exposure group) RE vs FFL (2 separate pots of with a third purée group (control)
From page 329...
... , milk, fruits not reported the elabora and vegetables, increasing daily Multi- tion likeli physical activity and decreasing component: Duration of full hood model, daily consumption of sweets and educational intervention: 1 yr and the savory snacks and daily screen- (individual) ; precaution time behavior.
From page 330...
... TABLE E-2 Continued 330 Author Last Interven- Inter- Theoretical Trial Name Name, tion Loca- Intervention Intervention vention De- Intervention Dura- Framework [Country] Year Intervention Description tion Type Mode livered by tion/Intensity Cited -- Caton et Children were randomly assigned ECE Live Feeding expe- Nursery Duration of con- Associative [United al.
From page 331...
... children assigned to 1 of 3 conditions (RE, FFL, FNL) 2-4 days after baseline testing.
From page 332...
... site for infant feeding knowledge tive survey on visits (minutes) : theory and attitude and behavior changes website not reported for after viewing the infant feeding Single number of contacts website.
From page 333...
... . WIC SMS Inter- Macchi et The intervention SMS focused Phone/text Remote tech Communica- Researcher- 18 messages (1 per Trans theovention al.
From page 334...
... information pro vided on whether mothers watched it or how often) There was a 3- and 6-mo follow-up Home Visit Sleep Hernan- A responsive parenting interven- Home visit Live Communica- Trained Intervention con- NR SAAF dez et al.
From page 335...
... : exposure to green beans overview or cauliflower as target vegetable. RVE: tasting Five phone calls at child age 4‒6, opportuni- VIPP-FI/com 8, 13, and 16 mo.
From page 336...
... Multifaceted: handouts) ; 6 lessons focusing on optimal one-on-one activities infant feeding practices, responsive education; (interactive feeding, optimal complementary counseling; activities, goal feeding practices, whole family other (refer- setting)
From page 337...
... and focused on component: home visits by six obesity-associated behaviors education NFN home visitors (breastfeeding, juice/sugar sweetened beverages, solids, infant Duration of full sleep, TV/screen time, and sooth- intervention: Nov ability) with linkages to commu- 2013–Dec 2014 nity resources.
From page 338...
... home visit at 5.5 mo, 7 mo, and 9 counseling staff super- consultation (2018) mo providing individualized ad- vised by Taylor et vice on supporting introduction of a team of BLISS advice and al.
From page 339...
... intervention consisted (one-on-one food (4, 7, 13, and of 8 additional parent contacts and group)
From page 340...
... : 1 tive play, family physical activity Multicompo- home visit at 30 to and nutrition, and social support. nent: 36 wks gestation Appropriate resources were also educational and 5 home visits made available to mothers.
From page 341...
... The intervention consisted of offer- Home visits Live Communica- 27 trained On average five Social sup[United (2009) ing practical and nonjudgmental tion (verbal)
From page 342...
... (2021) group-based phone counseling ses- telephone remote tech munication, lactation group-based phone States]
From page 343...
... Mothers fed the control group (CG)
From page 344...
... Mobile-based maternal feeding Mobile- Remote tech Website Developed 38 wks gestation to Social cogni[South education program for overweight based noninterac- by research- 6 mo after child- tive theory Korea] prevention of infants.
From page 345...
... -- Tournier Infants were enrolled at 7.5 mo Research Live; remote- Communica- Researchers Two experimen- NR [France]
From page 346...
... (2019b) appropriate videos addressing link to noninterac- site video clips of 3–5 theory, social Health infant feeding topics, together educational tive min duration each cognitive Helle et [Norway]
From page 347...
... New Nordig Food Manifesto. teractive visuals, media, research (Reduced protein intake and sys- website, com- nurses, and tematic introduction of fruits and Multifaceted: munication a doctoral vegetables with repeated exposures tasting op- (written)
From page 348...
... Each book contained six pages presenting information as "farm to fork." Parents were asked to look at the book with their children for 5 minutes each day for 14 days. Parents then asked to offer their child a taste of both target foods every day.
From page 349...
... Øverby et Courses gave parents nutritional Univer- Live; remote Communica- Home Two course days NR al.
From page 350...
... Mothers were given a then an 11-day 35-day diary to record infant food exposure to only intake at home and other notes veggie purée; 5 immediately after feeding using a total lab days scale that measured infant's reac tion to feeding, similar feeding, Duration of full and rating of feeding occurred in intervention: 35 the lab with a video to capture days data and review for analyses.
From page 351...
... Half of the infants in each group were early introduction of foods and later introduction of foods based on when they were begin ning complementary feeding. continued 351
From page 352...
... After being fed 17, 18 and 19, the rice flour porridge for 5 days to vegetables or fruits get used to solid foods, two groups were given in one received exclusively vegetable of the two labo purées consisting of either green ratories. On days beans or artichoke on every other 3–16 the mothers day during 18 consecutive days.
From page 353...
... feeding at home, and then next 2 Delivered in 3 phases: days in the lab Phase A, days 1–12: veggie in troduction and test of a first new Duration of full veggie intervention: about B, days 13–23: repeated exposure 1 mo and test of second new veggie C, test of meat and fish consump tion continued 353
From page 354...
... : evaluated at the same time infants' acceptance of green beans of day as research on days 1 and 11 and alternating center exposure spoonful of carrots and spinach on sessions and the 8 days 2 and 12. The infants in the consecutive days of green bean group were fed only the home exposure the target vegetable, green beans, period.
From page 355...
... Mothers intervention: 12 went into the research lab 2 days days before and after an 8-day home exposure feeding period. Home exposure period: mothers fed jarred purée food contents of one jar of puréed green beans until the infant either refused the food on three consecutive occasions or finished the contents of the jar.
From page 356...
... and cereal as first rience explained proximately 5 mo States] complementary food at least 6 mo Single: procedure of age stopped at 7 of age.
From page 357...
... Key messages dialogues played 4 project: were used to promote awareness times a wk at vari- Knowledge around iron deficiency anemia ous times during is a mediat and promote iron-rich infant food the day ing factor and support breastfeeding. Inter- for behavior personal communication method and knowl conveyed information to target edge alone is audience about making homemade insufficient baby food.
From page 358...
... Yes anticipatory guidance, fruits, group had a lower of eating, (4) Yes parenting skills, and peer veg- "discretionary division of Lifestyle patterns: support frameworks.
From page 359...
... Yes intervention based on age, children (3) Yes anticipatory guidance, At the first follow- whose parent Sedentary activity: (4)
From page 360...
... Yes intervention based on Maternal dietary higher mater- ed questionnaire (3) Yes anticipatory guidance, intake was associ- Post-inter- nal feeding post-intervention (4)
From page 361...
... : FFQ validity or value added of previously validat- OPDI scores. ed among a sample of Australian women Child dietary index: three unscheduled telephone multipass method 24-hr recalls post-intervention where parents received a purposedesigned food measurement booklet to aid in food quantity estimation OPDI used for measuring child dietary targets continued 361
From page 362...
... intervention on Physical activity: Intervention assessed vegetable con- ActiGraph acceler- through a robust cluster sumption, sweet ometers randomized trial design. snacks, and water; Effect modification maternal age mod- analysis addressed equity erated the effect issues as they found dif of the intervention ferent results on impact of on vegetable con- intervention on unhealthy sumption and dietary behaviors as a water intake; a function of maternal edu significant inter- cation.
From page 363...
... Yes intervention based on Three dietary in the inter- computer-assisted, (3) Yes anticipatory guidance, patterns were vention standardized (4)
From page 364...
... Committee Comments Campbell et Child-focused NR No differ- Child diet: 3× 24- (1) Yes Robust multicomponent al.
From page 365...
... naire, there were six significant dif ferences between groups [the Med Diet group chil dren had parents reporting higher regular consump tion of fresh and cooked vegetables, fish, and nuts and reporting that they were less likely to eat fast food, baked goods, or pastries for break fast, sweets]
From page 366...
... Committee Comments GeliS Hoffmann Introduc- Caregiver-focused RF: Infant NR Infant weight Infant feeding (1) Yes Large sample size, well [Ger- et al.
From page 367...
... vention conducted in the context of Youth Health Care centers, a distinct feature of the health care ecosystem in the Netherlands. Low over all rates of obesity further reduce generalizability to the United States.
From page 368...
... Committee Comments Starting Messito et Healthy Caregiver-focused Recogniz- Caregiver- Increasing Feeding practices: (1) Yes Hispanic/Latino study Early al.
From page 369...
... -- Globus et Solid NR Infant Both caregiv- NR Mother–infant or (1) Yes Blinded videotaping to [Israel]
From page 370...
... Committee Comments PROBIT Morandi et Encour- Child-focused Encour- Caregiver- No signifi- Pediatrician com- (1) Uses existing clinical [Italy]
From page 371...
... refined mealtime; or adiposity a strict protocol carbo- food en- at 18 mo of No data on impact of hydrates, couraging age Child neurodevel- prenatal intervention on fiber, behaviors; opment: Ages and maternal dietary pat dairy bottle at No difference Stages Question- terns during pregnancy. bedtime in prevalence naire Hence not possible to of child BMI know why intervention z-scores Child dietary had no impact on child >85th percen- intake: question- hood obesity risk factors.
From page 372...
... Yes course approach to child born large for hood obesity prevention. gestational age in the No data on impact of lifestyle prenatal intervention on advice group maternal dietary pat compared terns during pregnancy.
From page 373...
... gain in the lifestyle advice group vs standard care group. For women, no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the proportion of women whose weight gain was below, within, or exceeded the IOM recomendations based on BMI in early pregnancy.
From page 374...
... infant cues, group had between 10 questions from bonding higher IFSQ groups. Infant Feeding Sample size was small; so with baby feeding be- Style Question- cial media platform used and under- havior scores naire (IFSQ)
From page 375...
... There of specified fruits, tions of the was a time Maternal feeding but preferences growth. effect for style and practices: for vegetables Positive child eating Infant Feeding and discretionary feeding en- behavior.
From page 376...
... Committee Comments Daniels et NR Caregiver- Time was (1)
From page 377...
... fewer nonresponsive strategies (three of six items) and more responsive strategies (two of two items)
From page 378...
... Committee Comments Daniels et Caregiver-focused: Child-focused NR (1)
From page 379...
... Daniels et NR Caregiver- Fewer (but (1)
From page 380...
... Committee Comments Daniels et NR Caregiver- Rapid weight (1)
From page 381...
... ipants be achieved in a pediatric punch, cow's milk more active office, included written than control. in monitoring materials that could be child feeding scalable.
From page 382...
... Committee Comments -- Fildes et al. Veg- Child-focused Introduc- NR Infant food Feeding method: (1)
From page 383...
... Providing mothers with information aimed at changing their own eating patterns showed posi tive differ ences in reported infant feeding behaviors. continued 383
From page 384...
... . with CG in- Infant feeding fants but not behaviors and tim statistically ing of solid foods: significant.
From page 385...
... TARGet Maguire et Juice, Child-focused Age at Child-focused No differ- Iron depletion: (1) Yes 86‒89% college educated Kids!
From page 386...
... Committee Comments continued bottle use because the child "likes the bottle better than the cup" and 25% responded that the child "does not drink enough using a cup." -- Sanghavi Formula, NR Knowledge NR Parents in the Knowledge assess- () No Child well clinic wait[United (2005)
From page 387...
... tive factor fish, olive FFQ adapted from Study participants have No significant between the oil, and adult FFQ BMI- high education level differences were IG and CG. vitamins C weight/height observed between and D for the two groups the interven of children for tion group food and nutrient compared to intakes.
From page 388...
... Committee Comments -- Ahern et al. Vegetable Child-focused Repeated Child-focused Significant Leicester SMSSE (1)
From page 389...
... . -- Verbestel et Water, Child-focused Meal/ NR There was a Child dietary in- (1)
From page 390...
... Committee Comments -- Caton et al. Vegetable Child-focused Repeated Child-focused A significant Child height: (1)
From page 391...
... . food to the infants did not through the feed infants At follow-up, INFAnet Nutrition every 2 hrs no significant for Child Care compared differences in Providers.
From page 392...
... Committee Comments Cooperative Extension NEAT Horodynski Introduc- NR Adult Child-fo- NR Toddlers feeding (1) No Focus on low-income [United and Stom- ing new modeling cused: self-regulation: (2)
From page 393...
... WIC SMS Inter- Macchi et Breast- Child-focused Prevention NR NR Infant feeding (1) Yes WIC-based texting camvention al.
From page 394...
... Committee Comments Gibby et al. NR Caregiver- Focus was (1)
From page 395...
... Palacios et Caregiver-focused Caregiver- Child-focused (1)
From page 396...
... derived feeding practices. derived from behavior from an- Of the nine ques- anticipatory questions Unclear how caregivers ticipatory tions, one [size of guidance asked, only used the DVD interven guidance baby's stomach]
From page 397...
... sive parenting ed the group Pressure based infants' bottles. No group used effect on use feeding practices: Assessed a very high difference between significantly of pressure to IFSQ number of outcomes groups on intro- less pressure finish/soothe.
From page 398...
... : ment to emotional Children's eating soothe a overeating at behavior question distressed 30 mo. naire but not hungry Feeding mode: child, and Infant Feeding to use Practice Study 2 repeated FFQ from the CDC exposure to promote Anthropometry: acceptance Maternal pre of foods, pregnancy weight the impor- collected from
From page 399...
... tance of medical records; modeling maternal height healthy collected from eating medical records behaviors, or Shorr porshared table stadiometer feeding whereby BMI was responsi- calculated from the bility, and height and weight establish- measures; infant ment of recumbent length routines and weight meaand limits. sured with Shorr stadiometers and Seca digital scales; conditional weight gain measured by calculating scores from standardized residuals from the linear regression of weight for age at 28 wks on weight for age at birth.
From page 400...
... Committee Comments Hohman et Child-focused NR Mothers (1) Yes Adjusted for multiple al.
From page 401...
... control group; there was no difference on restriction or responsive satiety. At 52 wks, moth ers in the RP group report ed lower use of pressure to eat and greater use of the two structure based feeding scales, limit ing exposure to unhealthy foods, and 401 consistent feeding rou tines.
From page 402...
... Committee Comments Hohman et Child-focused NR Child-focused (1) Yes Adjusted for multiple al.
From page 403...
... Yes equate study size, limited States] weight more (3)
From page 404...
... Committee Comments - OVERALL: U.S.-based; focus on responsive feeding with some parts of curriculum similar to one already used by some state WIC agencies (Baby Behavior) ; fairly low dropout (14%)
From page 405...
... probably very reasonable for most home visiting programs to deliver. Baby's Van Vliet et Study Child-focused RVE: Child- Child-fo- Purée intake: (1)
From page 406...
... Committee Comments 18 mo (not Mother report of 24)
From page 407...
... ; corrected Study for multiple comparisons; effects demonstrated for Infant feeding population with many history: Adapted economic and environBEVQ-PS mental challenges with accessing healthy foods Infant height/ (almost the whole Navajo weight: extracted Nation is a food desert) from medical and high health risk (high charts prevalence of maternal obesity and diabetes)
From page 408...
... Committee Comments Delta Tussing- Toddler- Child-focused: Infant NR NR Infant dietary in- (1) Yes African-American target Healthy Humphreys friendly Nutrient intake feeding take: 24-hr dietary (2)
From page 409...
... cook introduc- tion group fresh ing new had signifi- Whether all subjects had food at foods cantly higher all home visits and com home, knowledge pleted all modules not maximize than control mentioned, sample pri healthy post-inter- marily African American, nutrients, vention. limiting generalizability, select no long-term follow-up healthy and no behavior change restau- measures after interven rant tion completed, but this options, is planned as is a 5-year food study.
From page 410...
... Yes denced-based home visitStates] ids, fruit, Those who com- breastfeed- had a higher (3)
From page 411...
... No Health re- Questionnaire by fruit or significant differ- lated: NR Wardle vegeta- ence was seen for ble; offer fruit and vegetable Infant feeding easy consumption. questionnaire: foods Differences in food Toddler-Parent during preferences be- Mealtime Behavior illness tween groups was Questionnaire and not significant.
From page 412...
... Committee Comments Williams Child-focused NR NR (1) Yes More CF variety in Rx Erickson et (2)
From page 413...
... No considered both reported intake at 12 or likely to feed or 24 mo. infant eating behaviors 24 mo themselves and BMI most or all of their food 20% attrition at 24-mo than control follow-up, limited study infants at size for some outcomes, every age.
From page 414...
... Committee Comments POI Fangupo et Food- Child-focused Appropri- Child-fo- NR Baseline question- (1) No Well-designed interven[New al.
From page 415...
... ; study post artichoke ac- findings are well known/ ceptance, the great- well accepted at this est increase was point (repeated exposures seen in RE (liking are helpful strategy for and intake) , intake increasing child vegetable increased for FFL acceptance/intake)
From page 416...
... Yes infant feeding practices. milk ing and The inter- the age at solid foods: Short (4)
From page 417...
... than other inter ventions, which may not be as reasonable given all other topics home visit ing programs must cover; strengths: many HV programs now use trained 417 paraprofessionals. continued
From page 418...
... Committee Comments Other -- Harris et al. SSB Caregiver-focused NR NR NR Video Experiment (1)
From page 419...
... Yes foods increased nitifantly as- ed food diary Short-term outcomes only. vegetable intake sociated with at 9 mo of age.
From page 420...
... Committee Comments -- Cauble et Types NR How much NR No signifi- Use of solid foods: (1) No Included positive pro[United al.
From page 421...
... was more likely to Children who Feeding Infants: be rejected. were reported Behavior and to have been Facial Expression breastfed Coding System more in the (FIBFECS)
From page 422...
... Yes Small study, substantial cialized meals for 3 mo intervention to assess baby face attrition, subjective out foods accepted a new and the better responses. comes vegetable better acceptance 3 than infants fed mo later may Infant food intake: Blinding information: Nei commercial meals be due solely weighed before ther participants nor data in jars.
From page 423...
... difference in statis knowledge tical Convenience sample, all of providing power primiparas so limited solid food for was generalizability, unclear overweight insuf- which solid foods were prevention. ficient encouraged/discouraged in dis- for overweight prevention, cus- modest sample size, no pi sion)
From page 424...
... Committee Comments Food4tod- Roed et al. Impor- Child-focused Repeated NR NR Infant food intake: (1)
From page 425...
... Yes ture, long-term follow-up (smooth The more children food group intro- with correspond- (3) Yes vs were exposed to textures, Providing duced more ing food texture (4)
From page 426...
... Committee Comments -- Wen et al. Timing NR Cup feed- Caregiver- NR Outcomes: as- (1)
From page 427...
... correction)
From page 428...
... Committee Comments Early Helle et al. Appro- Child-focused Responsive Child- No group Child feeding be- (1)
From page 429...
... . course approach with ongoing interventions Caregiver- across various stages of focused: childhood.
From page 430...
... Committee Comments Helle et al. Child-focused Child-fo- At 24 mo, (1)
From page 431...
... In any vegetable intake case, they provided the were greater in foods to both groups. All the intervention families had means, they group.
From page 432...
... Committee Comments -- Owen et al. Veg- Child-focused Repeated Child-focused Child-focused Questionnaires: (1)
From page 433...
... No their thinking was general water outcomes as- as possible differences one question "to and they did not give as thirst sessed, two were in reports of which degree do specific behavioral advice quencher, significantly children be- you feel your child like repeated exposure. iron rich different between ing skeptical is skeptical when They also recognize that food, nu- groups at 15 mo of of new foods new food is intro- perhaps they overem tritious age (consumption between duced" 1-6.
From page 434...
... Committee Comments Øverby et Iron, vi- Child-focused Regular NR Child-focused Food consumption: (1) No This study suggests that al.
From page 435...
... Yes No comments listed [United al.
From page 436...
... . greater amounts than green beans.
From page 437...
... At 6 mo, vegetable intake was significantly different as expected, since number and portion size of vegetables eaten increased, but no main effect on group. By day 35, no differences in intake were found between the two groups.
From page 438...
... teraction between age of introduction Limited information for and exposure on our purposes as focus was pea consump- on identifying how best to tion: among late feed infants, not how best exposure infants, to impact recommended the variety group feeding practices. ate more pea at follow-up than the single taste group suggesting vari ety of vegetables introduced
From page 439...
... 23 mo, the green beans intake for both groups had dropped signifi cantly while apple intake was stable. 439 continued
From page 440...
... After the after the feed days 17 and 18. The mean feeding, the ing, including the Fruit intake in intake of mothers rated vegetable purée the fruit group green beans on a 9-point that was spilled on increased signifi- and plums scale how the table, floor, bib, cantly.
From page 441...
... Offering weaning in- greatest new In lab infant food outcomes three vegetables creased new food intake. intake: Weighed jar for 3 consecutive food accep- and bib before and Blinding information: days each did tance but was Health re- after feeding.
From page 442...
... immediately before and after each feed Second study: 8 on a Mettler PM 15 days of vegetable top-loading bal variety both be- ance. The differ tween and within ence in the weight meals led to in- of the bib before creased acceptance and after the feed of green beans, was subtracted carrots and spin- from the weight of ach and the food to account for any food that was spilled.
From page 443...
... questionnaires on their tion, and facial own eating habits and expressions. their infant feeding Repeated op- habits; researchers strati portunities to fied some analyses based taste green beans on breast-fed vs formula enhanced fed infants; 12/45 moth similar acceptance ers had college education in both breastfed and 10/45 breastfed their and formula-fed infant.
From page 444...
... Committee Comments -- Koehler et Food- Child-focused NR NR NR Compliance with (1) No Transition to family foods [Ger- al.
From page 445...
... Short-term feeding trial, only breastfed infants limiting generalizability Limited information for our purposes as focus was on identifying how best to feed infants, not how best 445 to impact recommended feeding practices. continued
From page 446...
... Committee Comments -- Verrall et Iron rich Caregiver-focused NR NR NR Evaluations/ (1) No No comments listed [Canada]
From page 447...
... 2012. Evaluation of an intervention to promote protective infant feeding practices to prevent childhood obesity: Outcomes of the NOURISH RCT at 14 months of age and 6 months post the first of two intervention modules.
From page 448...
... 2012. An evaluation of mother-cen tered anticipatory guidance to reduce obesogenic infant feeding behaviors.
From page 449...
... 2019b. Examining the effects of an eHealth intervention from infant age 6 to 12 months on child eating behaviors and ma ternal feeding practices one year after cessation: The Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health.
From page 450...
... on infant feeding practices and weight gain in low-income minorities. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 37(7)
From page 451...
... 2018. IN SIGHT responsive parenting intervention and infant feeding practices: Randomized clinical trial.
From page 452...
... 2020. Effects of telephone and short message service support on infant feeding practices, "tummy time," and screen time at 6 and 12 months of child age: A 3-group randomized clinical trial.


This material may be derived from roughly machine-read images, and so is provided only to facilitate research.
More information on Chapter Skim is available.