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1 Introduction
Pages 11-17

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From page 11...
... Fine PM in the range of 0.1 to 2.5 μm generally exists due to coagulation of UFP, condensation of vapors onto existing particles, emissions from indoor sources, for example, soot from combustion processes, and penetration of particles of this size range from outdoors to indoors. Particles with diameters of greater than 2.5 μm are generally referred to as coarse particulate matter.
From page 12...
... THE STUDY'S STATEMENT OF TASK Against this backdrop, the EPA approached the National Academies with a request to consider the state of the science on the health risks of exposure to fine particulate matter indoors as well as engineering solutions and interventions to reduce risks of exposure to it indoors, including practical mitigation solutions to reduce exposure in residential settings. An expert committee was formed to respond to that request.
From page 13...
... The committee undertook a wide-ranging evaluation of relevant research on particulate matter, sources of fine PM, building characteristics, exposure assessment, human health effects associated with indoor environments, and the effectiveness of exposure mitigation methods. EPA requested that the committee focus on residential settings but also consider schools and other non-industrial indoor environments where appropriate.
From page 14...
... Three classes of factors govern conditions in occupied indoor environments. The first pertains to the adverse exposures themselves and includes such factors as the outdoor concentration, indoor sources and emission rates, and the physical properties of the agent.
From page 15...
... Conversely, as ventilation rates are reduced, the indoor environment is progressively less influenced by pollutants of outdoor origin and outdoor environmental conditions and more strongly influenced by indoor sources and conditions. The consequences of fine PM exposure depend in part on how long people spend in different types of indoor environments and on differences in the populations that occupy various building types.
From page 16...
... Other removal processes can be important, such as the deposition of particles onto indoor surfaces or active filtration. Again, generally speaking, the primary elements that can be used to ensure good indoor air quality are source control, ventilation, the proper management of indoor environmental conditions, and the appropriate use of filtration.
From page 17...
... Practical mitigation approaches for reducing exposure to, and health effects of, indoor fine particulate matter are described in Chapter 7. The mitigation measures that are considered include source control, ventilation, central filtration and standalone air cleaning, and personal protective equipment.


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