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Pages 7-40

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From page 7...
... 7 C H A P T E R 2 Summary of Current Knowledge The Guide's development included several efforts to gather information and document current practices related to incorporating maintenance costs into a TAMP. A literature search was conducted to review relevant publications.
From page 8...
... 8 • Defining TAM. • Elements of a TAM.
From page 9...
... 9 Using an LCP Process to Support Transportation Asset Management: A Handbook on Putting the Federal Guidance into Practice (Zimmerman, et.
From page 10...
... 10 NCHRP Report 814: Assessing Data Readiness (SPP et.
From page 11...
... 11 stakeholders (Markow 2012)
From page 12...
... 12 Transportation Asset Management: A Focus on Implementation, which was replaced by the current one, this synthesis study was found to have little relevance to the NCHRP 23-08 project. NCHRP Report 08-36, Task 114: Transportation Asset Management for Ancillary Structures (Rose et al., 2014)
From page 13...
... 13 support the development of the NCHRP 23-08 framework for incorporating maintenance costs into a TAMP. NCHRP Report 736: Resource Allocation Logic Framework to Meet Highway Asset Preservation (Wiegmann et al., 2012)
From page 14...
... 14 Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Framework, 3rd Edition.
From page 15...
... 15 What Is Routine Maintenance? Routine maintenance (RM)
From page 16...
... 16 Preventive Maintenance PM is a cost-effective means of extending the service life of highway bridges. PM for highway bridges is a strategy for extending service life by applying cost-effective treatments to bridge elements.
From page 17...
... 17 Preventive Maintenance Also called "routine" maintenance, it is the activity performed at regularly scheduled intervals for the upkeep of equipment. Includes checking, testing and inspecting, recordkeeping, cleaning, and periodic replacement when called for in the PM schedule.
From page 18...
... 18 Roadsides Physical Maintenance Restoration of erosion controls. Removing slides, reshaping drainage channels and side slopes, mowing, and tree trimming.
From page 19...
... 19 Preventive Maintenance These are planned asset management strategies that add system service life by retarding future deterioration and are delivered as programmed or scheduled projects. Because the work is scheduled and eligible for federal funding, it is primarily let to private contractors.
From page 20...
... 20 Peer Exchange Findings The four peer exchange sessions held virtually between the dates of November 12 and December 8, 2020, generated useful conversations and raised questions that the research team addressed in the framework and final guidance. This was a useful exercise that helped shape the work in the next phase of the project, beginning with the case studies.
From page 21...
... 21 • Participants noted several pavement and bridge-related maintenance activities considered in their TAMPs, but there was considerable misalignment between agencies. For instance: • Pavement maintenance examples included: pavement overlays, chip seals, fog sealing, mill and fill, pothole patching, and thin patching for asphalt and concrete.
From page 22...
... 22 1. General Data Collection Issues.
From page 23...
... 23 Session 2 - Breakout Group 2 Discussion on Collecting Maintenance Contract Data Participants in this group discussed how their agencies identify maintenance work done by contract in the financial management or capital program management system. One agency described codes in the financial system that differentiate between contract and in-house work.
From page 24...
... 24 Session 2 - Large Group Discussion Following the breakouts, attendees participated in a large group discussion in which the groups reported highlights, and people could pose additional questions or issues. The following points were raised: • Maintenance covers a broad array of work types, some of which impact an asset's service life and some of which do not.
From page 25...
... 25 Session 3 Summary Overview The third peer exchange session was held virtually on December 1, 2020, focusing on incorporating maintenance data into life-cycle planning, investment/financial planning, and investment strategy development. The session objectives included a review of practices for incorporating maintenance costs in TAMP analyses and identifying challenges to adopting these practices.
From page 26...
... 26 The participants discussed how their agencies' maintenance priorities have changed based on a change in asset conditions. One agency discussed challenges with incorporating maintenance costs for bridges in a TAMP.
From page 27...
... 27 comparison shows that the cost savings from a PM approach is significant and shows the importance of being proactive rather than reactive. Another agency looks at all the treatments that need to be done and the available funding.
From page 28...
... 28 Session 4 - Breakout Group 1 Discussion on Risk and Resiliency This breakout group focused on three questions related to risk and resiliency. Does your TAMP describe how maintenance is involved in mitigating risks in the risk register?
From page 29...
... 29 • Several agencies mentioned they are having trouble retaining experienced, qualified technical maintenance staff due to salary. As a result of this, they are funding a lot of work through capital contracts being managed by maintenance personnel.
From page 30...
... 30 funding needed to bring the inventory up to the target. The work plan covers all maintenance activities with unit costs for each to develop the budget.
From page 31...
... 31 What is needed to guide decisions on the maintenance side? Participants mentioned that the information needed to guide maintenance decisions depends on the particular asset.
From page 32...
... 32 • Several participants suggested the guidance should help show states how to deliver good TAM even if that means not achieving targets (e.g., percent poor) that drive worst-first thinking.
From page 33...
... 33 guidance was designed to address both the strategic and tactical issues related to maintenance cost considerations. • New Ways of Thinking: During the development of the guidance, the project team looked for opportunities to help states adopt enhanced TAM practices.
From page 34...
... 34 Alabama Alabama DOT (ALDOT) was selected to participate in this effort due to its robust asset inventory and asset condition data collection processes.
From page 35...
... 35 • FDOT's Maintenance Division is responsible for delivering or managing mitigation strategies for risks in the TAMP risk register, including strategies to address facilities damaged by multiple emergency events. Impact on the Framework The project team identified three aspects of FDOT's practices that could be incorporated into the guidance framework.
From page 36...
... 36 creates a consistent approach and builds confidence in the process and results. Their approach may be useful for other agencies interested in a sampling approach.
From page 37...
... 37 and the GIS-based EAMS illustrate effective management systems and how agencies can effectively and systematically collect data on, manage, and analyze ancillary assets. MDOT SHA's PMS is based on RSL principles, which means the PMS associates RSL improvements with different treatment options and maximizes the use of these treatments based on the desired objective function.
From page 38...
... 38 in a TAMP. Their maintenance cost models also demonstrated an approach for capturing maintenance funding needs to plan future investments.
From page 39...
... 39 New York NYSDOT was selected to participate in this effort because it revised its bridge maintenance practices to address current and future needs and the motivations for these changes were thought to be important. Also, NYSDOT maximizes its state-force activities in maintenance work so the agency had strong practices to showcase in this area.
From page 40...
... 40 MQA practices and data and has enhanced its rockslide risk programs to better mitigate risks. These additional efforts provided lessons learned that were incorporated into the framework.

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