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8 Key Findings, Conclusions, and Recommendations
Pages 216-226

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From page 216...
... Key conclusions and overarching recommendations resulting from this effort and the findings that underlie them are summarized below. Box 8-1 contains a synopsis of what is and isn't known about the health risks of indoor exposure to fine particulate matter and practical mitigation solutions.
From page 217...
... Increased ventilation can also be effective at reducing exposure to fine particulate matter originating from indoor sources, but without proper filtration, inlet air can significantly increase exposure to fine particulate matter of outdoor origin. Importantly, while it is reasonable to infer health benefits from the lowering of exposure to indoor fine PM, the literature related to such health benefits remains sparse.
From page 218...
... Because outdoor PM2.5 infiltrates and persists indoors, the bulk of human exposure to PM of outdoor origin is likely to take place indoors. Disparities exist in population exposure to indoor fine particulate matter of both outdoor and indoor origin.
From page 219...
... Consequently, the opportunities to implement mitigation strategies where most needed and to support related research are fragmented. There has thus been limited progress to reduce exposure to indoor fine PM, even though effective and practical mitigation approaches exist.
From page 220...
... Disparities exist in population exposure to indoor fine particulate matter of both outdoor and indoor origin. These occur not only because of higher indoor exposure concentrations due to more activities happening in smaller, densely occupied, and interconnected (multi-family)
From page 221...
... Toward this end, the committee recommends that EPA, in collaboration with other governmental entities, private funders, and standards and professional organizations, foster additional research on methods for measuring PM in the indoor environment. Studies of indoor sources of PM may take place in controlled laboratory chambers or actual indoor spaces.
From page 222...
... Research is needed to quantify the efficacy of mitigation efforts to reduce exposure and the health benefits of practical mitigation strategies. Large-scale intervention studies are needed to establish an evidence base for the health impacts of indoor fine particulate matter exposure and of mitigation measures, including different exposure scenarios, a range of interventions, and multiple health endpoints.
From page 223...
... There is an opportunity to educate the general public about the indoor sources of fine particulate matter to assist decision making when choosing indoor products and activities to minimize exposure. Furthermore, EPA, in collaboration with other governmental entities, private funders, and standards and professional organizations, should foster additional research on spatiotemporal PM2.5 variability indoors.
From page 224...
... EPA, in collaboration with other governmental entities, private funders, and standards and professional organizations, should thus foster additional research on ambient air pollution as a source of indoor particles. Although the penetration of outdoor air pollutants into the indoor environments is relatively well understood, knowledge gaps remain in terms of the health effects of ambient particles that infiltrate and persist indoors.
From page 225...
... The indoor air research community should explicitly incorporate social science and behavioral health science perspectives and expertise into studies of the health impacts of indoor PM2.5 to better understand how social, cultural, and behavioral factors may influence PM2.5 exposure and health effects and the implementation of practical mitigation strategies. As this report makes clear, there are systematic differences in exposure to indoor PM and in susceptibility to adverse effects of that exposure that result in disparate health outcome risks for different populations.
From page 226...
... More targeted data on such exposures are necessary to improve our understanding of them and, ultimately, to protect susceptible populations. Indoor environment researchers need to collaborate with community- based organizations and community members if they are to conduct the kinds of culturally sensitive studies that will produce information relevant to these populations and develop effective messaging on PM exposure issues to help motivate practical mitigation.


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