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Pages 1-10

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From page 1...
... asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene a committee of scientific experts to consider the state-of the-science on the health risks of exposure to fine particulate matter indoors along with engineering solutions and interventions to reduce risks of exposure to it, including practical mitigation strategies. EPA requested that the committee focus on residential settings but also consider schools and other non-industrial indoor environments where appropriate.
From page 2...
... These factors, along with the frequency and duration of exposure, influence the health effects caused by the inhalation of indoor fine PM, including ultrafine particles. Sources of Indoor Fine Particulate Matter Fine PM sources are the drivers for exposure, health effects, and the need for mitigation.
From page 3...
... A challenge in understanding individual sources, sinks, and transformations is that measurements of indoor fine particulate matter concentrations, size distributions, or composition alone generally do not yield insights into the presence or magnitude of specific mechanisms. Rather, indoor concentration measurements produce a measure of the net result of any number of competing or interacting processes.
From page 4...
... Due to improvements in outdoor air quality and advances in building design and construction, indoor exposure to PM2.5 of outdoor origin has generally been decreasing in the United States over the past decades. However, this reduction is not occurring uniformly, and communities affected by wildfire smoke and those near localized outdoor sources such as congested roadways or industrial facilities can still be significantly burdened.
From page 5...
... Health Impacts of Exposure to Fine PM in Buildings Knowledge of the health effects of PM2.5 is dominated by studies of exposure to PM of outdoor origin. Such studies are useful in understanding health effects from indoor exposures because of the encroachment that outdoor pollution makes into indoor spaces.
From page 6...
... Practical Mitigation Given the importance of PM2.5 to human health and the exposures that occur indoors, there is a compelling need to address mitigation approaches to reduce exposure. Research indicates that several practical measures can be taken to effectively reduce indoor PM2.5 concentrations.
From page 7...
... 2. Disparities exist in population exposure to indoor fine particulate matter of both outdoor and indoor origin.
From page 8...
... Consequently, opportunities to implement mitigation strategies where most needed and to support related research are fragmented. There has thus been limited progress to reduce exposure to indoor fine PM, even though effective and practical mitigation approaches exist.
From page 9...
... Research is needed to quantify the efficacy of mitigation efforts to reduce exposure and the health benefits of practical mitigation strategies. Large-scale intervention studies should be conducted to establish an evidence base for the health impacts of indoor fine particulate matter exposure and mitigation measures, including different exposure scenarios, a range of interventions, and multiple health endpoints.
From page 10...
... While there are standalone air cleaners based on media filtration that lower indoor fine PM concentrations, research is still needed to develop cleaners that are priced in a range that allows for their widespread use; that are effective at lowering exposure to, and the health effects of, indoor aerosols; and that have features such as quiet operation that make them more likely to be used.


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