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From page 41...
... 41 C H A P T E R 3 A Framework for Incorporating Maintenance Costs into a TAMP Every agency participating in the peer exchange, described in Chapter 2, noted significant challenges that kept them from incorporating maintenance into their TAMP to the degree desired. This framework has been developed to help agencies identify and develop strategies for overcoming the specific barriers that prevent them from quantifying and incorporating maintenance costs into their TAMPs.
From page 42...
... 42 the practices identified through those steps. The following sections of this chapter elaborate on each step and describe how each is addressed in the Guide.
From page 43...
... 43 Table 1. Maintenance Strategies Maintenance Strategy Description Condition-Based Management Requires collection of reliable inventory and condition data over the asset's service life, used to develop models to estimate asset deterioration and predict future asset conditions to evaluate the type and timing of maintenance actions.
From page 44...
... 44 Table 2. Maintenance activity categories.
From page 45...
... 45 MDOT SHA enters labor, equipment, and materials costs for state-forces work into the electronic team activity cards (eTAC) system.
From page 46...
... 46 Connecting Maintenance Costs to Performance Using costs in TAMP analyses such as LCP, performance gap analysis, and risk management, requires agencies to develop a relationship between investments and future performance. For maintenance activities, the relationship is often established through MQA programs.
From page 47...
... 47 Historic work order data provide inputs for estimating the LOE, as well as required resources and funding, to achieve performance targets. Statewide LOS targets can be developed from agency priorities and goals or customer surveys.
From page 48...
... 48 Connecting Maintenance Costs to Performance without an MQA Program MQA programs provide a structure for tracking conditions and performance in relation to a wide range of maintenance activities. However, even without an MQA program, states have developed means for associating asset performance with maintenance needs.
From page 49...
... 49 maintenance costs to optimize its LCP analysis results. As defined in Table , different categories of maintenance activities will have different types of impacts on asset conditions and will, therefore, be incorporated differently into LCP analyses.
From page 50...
... 50 distinctively different performance depending on the asset condition immediately prior to repair. These factors influence the types of data required to adequately consider preventive maintenance in LCP.
From page 51...
... 51 In the case of unit or component replacement, the LCP analysis should be handled in the same way as reconstruction activities. It is essential that the models and management systems used to perform LCP analysis are integrated with data regarding the cost of replacement by any delivery mechanism.
From page 52...
... 52 plays a key role in asset resilience before, during, and after extreme weather events. Maintenance activities performed before events ensure assets are functioning as designed.
From page 53...
... 53 MDOT SHA has yet to have enterprise-wide quantified risk management processes. These are currently underway for each asset class at both the network- and project-levels.
From page 54...
... 54 Forecasting Maintenance Costs The research team identified that forecasting maintenance costs would include forecasting fixed costs that tend to support RM, emergency response, and organizational strengthening activities that are not easily tied to asset management performance measures. It would also include forecasting performance-driven variable costs that are typically related to asset performance and are programmed based on distributing funds to achieve specific performance goals.
From page 55...
... 55 Implementation, Monitoring, and Continual Improvement As agencies implement process improvements to their maintenance management and TAMP development practices, they will develop further insights into asset performance, needs, risks, and delivery options that should lead to continual improvement. The Guide for Incorporating Maintenance Costs in a TAMP includes information to help states repeat the steps to continually increase their TAM maturity.
From page 56...
... 56 of maintenance activities on pavement, bridge, and other asset performance is also critical. Additionally, coordination of projects and efforts across these areas will help ensure routine pavement maintenance projects are not completed shortly before a major rehabilitation project.
From page 57...
... 57 Since unit costs will vary between delivery mechanism (i.e., in-house crews versus contract) , the delivery mechanism must be selected before the costs can be estimated and incorporated into TAMP processes.

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